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Full text of "Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog"

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idergraduate and Graduate Catalog Misericordia University 






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Table of Contents 

Academic Calendar 2008-2009 5 

About Misericordia University 6 

Policy Statements 6 

Mission Statement 6 

Diversity Statement 7 

Accreditations 7 

Contacts for More Information 8 

Student Support Services 9 

Bookstore 9 

Computer Facilities 9 

Counseling Center 9 

Learning Resource Center 10 

Library 10 

Campus Life 11 

Athletics 11 

Campus Ministry 12 

Campus Safety 12 

Clubs and Organizations 12 

Governing Boards 12 

Residential Facilities 13 

Student Communications 13 

Student Health Center 13 

Career and Placement Services 15 

Insalaco Center for Career Development 15 

Special Institutes 15 

The Diversity Institute 15 

The Ethics Institute 15 

Institute of Law and Religious Life 16 

Institute on Sacred Scripture 16 

Undergraduate Programs 16 

Admission Requirements 16 

Transfer Program 17 

Other Undergraduate Admission Information 19 

Financial Information 21 

Tuition and Fees 21 

Expenses per Semester 2008-2009 21 

Special Fees, Deposits, and Expenses 2008-2009 22 

Release of Transcripts or Diplomas 25 

Undergraduate Auditing 25 

Financial Assistance Program 25 

Application Procedures 26 

Tuition Payment Options 31 

Refund Policies 33 

Endowed Scholarships 36 

Annual Scholarships 39 

Academics 39 

A Misericordia University Education 39 

Academic Policies and Procedures 40 

Special Programs 51 



Alternative Learners Project 51 

Military Science Course Descriptions (MIL) 55 

Center for Adult and Continuing Education 56 

Flexible Schedules for Adults 56 

Academic Program Definitions 58 

Academic Program Listings 59 

Undergraduate and Graduate Curricula Academic Colleges 60 

College of Arts and Sciences 60 

College of Health Sciences 61 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 61 

Core Curriculum Requirements 63 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 67 

Accounting Major 67 

Biochemistry Major 70 

Biology Major 72 

Business Administration Major 79 

Chemistry Major 86 

Clinical Laboratory Science Major 91 

Communications Major 94 

Computer Science Major 99 

English Major 103 

Health Care Management Major 112 

History Major 119 

History Major Pre-law Specialization 121 

Information Technology Major Management Information Systems (MIS) 

Specialization 125 

Information Technology Major Information Technology Security Specialization ..128 

Management Major 131 

Marketing Major 132 

Mathematics Major 133 

Medical Imaging Programs 137 

Nursing Major 158 

Occupational Therapy Major 174 

Philosophy Major 192 

Philosophy, Pre-law 194 

Pre-Doctor of Physical Therapy Program 198 

Psychology Major 199 

Social Work Major 208 

Speech-language Pathology Major 216 

Sport Management Major 232 

Teacher Education Programs 234 

Early Childhood and Elementary Education 243 

Elementary Education 245 

Biology Major, Secondary Education 248 

Chemistry Major, Secondary Education 252 

English Major, Secondary Education 250 

History Major, Secondary Education 254 

Mathematics Major, Secondary Education 256 

Special Education and Elementary Education 247 

Special Education 258 



Other Academic Majors 268 

Health Science Major 268 

Interdisciplinary Studies Major 268 

Professional Studies Major 269 

Minors 270 

Accounting Minor 270 

Addictions Counseling Minor 270 

Biology Minor 272 

Chemistry Minor 273 

Child Welfare Services Minor 273 

Communications Minor 274 

Computer Science Minor 275 

English Minor 275 

Ethics Minor 276 

Gerontology Minor 276 

Health Care Informatics Minor 279 

History Minor 280 

Management Minor 280 

Management Information Systems Minor 280 

Mathematics Minor 281 

Philosophy Minor 282 

Political Science Minor 282 

Psychology Minor 284 

Religious Studies Minor 284 

Theater Minor 287 

Writing Minor 287 

Other Academic Course Disciplines 289 

Fine Arts 289 

Geography 291 

Health Professions 292 

Honors 294 

Physics 295 

Sociology 296 

Certificates Programs/Certifications 297 

Addictions Counseling Certificate 297 

Child Welfare Services Certificate 297 

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate 297 

Mental Health Interventions Certificate Program 304 

Teacher Education Certifications 305 

Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 306 

Geriatric Care Manager Professional Certificate 306 

Teaching English as a Second Language Certificate 307 

Gerontology Certificate 309 

Health Care Informatics Certificate 309 

Post-master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate 309 

Post-master's Nursing Education Certificate 309 

Post-professional Pediatric Certificate 309 

College of Health Sciences 309 

Spanish Language Certificate Program 309 

Specializations 312 



Addictions Counseling 312 

Child Welfare Services 312 

Gerontology 312 

Health Care Informatics Health Care Management Major 312 

' Health Care Management Health Care Management Major 312 

Health Care Marketing Health Care Management Major 312 

IT Security Information Technology Major 312 

Management Information Systems Information Technology Major 312 

Pre-dentistry, Pre-medicine, Pre-optometry, Pre-veterinary Medicine 313 

English, Pre-law 313 

History, Pre-law 313 

Philosophy, Pre-law 313 

Graduate Programs 313 

Contacts for Graduate Programs 313 

Financial Aid Information 314 

Financial Assistance Programs 315 

Admission Requirements 316 

Tuition Payment Options 316 

Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 317 

Philosophy 317 

Graduate Education Goals 317 

Policies and Procedures 318 

Graduate Accreditation 323 

Graduate Curricula 324 

Master of Business Administration 324 

Education 330 

Teaching English as a Second Language Post-baccalaureate Certificate 345 

Nursing 345 

Occupational Therapy Post-Professional Programs 360 

Program Goals 367 

Admissions 367 

Admission criteria are: 367 

Organizational Management 372 

Physical Therapy 383 

Speech-language Pathology 405 

Admission of Students with Baccalaureates Other than SLP 405 

Advancement within the Graduate Portion of the SLP Program 406 

Directory 408 

Misericordia University Board of Trustees 408 

Administration 409 

Faculty Senate 412 

Graduate Council 413 

Faculty 413 

Adjunct Faculty 418 

Alumni Association Board of Directors 2008-2009 420 

Index 423 



Academic Calendar 2008-2009 



Fall 2008 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Fri, Sat, Sun 

Sunday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Friday 

Friday 

Thur-Fri 

Monday 

Monday 

Mon-Fri 

Monday 

Mon-Fri 

Wednesday 

Tuesday 

Wed-Sun 

Monday 

Monday 

Monday 

Tues-Sat 

Monday 



August 20 
August 21 
August 22 
August 22-24 
August 24 
August 25 
August 29 
September 1 
September 2 
September 5 
September 19 
October 9-10 
October 13 
October 13 
October 20-24 
October 27 
November 3-7 
November 12 
November 25 
November 26-30 
December 1 
December 8 
December 8 
December 9-13 
December 15 



Spring 2009 



Monday 

Friday 

Friday 

Friday 

Mon-Fri 

Monday 

Monday 

Mon-Fri 

Tuesday 

Mon-Fri 

Wednesday 

Thur-Mon 

Tuesday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 



January 12 
January 16 
January 16 
February 6 
March 2-6 
March 9 
March 9 
March 9-13 
March 17 
March 23-27 
April 8 
April 9-13 
April 14 
April 28 
April 29 
April 30 



Orientation for new faculty 

All university meeting 

Convocation 

First-year orientation/check-in 

All university check-in 

First day of classes for all students 

Add period ends 4:30 pm 

Labor Day; No day or evening classes 

Classes resume 8:00 am 

Last day to remove summer 2008 incompletes 

Drop period ends 4:30 pm 

Fall recess 

Classes resume 8:00 am 

Mid-term grades due 8:30 am 

Advisement week 

Last day to withdraw from a course or university 

Registration spring 2009 

Writing proficiency exam 12-1:30 rooms TBA 

Follow Thursday class schedule 

Thanksgiving recess 

Classes resume 8:00 am 

Last day of classes; follow Friday class schedule 

Monday evening class exams held 

Final examinations 

Grades due 12:00 noon 



First day of classes for all students 

Add period ends 4:30 pm 

Last day to remove fall incompletes 

Drop period ends 4:30 pm 

Spring break 

Classes resume 8:00 am 

Mid-term grades due 8:30 am 

Advisement week 

Last day to withdraw from a course or university 

Registration fall 2009 

Writing proficiency exam 12-1:30 rooms TBA 

Easter Recess 

Classes resume 

Follow Thursday class schedule 

Last day of classes; Follow Friday class schedule 

Study day 



Academic Calendar 2008-2009 5 



Fri-Fri May 1-8 Final examinations 

Monday May 11 Grades due 8:30 am 

Saturday May 16 Baccalaureate and Commencement 



About Misericordia University 



Policy Statements 

This catalog contains current information regarding Misericordia University's undergraduate 
and graduate programs, calendar, admissions policies, degree requirements, fees, and 
regulations. Misericordia University reserves the right in its sole judgment to promulgate and 
change rules and regulations and to make changes of any kind in its programs, calendar, 
admissions policies, procedures and standards, degree requirements, and fees whenever it is 
deemed necessary or desirable, including changes in course content, the scheduling of 
classes, and cancellation of scheduled classes and other academic activities. 

Students are ultimately responsible for knowing and observing all regulations contained herein 
that may affect their status at Misericordia University. 

Misericordia University accords students of any race, color, religion, sex, nationality, or ethnic 
origin all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally made available to students of 
the university. Misericordia University does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, 
disability, religion, gender, nationality, marital status, sexual orientation, or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, 
athletic, or other university-administered programs. 

Misericordia University complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as 
amended. A copy of the Act is available for inspection in the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs Office. 

The university does not discriminate on the basis of disability in its hiring or employment 
practices. This notice is provided as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 



Mission Statement 

Misericordia University is a Catholic, liberal arts-based, co-educational university. It was 
founded in 1924 and it is sponsored by the Religious Sisters of Mercy. The university offers 
both undergraduate and graduate programs. In 1978, the board of trustees approved a 
mission statement that describes the nature and purpose of the university (formerly College 
Misericordia), and in 1994 it was revised as follows: 

Misericordia University, a co-educational Catholic university sponsored by the Institute 
of the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas, is committed to providing quality education to its 
students and to shaping its educational programs and policies to express the founding 
Sisters' values and attitudes of mercy, service, justice, and hospitality. The university 
welcomes individuals of all faiths. 

The academic development of each student at the undergraduate level is ensured by 
the university's commitment to provide a learning experience which cultivates higher- 
order thinking skills through the integration of liberal arts and professional studies. To 
emphasize academic excellence and to develop critical thinking, all undergraduate 
curricula provide a common liberal arts base, the objectives of which are further 



About Misericordia University 



developed in the students' major areas of study. The students' educational programs 
prepare them for productive careers and continued personal and professional growth 

Graduate programs at Misericordia University emphasize intellectual discourse and 
focused academic growth. The cornerstone of each program is instruction and practice 
in methods of critical thinking which promote research and enhanced professional 
expertise. 

As part of its comprehensive educational program, the university is committed to 
providing a wide range of spiritual, physical, recreational, social, and cultural activities in 
which all members of the university community can participate. 

Misericordia University fosters a cooperative environment in which students, faculty, and 
staff demonstrate personal concern for each individual as a valued member of the 
university community. 

Diversity Statement 

Misericordia University recognizes the importance of living the mission in our words and our 
deeds, demonstrating mercy, service, justice, and hospitality, and supporting the ideals of a 
democratic society. Therefore, we are dedicated to promoting a diverse community in an 
atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation of difference. 

We believe, as members of a democratic society, that individuals have not only the right to live 
their lives according to their own values and beliefs, but also the obligation to respect the right 
of others to do the same. 

We believe all people should be treated with civility, deserving to be heard without demeaning 
judgments of others. 

We believe, as an educational community, that we have the responsibility to learn about each 
other in order to benefit from our diverse population. 

We believe our demonstration of individual integrity and mutual respect sets a standard for the 
community and exemplifies a broader commitment to human understanding and service. 

Accreditations 

Misericordia University was chartered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on January 31 , 
1927, and is empowered to grant the following degrees: 

Doctor of Occupational Therapy 

Doctor of Physical Therapy 

Masters of Business Administration 

Master of Science 

Master of Science in Nursing 

Master of Science in Occupational Therapy 

Master of Science in Physical Therapy 

Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology 

Bachelor of Arts 

Bachelor of Science 

Bachelor of Science in Nursing 

Bachelor of Social Work 

Associate of Applied Sciences 



About Misericordia University / 



Misericordia University is regionally accredited by the 

Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 
19104, (267)284-5000 

The university is also officially recognized by the following accrediting agencies: 

Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, 4720 Montgomery Lane, 
Bethesda, MD 20814-3425, (301)652-6611 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education, American Physical 
Therapy Association, 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 (800) 999- 
2782 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 1361 
Park St., Clearwater, FL 33756, (727) 210-2350 

Commission on College Nursing Education, One DuPont Circle, NW, Suite 350, 
Washington, DC 20036-1120, (202) 887-6791 

Council on Social Work Education, 1725 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 683- 
8080 

International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education, IACBE, PO Box 3960, 
Olathe, KS 66063, (913) 631-3009 

Pennsylvania Department of Education, 333 Market St., Harrisburg, PA 17126 (717) 
783-6788 

The Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker 
Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL (312) 704-5300 

Misericordia University has legal permission from the Pennsylvania State Board of Nurse 
Examiners to operate a school of nursing in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Various 
other state education departments also recognize the university's academic programs. 

Misericordia University does not discriminate on the basis of sex in admission to or 
employment in its education programs or activities. Inquiries concerning the application of Title 
IX and its implementing regulations may be referred to our Title IX coordinator, Pamela 
Parsnik. The coordinator can be reached at 301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA 18612, (570) 674- 
6310, or at pparsnik@misericordia.edu 

Contacts for More Information 

For more information on particular aspects of Misericordia University, contact the people listed 
below at (570) 674-6400 (toll-free at 866-262-6363) between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm. Other 
university personnel are listed in the university directory section of this catalog. Address all 
mail for faculty and administration to: Misericordia University, 301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA 
18612-1090. 

Academic Affairs Dr. Mari P. King, Vice President of Academic Affairs 

Undergraduate Admissions Jane Dessoye, Executive Director of Enrollment Management 

Admissions Glenn Bozinski, Director of Admissions 

Center for Adult and Thomas J. O'Neill, Dean of the Center for Adult and Continuing 

Continuing Education Education 

Athletics David Martin, Athletic Director 

Business Matters John Risboskin, Vice President of Finance and Administration 



About Misericordia University 



Graduate Services 

University Advancement 
Learning Resource Center 
Registrar's Office 
Campus Ministry 

Student Life 

Institute of Law and Religious Life 
Institute on Sacred Scripture 
The Diversity Institute 

The Ethics Institute 



Thomas J. O'Neill, Dean of the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education 

Susan M. Helwig, Vice President of University Advancement 

Amy Lahart, Interim Director of Learning Resource Center 

Edward Lahart, Registrar 

Reverend Donald Williams, Chaplain 

Christine Somers, Director of Campus Ministry 

Jean Messaros, RSM, Vice President of Student Affairs 

Kathleen Foley, Dean of Students 

Dr. Cecilia Meighan, RSM, Executive Director 

Dr. Noel Keller, RSM, Executive Director 

Dr. Linda Trompetter, Special Assistant to the President 

Scott Richardson, Associate Director of the Diversity Institute 

Dr. Charles Zola, Director 



Student Support Services 



Bookstore 

The campus bookstore is an academically oriented resource, where the need for, and interest 
in, reading and study engendered in the classroom can be supported and reinforced. It is also 
an on-campus source of many goods and services required by a university community. The 
main purpose of the campus bookstore is to provide for the sale of books and supply 
requirements connected with the academic programs of the university. 

Computer Facilities 

All facets of the hardware and software environment are upgraded and expanded to enable 
our students to keep pace with technology. Students have ample access to personal 
computers throughout the campus. Over 100 personal computers are available for use 
including: 21 laptops in the library, 6 laptops for commuters, 14 computers in the residence 
halls, and four computer labs containing 67 computers. Wireless access is provided in both the 
library and Banks Student Life Center. In addition, there is a wireless computer teaching lab 
for up to 21 students in the library. Each computer has Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Access. 
Powerpoint) available. All residence halls are wired providing each student with his/her own 
connection to the campus network. The labs are wired for connection to the campus network 
and Internet as well. Students are provided with a portal account by which they will have 
access to an e-mail account, calendar, current semester courses, clubs and committees, their 
own personal headlines, and are able to receive personal and campus announcements. Also, 
students are able to access their current semester grades, academic record, profile 
information, billing data, and class schedule, and register for courses online. The student 
technology help desk handles all commuter/residential student computer problems, residential 
internet connections, cable TV, and campus phone line issues. The help desk also provides 
one free antivirus program for each resident student's computer. 

Software and programming languages include SPSS, Java, Visual Basic, C++, C#, Cobol and 
Assembler. 

Counseling Center 

Counseling center services are available to all undergraduate and graduate students. Services 
include individual and group counseling, consultation and referral services, and crisis 
intervention. Counselors also offer workshops on a variety of personal development topics and 



Student Support Services 9 



issues throughout the academic year. All services are free of charge and all counseling 
contacts are confidential. Records of counseling contacts are kept separate from a student's 
medical or academic records. 

The focus of counseling services is on personal and life development. Some common issues 
addressed through services typically include problems such as stress management, test and 
general anxiety, depression, eating issues, substance abuse, and relationship and family 
problems. Students who present with issues that need a more intensive, long-term treatment 
approach are offered off-campus referral sources where their needs can be more adequately 
addressed. 

The counseling staff includes a licensed psychologist, a master's level licensed professional 
counselor, a certified addictions specialist, a registered dietitian consultant, graduate interns, 
student peer advocates, and peer educators. The counseling center is located on the ground 
floor of McGowan Hall. The hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm and by appointment. Appointments 
may be made by calling 570-674-6408 or dropping by the center. Evening and weekend 
appointments are available as needed. A counselor is available 24 hours a day for 
emergencies. Students may access a counselor on call after hours by contacting the Campus 
Safety office at 570-674-6300 or by making the request through a resident assistant (RA). 
Students do not have to identify the reason for requesting the counselor on call. 

Faculty, staff, and students who wish to refer a student for counseling services or consult 
about a student may contact the director, Dr. Cindy March, at 570-674-6366, or in the case of 
immediate need, may walk the student to the center to access a counselor. 

Learning Resource Center 

The learning resource center offers services to students who wish to improve the quality of 
their learning. The center offers comprehensive support services through the following 
programs: peer and professional tutoring, study skill support and workshops. Individual study 
skills and learning strategy assessment and intervention services are offered as well as 
developmental intervention programs for students on academic probation or for those who are 
not satisfied with their level of performance. The center is located in the lower level of 
Alumnae Hall. All services are free of charge. 



Library 



The Mary Kintz Bevevino Library is located at the heart of the campus between Mercy Hall and 
McHale Residence Hall. The library is named in honor of alumna Mary Kintz Bevevino, a 1987 
graduate of Misericordia University. Dedicated in 1999, the Bevevino Library is a state-of-the- 
art research facility with wireless internet access, computers, and a variety of study 
environments. 

The mission of the Mary Kintz Bevevino Library is to provide informational and instructional 
support to the Misericordia University Community. The library provides resources, services, 
and facilities in support of the university's mission of providing quality academics, professional 
preparation, and service leadership. 

The collection of the Mary Kintz Bevevino Library is classified using the Dewey Decimal 
Classification System. The library home page (www.miserJcordia.edu/library), provides 
access to the library's online catalog, research databases and library services. The library 
offers casual seating, study carrels and tables throughout the building and group study rooms 
on the second and third floors. The main circulating collection is on the first and third floors. 
The circulation desk, multimedia room, and the Alden Trust Computer Classroom are located 



1 Library 



on the first floor. The second floor of the library houses the reference desk, the reference and 
periodicals collections, and the Center for Nursing History. The Sister Mary Carmel McGangle 
Archives and the Catherine Evans McGowan Room are on the third floor. The Catherine 
Evans McGowan Room is used for seminars, multimedia presentations, community meetings, 
and other group activities. 

The library offers information in a variety of formats including books, periodicals, electronic 
databases, microfilm, and audio and video recordings. The library houses over 70,000 print 
volumes, periodicals and microfilms, and an expanding collection of electronic resources 
Trained reference staff are available to provide research assistance. Individuals may request 
additional assistance by appointment, and faculty are encouraged to bring classes to the 
library for research instruction. The library schedules tours and group tutorials on specific 
databases or general bibliographic instruction upon request. Laptop computers can be 
borrowed from the circulation desk and used throughout the library. A printer is available for 
wireless printing. 

The library's schedule accommodates the academic schedule of the university. A valid 
Misericordia University identification or library card is required to borrow library materials. The 
library extends borrowing privileges to Back Mountain residents and other members of the 
local community with participation in the Friends of the Library membership. 

Archives 

The Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle Archives is located on the third floor of the Mary Kintz 
Bevevino Library and is open to the public. The archives was created in 1990 and named for 
the founding archivist, Sister Mary Carmel McGarigle. The objective of the archives is to 
collect, preserve, and provide access to records pertaining to the history of Misericordia 
University (formerly College Misericordia), the university's founders the Sisters of Mercy, and 
the local community. The archives serves as a central resource for information collected about 
the diverse functions and historical records of Misericordia University offices, departments, 
campus organizations, and student activities. The archives contains over 1,000 linear feet of 
records and publications, and 50,000 photographic images. Archival collections are 
searchable through the Bevevino library online catalog. 

The archives has grown as a result of generous donations from students, alumni, and the 
university community. The archives actively collects paper and electronic records, 
photographs, scrapbooks, publications, interviews, recordings, and other university 
memorabilia that support the library's mission to better serve the needs of the university 
community. Contact the archivist at archives@misericordia.edu or visit the Archives Home 
Page at www.misericordia.edu/archives for more information. There are archival displays 
throughout the library and in other campus buildings. 



Campus Life 



Misericordia University students take their total educational experience seriously. They 
recognize that their academic experience is richer when they participate in co-curricular and 
extra-curricular activities which contribute to their total development. 

Athletics 

Intercollegiate athletics for women at Misericordia University include basketball, cheerleading, 
cross country running, field hockey, tennis, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming, track and 
field, and volleyball. Men compete at the intercollegiate level in baseball, basketball, 
cheerleading, cross country running, golf, lacrosse, soccer, swimming, tennis, and track and 
field. 



Campus Life 1 1 



Members of the student body, faculty, and administration enjoy a comprehensive intramural 
athletic program which includes such activities as co-ed flag football, soccer, basketball, 
volleyball, tennis, golf, and softball. 

Campus Ministry 

Misericordia University is a Catholic University. As such, it offers a variety of liturgical, service, 
and spiritual opportunities in which all members of the community can express their religious 
faith and grow in their values. Persons of all faith and religious denominations find the campus 
ministry program a focus for religious, spiritual, social and community service activities. 

In keeping with the University's Mercy tradition of justice, service, and hospitality, campus 
ministry sponsors a wide variety of programs that provide direct service to others. These 
programs offer students the opportunity to express their values and a chance to develop 
leadership potential. A creative liturgical program guides students in making the connection 
between daily life experiences and their relationship with God and humanity. Thus, the 
formation of personal spirituality, service to others and justice for those in need and worship 
become a part of an inclusive approach to spiritual development. 

Campus Safety 

The on-campus safety department operates 24-hours, seven days a week. All personnel are 
trained in basic emergency procedures such as first aid, CPR, and cardiac defibrillation. 
Safety officers are accessible to students and provide advice and literature to support a safe 
and comfortable campus for all students. 

Clubs and Organizations 

Over 35 chartered student clubs and organizations provide opportunities for personal, 
intellectual, and social development in a wide variety of student interests. These activities 
include such options as educational workshops, musical attractions, publications, and 
performing art shows, among others. 

Services offered through the student activities department include leadership development 
programs, SOAR (Student Outdoor Adventure and Recreation) new student orientation 
programs, activities information, resources for programming and fundraising, a weekly bulletin, 
and the semester activities calendar. 

Governing Boards 

Student Government Association 

An active undergraduate Student Government Association (SGA) is the liaison between 
students and faculty, and between students and administration. The SGA enables students to 
become involved in a decision making process which affect their governance. The SGA 
consists of eight executive board members. 

The Commuter Council 

The Commuter Council is attentive to the needs and concerns of non-resident undergraduate 
students. The council addresses both the academic and social aspects of college life for 
commuters. 






Campus Life 



Residential Facilities 

The university operates seven residential facilities: Gildea Hall, McHale Hall. Alumnae Hall. 
McGowan Hall, an 18-unit townhouse complex, and one house off campus on Lake Street. 
Gildea Hall is for upper class students. Co-ed by unit, students live in three-, six-, or seven- 
person suites. McHale Hall, our first year area, is co-ed by floor/wing. Alumnae Hall houses 
both first-year and upper class residents. McGowan Hall includes standard room, double 
occupancy units for upper class residents. The townhouses are for upper class students and 
are self-contained units with kitchen facilities. They are co-ed by unit, and each houses six 
residents. 

The environment in the residential areas is one of living and learning. A vital part of the 
student's total educational experiences is the relationships that develop from living and 
sharing with others in the residence halls. Resident students participate in making decisions 
affecting their environment, and are assisted by the residence life staff members who work in 
unison with the students to maintain an environment conducive to academic success and 
personal growth. Each building also offers study rooms, laundry facilities, cable television, 
phone services, Internet access, and recreational lounges. Rooms are furnished with beds, 
desks, bureaus and closets and are conveniently located to other areas of campus. 



Student Communications 

Students contribute to the programing and management of Cougar Radio, the campus radio 
station, which streams worldwide at www.cougarradio.net. The Highlander, the award-winning 
campus newspaper, is published by a student staff bi-weekly during the fall and spring 
semesters. The online version is updated weekly and is available at www.highlandernews.net. 
during the school year as well and is updated weekly. The literary magazine, Instress, is 
published each spring semester. It contains thought-provoking short stories, poetry, essays, 
art, photography, music, and other creative works from students and faculty. 



Student Health Center 

The student health center, located on the lower level of the Anderson Sports/Health Center, is 
directed by a registered nurse with a master's degree. The director and a part-time registered 
nurse function under the guidance of the university's medical physician. The health center also 
has one nurse practitioner on staff. Health care providers have regularly scheduled clinic 
hours on campus. Health care providers also are available by telephone for advice and 
referrals during the week. The center is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. If 
medical services are needed after hours, the student should contact their respective resident 
advisor (RA) who will when necessary, inform the director of the health center of the issue. 

Services provided by the health care providers at the student health center are free to the 
student population. Prescription medication may be obtained at one of four local pharmacies. 
Prescription expenses, at one pharmacy, may be billed to the student's home address. 

The health center is a state-of-the-art facility providing first aid, and assessment and treatment 
of common illnesses. Referral for more serious health conditions; temporary care until transfer 
can be arranged to local medical facility; residence hall visits when necessary; health 
counseling and education; maintenance of health records; and, assistance with student 
athletic insurance claims are provided at no cost to the student. 

The health center requires a medical history, physical examination, and immunization records 
to be completed and submitted by all new, transfer and commuter students before the start of 
the student's first semester of attendance. It is required by PA Law that all students receive 
memomune (meningitis), hepatitis B, MMR 2 and current PPD immunizations prior to 
beginning their university career. Students enrolled in health science majors (nursing, physical 



Campus Life 1 3 



therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, medical imaging, and sonography) 
may have additional yearly requirements as mandated by their respective departments. 

Students requiring hospitalization or those afflicted with acute or long-term illness that requires 
several days in bed and restriction from class will be required to return to their homes at the 
discretion of the health care provider and director of the health center until activity and class 
attendance can be resumed. For the safety of all students, it is required that students 
diagnosed with a communicable disease (such as measles, chicken pox) will be sent home. 
Permission to return to campus must be provided in writing from the student's health care 
provider. 

The health center's self-care room is designed as a teaching model to encourage 
independence in the student population. Brochures, educational displays and videos are 
available for student instruction. Limited over-the-counter medications are available free of 
charge. 

The student health center counsels on personal issues and provides informational materials to 
help students assess and to participate in their own health care. This includes, but is not 
limited to: breast self exams, urinary tract, menstrual and gynecological problems. Counseling 
about anxiety over possible to exposure to STD's and/or HIV is available for men and women 
with possible referrals to professional counselors if necessary. Appointments with a health 
care provider can be arranged by calling 570-674-6276. 

Additional services are also available. They include nursing assessment, treatment and follow 
ups; referral to specialists; arrangement of medical appointments and testing; physical exams; 
assistance with dispensing or injection of medication; and medical equipment for short term 
use (ice bags, crutches, heating pads, vaporizers, and ace bandages). Students will be billed 
for materials not returned to the health center by the end of the semester. 

All full-time students are required annually to enroll in a university health insurance plan or 
provide photocopied proof of membership in their parent's health insurance plan. Information 
about a university health insurance plan is available at the office of the vice president of 
student affairs. 

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER HOURS 

Monday through Friday 9:00 am - 5:00pm 

NURSE PRACTITIONER HOURS 

Monday and Thursday 9:30am - 1 1 :00am 

CLINIC HOURS (Physician available) 

Wednesday and Thursday 11:30am - 12:30pm 

PHONE (570)674-6276 



Campus Life 



Career and Placement Services 



Insalaco Center for Career Development 

Preparing for a successful future demands more than just obtaining a quality education Truly 
successful students begin to develop career planning competency as first-year students and 
build upon this throughout their academic and professional lives. The Insalaco Center for 
Career Development provides the resources and assistance necessary to turn academic 
achievement into career opportunity. 

Recognizing that the world of work requires life-long learning, the Insalaco Center promotes 
the development of short-range goals ?s part of long-range career plans. This approach helps 
ensure that students build flexibility into their career plans. The Center serves all University 
students and alumni with its state-of-the-art career resource library and team of professional 
staff. The mission of the Center is to prepare students for employment, graduate school or 
professional school and to manage their careers throughout their working lives. 

The Insalaco Center coordinates the Guaranteed Placement Program, which is designed to 
connect students' academic and co-curricular learning in order to position them for success in 
today's, and tomorrow's, job markets. 

The Center provides the following services: 

Individual career consultations 

The Choice Program for undeclared students 

Career assessment 

Non-curriculum required experiential education (shadowing, internship, externship, 

part-time, and summer jobs) 

Mentoring opportunities 

Graduate and professional school advising 

Employment skill development and training 

Recruitment services 

Study abroad advising 

Work-study placements on campus 

A career resource library housing hundreds of print and technical career development 

resources. 



Special Institutes 



The Diversity Institute 

The Diversity Institute is an educational resource center which works collaboratively with 
community members to promote multi-cultural understanding and to eliminate prejudice and 
discrimination. Its mission is educational, and its programs have been shared with a host of 
area organizations. 

The Ethics Institute 

The Ethics Institute of Northeastern Pennsylvania, located on campus, is directed by 15 
community leaders and educators who organize forums, workshops, and symposia dealing 



Career and Placement Services 1 5 



with a broad range of ethical topics. The institute also provides information and fosters open 
discussion of complex ethical topics. 

Institute of Law and Religious Life 

The Institute of Law and Religious Life, for those in leadership in Catholic religious orders, 
offers professional development and practical information in canon and civil law as well as 
new perspectives on the responsibilities of leadership. 

Institute on Sacred Scripture 

The Institute on Sacred Scripture relates to those of all educational backgrounds with the 
simplicity and elegance of the scriptures themselves. This six-day program marked its 40th 
anniversary in 2008. Each summer, internationally known scholars make presentations and 
lead discussion on biblical topics. 



Undergraduate Programs 



Admission Requirements 

General Admission, Full-time First-year Students 

Misericordia University encourages applications from those who seek a strong liberal arts base 
for their chosen baccalaureate education, and who present evidence of the ability and desire 
to pursue an academic program of study. 

Candidates for general admission are reviewed on a rolling admission basis by the committee 
on admissions. The decision to admit a student is based on the student's intended field of 
study and on an evaluation of the student's qualifications. An applicant for admission who 
wishes to enter the first-year student class should provide the Admissions Office with the 
following: 

1 . Hard copy or electronic (www.misericordia.edu) application for admission with non- 
refundable $25 fee. The application fee is waived for applicants who have visited 
campus. 

2. Official copy of the secondary school transcript forwarded to the director of admissions 
by the guidance department of the secondary school. The transcript should indicate 
that the candidate has completed, or is in the process of completing, at least 16 
Carnegie Units. The transcript should include current semester courses and all 
pertinent information regarding the student's educational background. Students who 
have secured a high school equivalency diploma will also be considered for admission, 
and must submit a copy of their GED (General Education Development) test. 

3. Test results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination 
Board or the American College Testing (ACT) Program are generally required for 
admission. Waiving of test requirements is made only by written permission from the 
Director of Admissions. 

4. A written recommendation from the high school principal, guidance counselor, or 
teacher is encouraged. For applicants to the occupational therapy (OT) program, two 
letters of recommendation and documentation of ten hours of service in an OT setting 
are also required. For occupational therapy and speech-language pathology 
applicants, a 500-word essay on their professional interested is also required. 



1 6 Undergraduate Programs 



Although personal interviews are not normally required, applicants are strongly encouraged to 
arrange for a personal interview and tour. 

Incoming full-time students who wish to enroll at Misericordia University for either the fall or 
spring semester must submit a non-refundable reservation deposit of $300 Normally, 
reservation deposits should be made within six weeks of notification of acceptance When 
needed, requests for extensions to the deposit deadline may be submitted to the Office of 
Admissions. 

Transfer Program 

Transfer Students without an Associate Degree 

Misericordia University welcomes students who wish to transfer from other accredited four- 
year colleges or universities, or two-year junior or community colleges. Prospective full-time 
transfer students are encouraged to arrange an interview with the admissions office to review 
academic status and proposed curriculum. Prospective part-time transfer students are 
encouraged to arrange an interview with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

Prospective transfer students will be considered for admission if they have maintained a 
cumulative GPA (grade point average) of 2.0 or better (based on a 4.0 system). Higher GPA 
may be required to specific majors. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 30 credits 
at Misericordia University. The university will accept no more than 60 credits from any single 
or combination of two year institution(s). Only grades of C or better from an accredited, 
degree-granting institution will be accepted for transfer credit. The Registrar, however, 
reserves the right to award or withhold credit. GPA requirements for advancement into the 
professional level of individual programs vary (see individual curriculum guides for each 
program.) Candidates who meet the GPA requirements for general admission and who seek 
advanced standing for previous college work must provide the director of admissions with the 
following: 

1 . Application for Admission with a non-refundable $25 fee. 

2. Official copy of secondary school transcript or GED test results. 

3. Official transcripts from each college/university previously attended where credit has 
been earned. 

Credit for course transfer will be awarded for those courses that are equivalent to ones offered 
at Misericordia University. Other transfer credits may be accepted as elective credit. Grades 
earned at other institutions are not included in the student's GPA at Misericordia University. 
Please refer to the section below for specific information, which applies to students 
transferring with an associate degree. 

Transfer Students from Non-accredited Institutions 

In accordance with regulatory bodies, students seeking credit for work completed at a college 
or university that is not accredited by one of the six regional accrediting commissions in the 
United States but has been licensed by a state board of education to award an associated 
degree or higher may have their credit accepted on a course by course evaluation completed 
by the university registrar in consultation with the appropriate department chair(s) . 

Transferring with an Associate Degree to a Four-year Program 

No student admitted to a four-year program with an equivalent major will be required to 
complete more than 66 credits at Misericordia University if the student has at least 60 
transferable credits. Equivalent means that in the process of transcript evaluation, some 
courses from the associate degree can be transferred as required major courses in the four- 
year program to which the student is admitted. If the combined requirements of the core and 



Undergraduate Programs 1 7 



major exceed 66 credits, and if the associate degree is equivalent to the intended major as 
determined by the registrar the following will apply: 

1 . Priority will be given to the major requirements; 

2. In distributing other core curriculum requirements, consideration will be given to 
enriching the student's liberal education and complementing core equivalencies 
completed as part of the associate degree. In this case, determination of appropriate 
core courses will be done by the student's advisor in consultation with the Registrar; 

3. If it is possible within the 66-credit stipulation, students may complete the core 
curriculum as required either directly or by reasonable substitution through transferred 
credit as prescribed by the Misehcordia University Registrar in the course of transcript 
evaluation. In some cases, approved substitute courses may fulfill requirements of 
both core and major. 

4. The addition of a double major, a minor, a concentration, change of major certification, 
or an area of emphasis may require additional credits be completed. 

Misericordia University maintains general articulation agreements with Luzerne County 
Community College, Lackawanna College, Northampton Community College and Lehigh 
Carbon Community College, as well as the following program-specific articulation agreements: 

With Luzerne County Community College 

• Associate in Science Degree in General Studies to Master of Science in Occupational 
Therapy 

• Associate in Science Degree in General Studies to Bachelor of Science in Medical 
Imaging 

• Associate in Science Degree in Business Administration to Bachelor of Science in 
Sport Management 

• Associate in Science Degree in Education to Bachelor of Science in Elementary 
Education and Special Education 

• Associate in Science Degree in Cyber Security Management to Bachelor of Science in 
Information Technology 

With Lackawanna College 

• Associate in Arts in Communication Arts to Bachelor of Arts in Communications 

• Associate in Science in Sport Management to Bachelor of Science in Sport 
Management 

With Keystone College 

• Associate in Applied Science in Allied Health (Radiologic Technology) to Bachelor of 
Science in Medical Imaging 

• Associate in Applied Science in Allied Health (Nursing) to Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing 

With Lehigh Carbon Community College 

• Associate in Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant to Master's of Science 
in Occupational Therapy 

• Associate in Science in Sport Management to Bachelor of Science in Sport 
Management 

• Computer Science Associate in Science and Computer Specialist Associate in Applied 
Science Degrees to Bachelor of Science in Information Technology 



1 8 Undergraduate Programs 



With Pennsylvania College of Technology 

• Associate in Applied Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant to Master's of Science 
in Occupational Therapy 

With the Commonwealth College of the Pennsylvania State University 

• Associate in Science in Physical Therapist Assistant to Master's of Science in Physical 
Therapy 

Transferring with an Associate Degree to a Five-year pr Six-year Program 
Transfer students with an associate degree in Occupational Therapist Assistant (OTA) and 
Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) should refer to the admissions section of the program to 
which they are applying, which appears later in this catalog. 

Part-time Students 

Students who wish to be accepted to Misericordia University on a part-time basis in either the 
accelerated degree program (evening/weekend); the Expressway Program at Hazleton, 
Nanticoke, Scranton or Tannersville; or the semester format should first contact the Center for 
Adult and Continuing Education for a personal interview. Curriculum requirements, relevant 
university policies, the process for transfer credit evaluation, and financial aid referral will be 
explained in detail at that time. 

Although part-time students may begin their studies on a non-matriculating basis, they are 
expected to apply for formal admission to the university at the earliest possible date. Non- 
matriculated students are limited to earning 15 credits at the university unless special 
arrangements have been approved. Students applying for part-time admission to the university 
must: 

1 . Complete a part-time student application form. Submit a non-refundable $25 fee with 
the form. 

2. Send two official transcripts from each college/university previously attended to the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education and Community Service. 

3. Send one copy of secondary school (high school) transcript (or GED) to the Center for 
Adult and Continuing Education if this is the first time attending college. 

4. Registered nurses must send transcripts from their diploma-granting institution, as well 
as a copy of the RN license to the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

Upon receipt of the application for admission, the secondary school record/transcript or post- 
secondary transcripts (if applicable), and the appropriate recommendations, the Center for 
Adult and Continuing Education and department faculty review the applicant's portfolio. 
Applicants are notified by mail of the admission decision usually within three weeks. Certain 
programs have specific requirements for acceptance. Applicants are referred to the description 
of programs, which appears earlier in the catalog. 

Courses, which apply to the student's field of study, will be evaluated by the Misericordia 
University's Registrar on a course by course comparison and are subject to approval by the 
department chair in consultation with the registrar. 



Other Undergraduate Admission Information 

International Students 

Misericordia University welcomes students from all nations. Students for whom English is not 
their first language must demonstrate language proficiency. Misericordia University's 
Admissions Office can help students register for the Test of English as a Foreign Language 



Undergraduate Programs 1 9 



(TOEFL), which measures listening and reading comprehension as well as written expression. 
Because Misericordia University does not offer English as a Second Language (ESL) 
programs, it is essential that the student demonstrate a mastery of the language sufficient to 
perform college-level work. 

Home Schooled Students 

Misericordia University welcomes applications from home-schooled students. To apply, home- 
schooled students must submit a completed application for admission with a $25 application 
fee (application fee is waived for visitors to campus), a copy of the SAT or ACT score and, 
when applicable, a copy of the high school transcript (which can be obtained through the home 
school association). If the applicant is not affiliated with a specific organization, the university 
will accept a transcript from the home-schooling parent which shows course work completed 
and grades achieved. A General Education Development (GED) test is not required. 

Early Admission 

Students who have completed their junior year in high school with an outstanding record of 

achievement may apply for early admission to Misericordia University. 

Advanced Placement 

Students who have participated in the College Entrance Examination Board college-level 
testing program may be granted academic credit at Misericordia University. The decision to 
award college credit in these cases is made by the registrar and the department sponsoring 
the course for which credit is requested. 

Readmission 

Students in good academic and disciplinary standing who have withdrawn from Misericordia 
University and wish to re-enroll within one calendar year of their withdrawal must notify the 
admissions office, the vice president of academic affairs and the chair of the academic 
department to which they hope to return. Readmission to the university does not automatically 
imply readmission to the student's former program. If a student wishes to return to the 
university in a different department than the one in which the student was enrolled at the time 
of withdrawal, the student must make formal application to that department through the 
admissions office. 

Students who have been academically dismissed from a specific academic program but not 
from the university should consult academic department policies and procedures for specific 
eligibility requirements for readmission. The readmission process for students who have been 
academically dismissed from the university must include an interview with, and favorable 
recommendation from, the chair of the department to which the student is applying. In the case 
of disciplinary dismissal or a withdrawal for personal reasons, the matter will be referred to the 
vice president of student affairs. In all cases, readmission to the university does not imply 
readmission to one's former academic program. 



20 Undergraduate Programs 



Financial Information 



Tuition and Fees 

The following charges are for one semester, unless otherwise noted, during the 2008-2009 
academic year. 

Generally, all tuition and fees, with the exception of financial aid award amounts, are to be 
paid in full at the beginning of each semester/term unless special arrangements are made with 
the student accounts office. Interest is charged on unpaid balances. 

Expenses per Semester 2008-2009 

Regular Tuition $10,995 Full-time students (12-17 credits) 

Regular Tuition $450 Part-time students per credit 

Full-time students who wish to take more than 17 credits 
will be charged for additional credits at $450/credit. 

Medical technology majors will be charged $225 per 
semester in lieu of tuition during the semesters spent in 
hospital practica. Those students are also assessed the 
general fee. 



Expressway Tuition $320 

General Fee $580 

(full-time students) 



Expressway students per credit (see description of 
Expressway Program , page 57) 

The general fee and its related services help to promote 
and enhance the educational, recreational, social, and 
cultural life of the student body. The fee helps to 
supplement the cost of class dues, student publications, 
student services, and student government as well as the 
costs associated with operating facilities available for 
student use such as the Anderson Sports-Health Center, 
the Bevevino Library, and the Banks Student Center. 



Regular Campus 
Housing 



Single Room 
Townhouse Room 



$2,795 Alumnae Hall 

$2,795 McHale Hall 

$2,825 Gildea Hall 

$2,855 Lake Street House 

$500 Based on seniority at the time of housing lottery 

$3,250 Provisions for single/private rooms are under the 

discretion of the Director of Residence Life 

Should vacancies occur in a student room, the remaining 
student is required to accept another roommate or be 
reassigned to another room. Students in suites or 
townhouses must maintain the stated minimum 
occupancy or be removed from the area. If availability 
permits, the Director of Residence Life may provide an 
option to maintain the room, suite, or townhouse below 
the minimum stated occupancy. When this situation 



Financial Information 2 1 



Board Plans 



$1,925 



265 meals 


$2180 




$2130 




$2080 




$2030 


190 meals 


$1980 




$1930 




$1880 




$1830 


125 meals 


$1775 




$1725 




$1675 




$1625 


75 meals 


$1275 




$1225 




$1175 




$1125 



occurs, all remaining occupants of the room, suite, or 
townhouse will be subject to an additional room charge of 
$300 beyond the rates stated above. 

Each plan provides the specified number of meals per 
semester with the added convenience of an optional 
amount of Cougar Points that can be used in the dining 
room, Cougar's Den or Mercy Hall. 

First-year residents may not choose the 125 or 75 meal 
plans. The 75 meal plan is only available to students 
living in theme housing or a townhouse. 

Includes $205 Cougar Points 

Includes $155 Cougar Points 

Includes $105 Cougar Points 

Includes $55 Cougar Points 

Includes $205 Cougar Points 

Includes $155 Cougar Points 

Includes $105 Cougar Points 

Includes $55 Cougar Points 

Includes $205 Cougar Points 

Includes $155 Cougar Points 

Includes $105 Cougar Points 

Includes $55 Cougar Points 

Includes $205 Cougar Points 

Includes $155 Cougar Points 

Includes $105 Cougar Points 

Includes $55 Cougar Points 



Special Fees, Deposits, and Expenses 2008-2009 

Graduation Fee $150 A graduation fee is charged to students who have 

completed degree requirements. 

The fee helps to supplement costs of commencement 
including preparation of the facility, graduation 
announcements, cap and gown, diploma, pre- 
commencement luncheon and the post-commencement 
reception. 

Liability Insurance $50 For students enrolled in majors that require clinical or 

field experience 



99 



Financial Information 



Orientation Fee $200 

$70 
Parking Fines $10 



Parking Permit 


$25 


Returned Check 


$15 


Fee 





Room Reservation 



Student ID 

Student Teaching 
Fee 

Summer Housing 



$100 

$20 
$200 

$75 



Transcript Fee 
Weekend College 



$7 
$200 



First year 

Transfer student 

Per infraction for vehicles registered with the Misencordia 
University's Campus Safety Department. Unregistered 
vehicles will be charged $20 per infraction. Fines for 
illegally parking in handicapped areas are $50 per 
infraction. Failure to move a vehicle as instructed during 
times of snow removal will result in a fine of $100. 

Annual fee 

A fee will be assessed for each check not accepted and 
returned by the bank. Two returned checks will cause 
check-writing privileges to be permanently revoked. 

Room reservation deposit is for upperclassmen only; 
room deposit is payable by April 15 and is applied to room 
charges. 

Replacement of lost, stolen or unusable ID 

For Education major in teaching placements 



Per week for students who take five or fewer credits. 
Summer housing is available at no cost to students who 
are registered for six or more credits in a non-weekend 
program, have signed a campus housing agreement for 
the 2008-2009 academic year, and who live outside of 
the greater Wilkes-Barre/Scranton metropolitan area. 
There is also no cost for students who are employed at 
the university for the summer and who live outside of the 
greater Wilkes-Barre/Scranton metropolitan area. 

Per transcript 

Room rental per semester 



Additional Class Specific Fees 
Applied Music $100 



Students enrolled in all sections of Fine Arts 117 



Medical Imaging Fee (Annual) 
Sophomore $125 



Junior $95 

Senior (Dec grads) $95 
Senior (May grads) $75 



The medical imaging fee covers the cost of annual film 
badges as well as ID marker, name tags, program 
handbook, clinical log book in the sophomore year and 
professional liability insurance in the sophomore, junior 
and senior years. 



Financial Information 23 



Nursing Fee (Annual) 
First-year 



$60 



Sophomore 


$35 


Junior 


$375 


Senior 


$285 


Post Professional 


$50 


Nursing 





The nursing fee covers the cost of annual Education 
Resource Inc. (ERI) testing at the Freshman, Junior and 
Senior levels. Junior and Senior level fees cover 
professional liability insurance and lab fees. Junior level 
fees also include charges for clinical badges and clinical 
kits. All levels are charged for membership in the Student 
Nurse Association of Pennsylvania (SNAP). 



Cost of annual professional liability insurance. 



Occupational Therapy (OT) Fee (Annual) 



First-year 



$55 



Sophomore 


$55 


Junior 


$375 


Senior 


$365 


Fifth-year 


$140 



The OT fee covers the cost of annual American 
Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) membership as 
well as lab fees, clinical name badge and professional 
liability insurance in the junior and senior years, in addition 
to an online exam for certification preparation in the 
graduate year. 



Physical Therapy (PT) Fee (Annual) 

Junior $475 The PT fee covers the cost of annual American Physical 

Therapy Association (APTA) membership as well as junior 
and senior lab fees and professional liability insurance, 
junior lab kit, manual and clinical name badges 



Senior 
Fifth-year 



$400 
$135 



Sonography Fee (Annual) 
First-year $85 



Sophomore 



$75 



The Sonography fee covers the costs of name tag. 
handbook, clinical forms and professional liability 
insurance. 



24 Financial Information 



Speech-language Pathology (SLP) Fee (Annual) 

First-year $85 The SLP fee covers the cost of annual American Speech- 

Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and Pennsylvania 
Speech-Language-Heanng Association (PSHA) 
memberships as well as clinical name badges and 
professional liability insurance. 



Sophomore 


$100 


Junior 


$135 


Senior 


$135 


Fifth-year 


$135 



Release of Transcripts or Diplomas 

A diploma or transcript (official or unofficial) will not be released until the student's account is 
paid in full. The cost for each transcript is $7 and must be requested in writing to the registrar's 
office. 



Undergraduate Auditing 

Students may audit courses at one-half cost based on full- or part-time credit charges. No 
credit is awarded for audited courses. Auditors are admitted to courses as space is available 
Matriculating students who wish to audit a course must seek permission from the registrar. 



Financial Assistance Program 

For over 84 years, Misericordia University has helped students and parents afford a superior 
college education. Through its participation in federal and state financial aid programs, use of 
institutional resources and contributions by alumni and friends, the student financial services 
office tries to meet, as fully as possible, each student's financial need. 

The university is eligible to participate in a full range of financial aid programs through the U.S. 
Department of Education. Eligible students may qualify for aid through the Federal Pell Grant 
Program, and the Federal Family Education Loan Program, as well as federal campus-based 
programs including Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Perkins Loans, and the 
Federal Work-study Program. 

The university participates in the nursing loan program under the auspices of the Department 
of Health and Human Services. 

Misericordia University is also designated as an eligible institution by the Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA), allowing qualified students access to the 
Pennsylvania State Grant Program. 

In general, the university offers three types of financial assistance: 

1 . Scholarships/Grants: Gift aid given directly to full-time students based on financial 
need or some area of achievement, such as an outstanding academic record, 
evidence of leadership, etc. Students do not need to repay this type of award. 



Financial Information 25 



2. Loans: Monies borrowed by students to meet educational expenses. Students and/or 
their families repay these loans after withdrawal or graduation. Interest is charged on 
loans. Interest charges vary with different loan programs. 

3. Work-study: Employment which allows full-time students to earn a portion of the 
money needed to meet educational expenses. 

Application Procedures 

All students who wish to be considered for financial assistance must file a Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by May 1 of each award year. (Although the official deadline 
date is May 1, incoming freshmen are encouraged to submit the application as soon as 
possible after January 1 in order to expedite processing of financial aid notifications). No 
assurances can be made that funds will be available to students who apply after May 1 . 

The university uses the information collected on the FAFSA form to determine eligibility for 
university administered need-based programs, including University Mission Awards, 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Nursing and Perkins Loans, and Work-study. 
Out-of-state students should check with their high school guidance office or state agency to 
determine eligibility for grant assistance from their home state. 

Misericordia University no longer requires students to submit a institution specific application 
for financial aid to be considered for a University Mission Award (a university grant based 
upon financial need) Likewise, eligibility for academic scholarships are automatically evaluated 
by a scholarship committee with no special applications required. However, incoming 
freshmen must submit a McAuley Application in order to be considered for a McAuley Award 
(described later in this section). Outside of the FAFSA form, the McAuley Application is the 
only formal aid application required by the university for a student applying for grant 
assistance. 

Veterans: Misericordia University welcomes the opportunity to provide education to veterans of 
the armed services. The university is approved by the Veterans Administration for the 
education and training of veterans. 

Veterans enrolling at the institution for the first time should notify their local veterans 
administration office to apply for educational benefits. This application should be filed six 
weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. Students must contact the registrar's office to 
initiate the process. 

Definition of an Academic Year 

Financial aid is awarded for one academic year. Misericordia University defines its academic 
year as the period of at least 30 weeks of instructional time that begins on the first day of 
classes in the fall semester and ends on the last day of examinations in the spring semester. 
During this period, a full-time undergraduate student would be expected to complete a 
minimum of 24 credits. 

Renewal of Aid 

Academic scholarships are renewed annually provided the student maintains a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0. McAuley Awards are renewed annually provided the 
student demonstrates satisfactory academic progress. 

Need based financial aid is re-evaluated and renewed each year providing the student: 

• Submits a FAFSA form by May 1 

• Demonstrates financial need 

• Demonstrates satisfactory academic progress 



26 Financial Information 



24 


credits 


18 


credits 


12 


credits 


6 


credits 



Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy 

To receive or continue to receive federal, state, or university financial aid, all students must 
meet the following progress requirements: 

1 . Minimum grade point average required at the end of the academic 
year: 

First-year undergraduates 1 .75 

All other undergraduates 2.00 

Academic scholarship requirements are more stringent. Recipients of these awards must refer 
to the scholarship notification letter for grade point requirements. 

2. Successful completion of minimum number of credits per academic 
year: 

Full-time undergraduate 

Three-quarter-time undergraduate 

Half-time undergraduate 

Less than half-time undergraduate 
The minimum number of required credits is based on the assumption that the student is in 
attendance at the same enrollment status for the full academic year. If the student changes 
enrollment status, i.e. full-time fall, half-time spring, the required number of credits will differ. If 
you have questions, please contact the Student Financial Services Office at (570) 674-6222. 

3. Maximum time frame: 

An undergraduate student may receive aid under most programs for 12 semesters if full-time 
and 24 semesters if half-time. 

Any deficiencies in academic progress must be made up at the student's expense by 
successfully completing courses at Misericordia University or another accredited institution. 
Permission to take credits at another institution requires the permission of the registrar. Once 
the deficiency has been remedied, students must request that aid be reinstated for subsequent 
periods of enrollment. In the case of enrollment at another institution, the financial aid office 
will take into consideration the number of credits completed and the grades obtained. This 
financial aid policy differs from the institutional policy that accepts credits in transfer only, not 
grades obtained. 

For purposes of financial aid, satisfactory progress is defined using the following 
classifications: 

First year Those who have earned between 0-29.9 credits 

Sophomores Those who have earned between 30-59.9 credits 

Juniors Those who have earned between 60-89.9 credits 

Seniors Those who have earned between 90-1 19.9 credits 

Fifth year Those who have earned 120 credits or above 

Second degree Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree and are 

pursuing a second baccalaureate degree 

Full-time Students carrying a minimum of twelve credits in a regular 

semester format 

Part-time Students carrying less than twelve credits in a regular semester 

format. Students enrolled in accelerated or weekend classes may 



Financial Information 2 7 



carry twelve credits, but are still considered part-time 

Three-quarter-time Students carrying 9-1 1 .9 credits 

Half-time Students carrying 6-8.9 credits 

Less than half-time Students carrying .5-5.9 credits 

Non-matriculated Students who have not been formally accepted to a degree or 

certificate program 

Matriculated Students who have been formally accepted into a degree or 

certificate program 

Certificate Students following a sequence of courses leading to an 

educational certificate 

Right to Appeal 

If a student feels that satisfactory progress was impossible to attain because of mitigating 
circumstances, i.e. death in the family, extended iilness, etc., the student may request, in 
writing, a review of financial aid eligibility. This letter of appeal must be sent to the student 
financial services office and describe in detail the reason for failure to make satisfactory 
academic progress. 

Additional Requirements and Rights 

A student applying for aid must supply all required information as described above. The 
student's enrollment status is then verified, and the student financial services office will 
determine the student's financial aid in accordance with school policy. The student will then 
receive an award letter. 

Aid from outside sources must be reported to the student financial services office. Such 
outside aid may result in a change in eligibility status. 

Aid will vary according to enrollment status (full or part-time) and housing status (resident, off- 
campus, or commuter). Students must inform the student financial services office of any status 
changes after their aid is packaged. Students may request an appointment with the student 
financial services office to review the information that determines their aid for the year, and the 
amount of their financial aid package. 

Students have the right to request that their aid be re-evaluated if conditions arise which 
change their ability to meet the expenses of their education. 

Sources of financial aid are described below. More information may be obtained from the 
student financial services office at (570) 674-6222. 

Pell Grant 

This federal program provides grants that currently range from $445-$4,731 depending on 
financial need and educational costs. Students who have not yet completed their first 
undergraduate degree may apply. Application is made by completing the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid. 



28 Financial Information 



Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 

This federal program is available to undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need. 
Awards range from $200-$500 yearly depending on need, available funds, and other aid 
received by the student. Application is made by completing the Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid. 

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) Grant 

The PHEAA Grant is a Pennsylvania State Grant. All Pennsylvania residents are expected to 
apply for the PHEAA Grant. Application is made by completing the Free Application for 
Federal Student Aid. Eligibility and grant amounts are determined by the Pennsylvania Higher 
Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA). The deadline for application is usually May 1 prior to 
the start of the academic year for which aid is requested. 

Other State Grants 

Many states provide grants to their residents that may be used at colleges or universities in 
other states. These states include Ohio, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, West 
Virginia, Delaware, Washington D.C., and Vermont. Prospective students should contact their 
high school guidance office or their state higher education office to learn more about their 
state programs and obtain applications. 

Presidential Scholarships 

To demonstrate its commitment to academic excellence, the university awards financial 
assistance to incoming full-time first-year and transfer students who have attained outstanding 
academic records. All applicants are screened for scholarship eligibility upon formal admission 
to the university. Awards range from $1 ,000-$1 5,000 annually. Scholarships are renewable 
until graduation, provided minimum grade point averages are maintained. The minimum 
averages required for retention of the award are outlined in the scholarship notification letter. 

McAuley Awards 

The nature and type of activities in which a student participates in high school, including 
involvement in extra-curricular activities, are indicative of a student's potential success at 
Misericordia University. Full-time students who have served as volunteers in the community, 
demonstrated leadership, and have been active in extracurricular activities in high school may 
be eligible for a McAuley Award. These awards range from $1 ,000 to $5,000 and are 
renewable provided the student maintains satisfactory academic progress. 

Legacy Grant 

Children and grandchildren of Misericordia University's alumni are eligible for an annual 
$1,000 legacy grants: Stepchildren of Misericordia University's alumni are eligible provided 
they reside with the parent who is the alumnus and they are full-time students. The admissions 
office will screen applicants. Awards are renewable provided the student maintains 
satisfactory academic progress. 

Mission Awards 

Through its own fund raising effort, Misericordia University provides substantial financial 
assistance to needy students through mission awards. These awards help over 65 percent of 
Misericordia students meet their university costs. These awards are available to 
undergraduate full-time students with demonstrated financial need. Awards range from $600- 
$5,000 yearly depending on need, available funds and other aid received by the student. 
Students who receive the mission awards must maintain satisfactory academic progress and 
file the FAFSA form each year. 



Financial Informatic 



Non-Pennsylvania Resident Grants 

Out-of-state students who reside on campus are eligible for non-Pennsylvania resident grants. 
These $1,000 awards are renewable provided on-campus residency is maintained and 
satisfactory academic progress is maintained. 

Sibling Grants 

Full-time upperclassmen whose sibling is also enrolled full-time at Misericordia University are 
eligible for a $1,000 sibling grant. The award is renewable provided the student maintains 
sufficient academic progress, and both siblings are enrolled full-time. 

Federal Stafford Loan (Subsidized) 

This loan program allows financially eligible full- and half-time students to borrow money to 
help meet educational expenses. The borrowing limits are as follows: 

Year 1 0-29.9 credits earned $3,500 

Year 2 30-59.9 credits earned 4,500 

Year 3 60-89.9 credits earned 5,500 

Year 4 90-119.9 credits earned 5,500 

Year 5 120+ credits earned 5,500 

Graduate 8,500 

The interest rate, which is set annually by the federal government, varies but will not exceed 
8.25%. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or enrolls in 
fewer than six credits. Repayment may extend for up to 10 years. The exact amount of loan 
eligibility is determined by the following formula: educational costs minus financial aid, minus 
expected family contribution as calculated from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. 

Federal Stafford Loan (Unsubsidized) 

This loan program provides assistance to dependent students who do not qualify for a fully 
subsidized Stafford Loan, up to the loan limits described above. Credit worthy independent 
and graduate students, and dependent undergraduates who meet federal criteria may also be 
eligible to borrow the following amounts in addition to the borrowing limits specified for the 
subsidized Stafford Loan: 

Years 1 and 2 $4,000 

Years 3, 4, and 5 5,000 

Graduate 12,000 

Like the Stafford subsidized loan, repayment of principal may be deferred until after the 
student graduates, withdraws, or enrolls for fewer than six credits. However, interest must be 
paid on the loan while the student is enrolled, or capitalized upon repayment. 

Aggregate Maximum Loan Limits 

Dependent undergraduate students may borrow up to $23,000 in Stafford Loan funds. 
Independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $46,000 in both subsidized and 
unsubsidized loans. 

Federal PLUS Loan 

This program allows credit-worthy parents of full- or half-time dependent undergraduates to 
borrow up to the total of university costs minus other financial aid. The interest on the PLUS 
loan varies but will not exceed 9%. Although limited deferment provisions may be applicable to 
some borrowers, repayment normally begins within 60 days of disbursement with up to 10 
years to repay. 



30 Financial Information 



Perkins Loan 

This program provides low-interest loan assistance to students who demonstrate financial 
need. Students who properly complete the aid application process as previously described will 
be automatically evaluated for eligibility for Perkins Loan assistance. If eligible, the student will 
receive notification from the student financial services office. The current interest rate on a 
Perkins Loan is 5% with repayment deferred until nine months after the student graduates, 
withdraws, or drops below six credits. Additional provisions for deferment of repayment are 
available from the Student Financial Services Office. 

Nursing Loan 

This program makes low interest funds available to nursing majors who demonstrate financial 
need. The application and awarding process, as well as the interest rate and repayment terms 
are the same as for the Perkins Loan. 

Federal Work-study 

Funded by the federal government, this program provides part-time jobs for eligible students 
during the academic year and the summer. Jobs are available on campus and in the local 
community. Students must demonstrate financial need to be eligible. Whenever possible, 
students will be assigned jobs related to their educational interests. 

College Work-study 

The university maintains this work-study program through its own funding. It assists students 
who are not eligible to participate in the federal program, but who need to earn part of their 
university expenses through employment. 

Part-time Jobs 

Some part-time employment is available in the community for students. Students who are 
interested in part-time employment opportunities should inquire at the Insalaco Center for 
Career Development. 

Refunds of Overpayments 

Refunds of credit balances on student accounts caused by overpayment (either from financial 
aid or personal transaction) will be processed in the student financial services office within 10 
days from the date on which the credit balance occurs. The 10 days gives the university time 
to verify the amount of refund, to check on any other charges, and to confer with the financial 
aid director. 

Student refund requests must be approved by the director of student financial services 
Students are advised to begin the academic year with sufficient funds to pay for books and 
living expenses until refund checks are issued. 



Tuition Payment Options 

Payment Policy for Part-time Students 

At the time of registration, a part-time student must make arrangements for paying tuition and 
fees. The student may either pay for the course in full, have financial aid to cover the amount 
due, or participate in either the deferred payment plan or the tuition reimbursement payment 
plan. The details of the two payment plans are discussed below. 



Financial Information 3 1 



Tuition Reimbursement Payment Plan for Part-time Students 

Students who receive tuition benefits from their employer may be eligible to participate in 
Misericordia University's Tuition Reimbursement Payment Plan. Generally, this payment plan 
permits tuition and fees to be paid up to 30 days after the issuance of grades instead of at the 
time of registration for the course. The requirements of the plan are as follows: 

• Only part-time students are eligible. 

• A tuition reimbursement letter from the employer must be on file prior to registration 
and must be updated annually. The letter must state the terms of the benefit. 

• Students must keep the original invoice and final grades for employer verification. 
Duplicate invoices and grade sheets will not be issued. 

• It is the responsibility of the student, not the employer, to ensure that payment is made 
within the 30 day period. 

Students who fail to make payment within the 30 day grace period may be removed from the 
tuition reimbursement payment plan. 

• The 30 day grace period does not apply to graduating students. Tuition and fees must 
be paid prior to graduation. 

• Students who are receiving only partial tuition benefits must make arrangements to 
pay the costs that are not covered by the employer at the time of registration. 



Deferred Payment Plan for Part-time Students 

Misericordia University provides an option for students or parents to pay tuition, fees and other 
charges on a deferred payment plan. The plan permits educational costs to be spread over a 
period of time. The requirements of the plan are as follows: 

• Only part-time students are eligible. 

• A down payment of 20 percent of the total term/semester charges is required before 
the start of classes. 

• Deferments are limited to one term/semester; the unpaid balance must be paid before 
final examinations for that term/semester. Failure to pay charges in full before final 
exams may result in loss of credit for the term/semester. 

• At the close of each month, the unpaid balance will be charged a one percent finance 
charge. 

• Students who fail to meet their deferred payment obligations will be dropped from the 
plan. 

• Participants in the plan must sign and receive a copy of the deferred payment plan. 



Tuition Payment Plan for Full-time Students 

Full-time students may arrange to pay all or part of their college costs in monthly installments. 
A $50 annual fee is charged to cover the processing of payments. Students must be enrolled 
in the installment plan prior to the start of the academic year. The plan is managed by 
Academic Management Service, Inc., Swansea, Massachusetts. Contact the student financial 
service's office at (570) 674-6222 for additional information. 

Credit Card Payments 

Misericordia University accepts VISA, MasterCard, and Discover credit cards for payment of 
tuition and fees. 



32 Financial Information 



Finance Charge 

It is a university policy that any outstanding balances will be charged a one percent finance 
charge at the close of the second month of the semester and each month thereafter. Finance 
charges are waived for the following students: 

• Students enrolled in the Sallie Mae TuitionPay Program (see Tuition Payment Plan for 
Full-Time Students). 

• Students who receive rehabilitation benefits or veterans' education benefits 

• Part-time students who participate in the tuition reimbursement payment plan. 

Refund Policies 

Full-time Traditional Day 

When a full-time traditional student enrolled in day classes for the full 15-week semester 
withdraws from the university, she or he must file an official notice of withdrawal with the vice 
president of student affairs. 

Full-time Non-traditional Day 

When a full-time non-traditional student enrolled in day classes for the full 15-week semester 
withdraws from the university, she or he must file an official notice of withdrawal with the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

Part-time Day and Once-per-week 

If a part-time student enrolled in traditional day (15-week semester) or once-per-week evening 
classes (15-week semester) withdraws from the university, he or she must file an official notice 
of withdrawal with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

The percentage of charges for full-time traditional day students, full-time non-traditional day 
students, part-time day, and once-per week evening students is determined by the date that 
the vice president of student affairs or the Dean of the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education receives an official notice of withdrawal. 

Tuition, fees, room, and board charges will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 



Time of Withdrawal 


Amount 


First Week 


100% 


Second Week 


90% 


Third Week 


80% 


Fourth Week 


70% 


Fifth Week 


60% 


Sixth Week 


60% 


Seventh Week 


50% 


Eighth Week 


40% 


Ninth Week 


40% 



No refunds of charges are allowed after the ninth week. There are no refunds on room 
deposits. 

The student financial services office is required by federal statute to recalculate federal 
financial aid eligibility for students who withdraw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of 



Financial Information 



absence prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term. The Federal Title IV financial 
aid programs must be recalculated in these situations. 

If a student leaves the institution prior to completing 60% of a payment period or term, the 
student financial services office recalculates eligibility for Title IV funds. Recalculation is based 
on the percentage of earned aid using the following federal return of Title IV funds formula: 
Percentage of payment period or term completed=the number of days completed up to the 
withdrawal date divided by the total days in the payment period or term, (any break of five 
days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This percentage is also the 
percentage of earned aid. 

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of unearned 
aid using the following formula: Aid to be returned = (1 00% of the aid that could be disbursed 
minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have been 
disbursed during the payment period or term. 

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution would be required to return a 
portion of the funds and the student would be required to return a portion of the funds. When 
Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower may owe a debit balance to the university. 

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him/her, the university would owe the 
student a post-withdrawal disbursement which must be paid within 120 days of the student's 
withdrawal. 

The university must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible no later than 
30 days after the date of the determination of the date of the student's withdrawal. 

Refunds are allocated in the following order: 

• Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans (other than PLUS loans) 

• Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans 

• Federal Perkins Loans 

• Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans 

• Direct PLUS Loans 

• Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required 

• Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants for which a return of funds is required 

• Other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required (e.g., LEAP) 

There will be no adjustment to federal or institutional aid after the completion of at least 60 
percent of the semester. The calculation of Title IV refunds will be computed by the Student 
Financial Services Office. 

Students who receive a refund of financial aid prior to withdrawing may owe a repayment of 
federal financial aid received. Students who fail to return federal funds as required will be 
ineligible for aid until repayment is made. 



34 Financial Information 



Change of Academic Status 

If a student drops from full to part-time during the first two weeks of classes, adjustment to 
tuition charges will be made as follows: 

1. The full-time tuition charges originally assessed will be reduced according to 
the official drop/add date defined by the Vice President of Academic Affairs 
Office, and by applying a percentage adjustment based on the following: 

First Week 100% tuition 

Second Week 75% tuition 

No adjustment will be made to tuition charges or financial aid after the second week. 

2. Part-time tuition charges will then be computed by multiplying the actual 
number of credits being taken after the drop, by the appropriate credit charge. 

Part-time Accelerated Evening 

When a part-time accelerated student drops a course or withdraws from the university, official 
notice must be filed with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

Tuition and other charges will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 

Prior to the second week 1 00% 

Prior to the third week 70% 

Prior to the fourth week 60% 

During the fourth week 40% 

No refund will be given after the fourth week. 

Weekend College 

When a weekend college student drops a course or withdraws from the university, official 
notice must be filed with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. Tuition and other 
charges will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 

Prior to the second weekend 1 00% 
Prior to the third weekend 70% 

Prior to the fourth weekend 50% 

On the fourth weekend 40% 

No refund will be given after the fourth weekend. 

Expressway Program 

When an Expressway student drops a course or withdraws from the university, official notice 
must be filed with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. Tuition and other charges 
will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 

Five week classes 

Prior to the second class 1 00% 

Prior to the third class 70% 

No refund will be given after the third class. 

Seven week classes 

Prior to the second week 1 00% 

Prior to the third week 70% 

Prior to the fourth week 60% 

During the fourth week 40% 
No refund after the fourth week. 



Financial Information 35 



Summer Session I through IV 

Students enrolled in summer session I and III who drop courses or withdraw from the 
university must file official notice with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. Tuition 
and other charges will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 

During the first week 1 00% 

During the second week 70% 

During the third week 50% 

No refund after the fourth week. Financial aid will be adjusted according to the same policy 
used for full-time students. 

Students enrolled in summer session II and IV who drop courses or withdraw from the 
university must file official notice with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. Tuition 
and other charges will be cancelled at the following percentage rates: 

Prior to second class 1 00% 

Prior to fourth class 70% 

Prior to sixth class 50% 

Prior to seventh class 40% 

No refund after the seventh class. Financial aid will be adjusted according to the same policy 
used for full-time students. 

Administrative Regulation and Payment of Tuition and Fees 

Misericordia University students are expected to pay their bills in a timely manner. The student 
financial services office personnel assist students in meeting their financial obligations and will 
discuss reasonable payment schedules in extraordinary cases. In order to assure the 
collection of money due the university, students with unpaid balances for tuition, fees, 
bookstore charges, library fines, parking fines, or any other Misericordia University approved 
fee or fine will be denied the following privileges or services: 

1. Class registration. 

2. Participation in graduation ceremonies and the awarding of diplomas. Also, seniors 
may be denied final exams. 

3. Transcript issue. 

4. Residence hall reservation privileges. 

Endowed Scholarships 

Individuals and businesses close to Misericordia University sponsor scholarships which are 
available to qualified students each year. 

Eligibility criteria and award information are available in the student financial aid services 
office. 

Academic Endowment 

Louis and Barbara T. Alesi Scholarship 

Geraldine Ruth Daley Anderson Scholarship 

Robert S. Anderson M.D., Pre-Medical Scholarship 

Art Gallery Endowment 

Dr. Thomas Baker Scholarship 



36 Financial Information 



Francis H. Wilcheck Beisel Scholarship 

Monsignor John Bendik Scholarship 

Benedetti Family Scholarship 

Brassington Family Scholarship Fund 

Carol Flanagan Zoeller Brown Scholarship 

Marita Delaney Burke '35 Scholarship 

Bishop J. Carroll McCormick Scholarship 

Victoria Cadwalader Nursing Scholarship 

Bridget Carney Scholarship 

Robert J. Clark Scholarship 

The Anthony and Elizabeth Colonna and Family Scholarship 

James J. Connery Scholarship 

Rose and George Cook, Sr. Scholarship 

Dr. Joseph and Mrs. Marion Cooper Endowed Scholarship 

Rose Marie Miano Coughlin '60 Scholarship 

Cronin Family Scholarship 

Dallas Junior Women's Club Scholarship 

Theresa Decker Scholarship 

Joseph Robert and Ann Marie Conforti Doggett Scholarship 

John L. Dorris, M.D. FACS Scholarship 

Sharon Drasnin Scholarship 

DuPont Academic Chemistry Scholarship 

Dupont Academic Biochemistry Scholarship at Misericordia University 

Edith Elliot Scholarship 

Leslie Fay Scholarship 

Fine Arts Scholarship 

Jean Chorazy Fink Scholarship 

Charles D. Flack, Sr. Scholarship 

Catherine and Daniel J. Flood Endowment for Humanities Scholarship 

Helen Barbara Fogel Scholarship 

Fortinsky Scholarship 

Sidney and Pauline Friedman Scholarship 

Mary Elizabeth "Mollie" Gallagher Scholarship 

Sr. Wilfred Gallagher, RSM Memorial Scholarship 

Darlene Bender Garland '91 Memorial OT Scholarship 

Gates/Milnamow Scholarship 

Maria Grilli Gatta '68 Memorial Scholarship 

Anna and Frank Gerold Scholarship 

Frederick and Sarah Joyce Gerrity Endowed Scholarship 

Catherine "Kitty" Rooney Gould '50 Memorial Award 

Henry and Sylvia Greenwald Scholarship 



Financial Informatic 



William Randolph Hearst Scholarship 

Heather Huntzinger Memorial Scholarship 

The Rosenn Scholarship Honoring Father William B. Hill and Sister M. William Joseph 
Lydon 

InterMetro Scholarship 

Walter and Catherine Janasie Scholarship 

Mrs. John F. Kenny Scholarship 

Marie Wittman Kilgallon '41 Scholarship 

Genevieve Mullin Kimbro Scholarship 

Helen McCarthy Kirk Scholarship 

The Mary McDermott Klatt '54 Memorial Scholarship 

The Joan Krause '58 Student Emergency Fund 

Stanley T. Lysiak Scholarship 

Dr. Louis Maganzin Scholarship 

Joan W. Martin Women with Children Scholarship 

Maslow Family Foundation Scholarship for Women with Children 

John A. McCole Scholarship 

Claire Rinkin McDonnell '49 Scholarship 

Sister Celestine McHale Scholarship 

Elizabeth Grady McNamara '41 Scholarship 

Mercy Health System — Northeast Region Scholarship 

Misericordia University Alumni Board Scholarship 

Marian F. Jones Mitchell '44 Scholarship 

Marguerite K. Moran and Margaret C. Morrissey Scholarship 

Margaret C. Morrissey Scholarship 

Sister Theresa Mary Moyles Scholarship 

John Mullany Scholarship 

Dean and Mary Elizabeth Noll '47 Scholarship 

Jean Olash Murphy '50 Scholarship 

Charlotte Newcombe Scholarship 

Helen McAndrew O'Connor Scholarship 

Sr. Miriam Theresa O'Donnell and Family Scholarship 

Madlyn Sholtis Parrish Scholarship 

The Margaret C. Paye '49 Scholarship 

Penn State Geisinger Scholarship Honoring Dr. David W. Kistler, MD 

Perrella Family Scholarship 

Reverend John Petrasko Scholarship 

John and Sharon Randolph Scholarship 

Bertie Fowler Rasmussen Scholarship 

Sisters of Mercy of Dallas Scholarship 



38 Financial Information 



Nelson F. Rodda and Rose M. Rodda Scholarship 

Rosenn Family Scholarship 

Rosemary A. Sigmond Scholarship 

Theresa Husic Silliman '54 Alumni Scholarship 

Karen Smulowitz Scholarship 

Grace Jones Spain Scholarship 

Margaret Husic Spengler '36 Scholarship 

James M. Stack Family Scholarship 

Catherine Stefanchik Scholarship 

Dr. Joseph Tomasovic Scholarsnip 

Leona M. Ulichney Scholarship 

Elizabeth Richards Umphred Scholarship 

Anne Louise Wittman '56 Scholarship 

Annual Scholarships 

Georgia Slocum Cornell Scholarship 
Coughlin Family Scholarship 
DuPont Academic Chemistry Scholarship 
DuPont Academic Biochemistry Scholarship 
Mary Louise Faber Annual Scholarship 
Jean Tyrell Weinberg '52 Nursing Scholarship 

Academics 



A Misericord ia University Education 

The Trinity of Learning 

An education at Misericordia University combines quality academics, professional preparation, 
and service leadership — our Trinity of Learning. The Trinity of Learning prepares students for 
a lifetime of learning and achievement. 

Student Satisfaction 

According to recent national surveys, 97% of our first-year students said they were satisfied or 
very satisfied with their university experience, compared to about 87% of students in other 
schools in the survey.* They cited greater contact with faculty; orientation, advisement, and 
academic assistance; financial aid services; computer, classroom, library, health and 
recreational facilities; and housing as major reasons why they felt comfortable and supported. 

Part-time students and others enrolled in our adult learning programs ranked us at the top for 
student satisfaction, citing access to advisement, instructor effectiveness, and overall 
customer service. § 



Academics 



Undergraduate Educational Goals 

In fulfillment of its mission, Misehcordia University provides a learning community which 
prepares its baccalaureate graduates to: 

1 . Reflect the values of mercy, justice, and hospitality in their actions. 

2. Contribute to their communities through service and leadership. 

3. Consider ethical issues and values and make reasoned judgments about them. 

4. Think independently and creatively, analyze information critically, and solve problems. 

5. Respect and understand cultural differences. 

6. Understand global perspectives. 

7. Communicate and interact effectively. 

8. Understand and appreciate the arts, humanities, science, and technology. 

9. Succeed in their academic disciplines. 

10. Pursue life-long learning. 

* Noel-Levitz Center, 2005 

§ National Survey of Student Engagement, 2007 Indiana University. 

Academic Policies and Procedures 

A ca demic Advising 

Students are assigned an academic advisor, ordinarily within the department in which a 
student is majoring. Advisors will also be assigned to students who are undecided about a 
major. The academic advisor is the student's liaison with other university offices. Advisors 
should be consulted often for guidance and advice. In addition to offering academic guidance, 
advisors can provide information on where to obtain and how to complete necessary forms 
pertaining to academics. Advisors must approve student schedules and all other academic 
paperwork. Students meet with advisors individually for pre-registration consultation each 
semester. 

Academic Honors 

The dean's list, which is issued at the close of each semester, recognizes students who have 
completed a minimum of 12 graded credit hours and have earned a grade point average of 
3.55 (on a 4.0 system) for the semester. Part-time students are eligible for the dean's list after 
they have completed 12 credits at Misericordia University, and earn six or more undergraduate 
credits in a given semester. The dean's list is an award earned at the end of each semester. 

Undergraduate students are awarded baccalaureate degrees with distinction for exceptional 
academic achievement. Honors are awarded as follows: 

Distinction Grade Point Average at Graduation 

Summa Cum Laude 3.90 and above 

Magna Cum Laude 3.70 - 3.89 

Cum Laude 3.50 - 3.69 

A student must have completed at least 60 credits at Misericordia University to qualify for 
these honors. The class valedictorian is determined by the full-time matriculated student with 
the highest cumulative undergraduate average who has completed all course work at 
Misericordia University with the exception of the 12 credits allowed through off-campus 
requests or any advanced placement credits. 



40 Academics 



Students who complete the Misericordia University Honors Program while achieving a GPA of 
3.25 or higher will be awarded an honors designation (see program requirements, page 52 for 
a description). 

Academic Integrity 

Any form of cheating or dishonesty, including plagiarism, is a fundamental violation of the 
nature and purpose of Misericordia University. Such behavior will not be tolerated and will 
result in at least lowered grades, possibly failure in a class, program dismissal, and, in the 
most serious cases, dismissal from the university. 

Plagiarism is using someone else's ideas or words and claiming them as one's own. Students 
who use another person's words must copy them accurately, enclose them in quotations 
marks, and identify the source clearly. If another person's ideas are used in a student paper, 
the source must still be identified and the author of the ideas given credit. Students are 
responsible to make sure they are using sources properly and documenting them properly. 

The responsibility for maintaining personal integrity and honor in academic activities rests with 
the student. Each faculty member will provide information on academic integrity to students in 
the course outline at the beginning of the semester, including any necessary explanation of 
violations, possible infractions of academic integrity and the scope of sanctions, e.g., warning, 
lowering of the grade on the assignment or course, course failure, or dismissal from the 
program or university. 

Should a violation of academic integrity occur, the faculty member must inform the student of 
the violation before imposing any sanction. Should the violation be considered serious enough 
to merit any grade of "D" or lower on any major assignment, or a more serious penalty, such 
as course failure or dismissal from the program, the faculty member must notify the vice 
president of academic affairs (VPAA) and supply any supporting evidence. In the case of 
multiple violations, the VPAA will discuss this issue with the student and may impose 
additional sanctions up to and including dismissal from the university. In a case where 
dismissal from the university is contemplated, the VPAA will consult with the faculty member, 
student's advisor, department chair/program director, and college dean. 

In cases where the student contests the accusations of academic dishonesty, the student may 
file a grievance under either the undergraduate or graduate grievance procedure, whichever 
one is applicable. 

Academic Restart Policy 

Undergraduate students who have been academically dismissed or have been withdrawn for 
at least two academic years from Misericordia University may apply for readmission to the 
university one time under the academic restart policy. Readmission to Misericordia University 
under this policy will be granted at the sole discretion of the vice president of academic affairs. 
In order to qualify, a student must not have attended Misericordia University for 24 months 
following the dismissal or withdrawal date, or must have completed at least 12 credits 
approved in advance by the Misericordia University Registrar earning a "C" or better in each 
course. He/she will be academically advised by the registrar for at least the first semester of 
his/her return. 

Students admitted under the academic restart policy will have their cumulative index reset to 
0.00 at the time of their readmission. Courses taken and grades earned before the restart will 
remain on the student's transcript (permanent record), but they will be treated as the 
equivalent of transfer credits. Any required courses which were taken at Misericordia 
University earning a grade below a "C-" will not be awarded credit and will need to be retaken. 
Students admitted under this policy are not automatically readmitted to any given program. 



Academics 4 1 



Academic Standing 

All students must maintain an acceptable cumulative grade point average to remain in good 
academic standing. Failure to do so will result in either academic probation or dismissal. Some 
majors have academic performance criteria which are program specific. 

Cancellation of Classes 

Students may call (570) 674-631 1 or log onto e-MU for information regarding the closing of the 
university. If the university is to be closed, open for part of a day, or placed on compressed 
schedule because of weather or other unforeseen events, the decision will be made as soon 
as possible and posted on the portal and relayed promptly to local radio and television 
stations. Individual class cancellations are posted on e-MU by the vice president of academic 
affairs office as they are reported. 

Change of Academic Major 

Students who wish to change from one major program to another will consult with their 
assigned academic advisor. The student must secure approval for the change from the 
department chair of the major program into which the student wishes to transfer. Forms which 
must be completed in order to change one's major may be obtained in either the registrar's 
office, on e-MU, or in the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. The change of major 
does not take place until the appropriate form is properly executed and filed with the registrar. 

Change of Name/Address 

Students are responsible for notifying the registrar's office in writing of any change in name 

and/or address. This change will be appropriately processed throughout the university. 

Change in Resident Status 

Each residential student must sign the campus housing agreement. This agreement is binding 
for the entire fall and spring semesters and states that the student will remain in residence for 
the duration of this agreement. Any release from this agreement is permitted only under the 
conditions of academic withdrawal, dismissal, verified medical reasons or other extreme 
extenuating circumstances, and only with the written approval of the director of residence life. 
Any request for release must be submitted in writing to the director of residence life and will be 
evaluated on a case-by-case basis. A student wishing to leave campus housing and move 
home (with their immediate family) must petition, in writing, for a release from their campus 
housing agreement for the spring semester by December 1 , to the office of residence life. 
Percentage of refund of room and board fees will be determined by the actual date of 
departure established by officially checking out and returning all keys to the residence life 
office. 

Change of Status 

Students who wish to change from full-time to part-time status are required to consult with 
their academic advisor and submit the appropriate form with all requisite signatures to the vice 
president of academic affairs office for processing. Students considering such a change 
should also consult with the office of student financial services for information about the 
implications of the decision on financial aid eligibility. Students will then be referred to the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education for registration information. 

Students who want to change from part-time to full-time status must address a letter to the 
director of admissions stating their intention. 



42 Academics 



Class Attendance 

It is the responsibility of the student to be aware of the attendance policy of each faculty 
member in whose classes they are enrolled. It is the responsibility of the student to consult 
with the appropriate faculty member prior to a necessary absence to determine and confirm 
arrangements for make-up work. 

If a student is unable to attend class, she/he is to contact the faculty member directly in 
accordance with the class syllabus, if applicable. Should a situation arise where a student will 
be missing classes for an extended period of time, the student is to contact the student affairs 
office secretary (674-6238) who will then notify the vice president of academic affairs office. 
The office of academic affairs will notify the student's course instructors of the absence. It is 
the student's responsibility to contact his/her instructors for information on fulfilling course 
requirements. 

Course Repeat/Grade Replacement Policy 

Students can only receive credit for a course once. Students are eligible for a maximum of five 
grade replacements. However, the same course can be repeated only one time for the 
purpose of grade replacement. The student must indicate his/her intention of replacing the old 
grade with the new one by filing the appropriate form with the registrar at registration. All 
grade replacement courses must be taken at Misericordia University. The repeated course will 
appear on the transcript twice. The original grade will be replaced with an "R." Only the new 
grade, even if it is lower than the original, will be used in calculating the student's grade point 
average (GPA). A directed study may not be used as a grade replacement without the 
permission of the chair of the department offering the course and the approval of the college 
dean. 

If a student has grade replaced a course and receives a second unacceptable grade, and is 
required to pass the course to achieve the degree, he/she may request the opportunity to take 
the course a third time. This must be approved by the department chair of the program offering 
the course. The second unacceptable grade will remain on the student's transcript and be 
calculated into the student's GPA. 

Once a student has graduated, the student's record prior to graduation is not subject to 
change through this policy. 

Contract Learning 

Two types of contract learning are available at Misericordia University: (1) directed study and 
(2) independent study. Student must be formally admitted to the university to register for 
contract learning. A student can earn no more than 15 credits via the contract learning option. 
A maximum of six contract learning credits may be carried in a semester. Contract learning 
(either independent study or directed study) will be delivered to the student at no additional 
cost above the regular tuition fees. 

Credit Load Full-time 

A Misericordia University Baccalaureate Degree requires a minimum of 120 credits. A 
maximum semester load is 17 credits. Students who wish to take 18 credits in one semester 
must have a minimum GPA of 2.75, or the approval of their academic advisor. Students who 
wish to take 19 or more credits must also receive written permission from their college dean 
prior to registration. Students will pay an additional per credit charge for every credit taken 
over 17 (see tuition and fees). No student may take more than 21 credits in one semester. 



Academics - 



Credit Load Part-time 

Ordinarily, students who are classified as part-time may take no more than 12 credits in any 
combination of traditional, accelerated, or weekend formats in any one semester period while 
being charged the per credit tuition rate. 

Directed Study 

When a student must take a specific university course in a given semester but it is not part of 
the offerings in that semester, the student may petition for a directed study. Students may 
apply for directed study only in exceptional situations. Students may not use a directed study 
to repeat a course. Students who wish to apply for a directed study must have at least a 2.5 
GPA. 

A student interested in this option must first discuss this possibility with his/her advisor, and 
then approach the appropriate department chairperson and college dean sponsoring the 
course under consideration. If the contract is approved at that level, the student will approach 
the appropriate faculty member to determine his/her availability. Faculty retain the right to 
decline a request for a directed study. Final approval of this arrangement is made by the Vice 
President of Academic Affairs. A written contract is required between the instructor and the 
student. The minimum number of times that a student and instructor are to meet will be 
included in this contract. Copies of the contract are to be forwarded to the Vice President of 
Academic Affairs, the student's advisor, the instructor, and the registrar. The student must 
register prior to the beginning of a semester for a contract learning directed study. Ideally the 
contract should be completed during the previous semester. Students will be expected to 
assume the majority of responsibility for actually writing the contract. Forms are available in 
the offices of the registrar, Center for Adult and Continuing Education, and online. 

Drop/Add 

Students should consult the academic or adult education calendars for the dates of the 
drop/add period, during which time schedule changes may be made with the Registrar. 
Drop/add forms are available in the registrar's office, the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education, and online. The drop/add form must be signed by the student's advisor before it 
may be processed. Drop/add is not official unless the form is received and processed by the 
registrar or the Center for Adult and Continuing Education during the drop/add period. 

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment) 

Misericordia University adheres to the rights accorded to students with regard to their 
educational records as set forth in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 
1974 and as subsequently amended. Educational records are all records that contain 
information that is directly related to a student and are maintained by an educational agency or 
institution or by a party acting for the agency or institution. This federal legislation protects the 
confidentiality of students' educational records. It also affirms the student's right to inspect the 
contents of his/her educational records, to seek to have the records amended, and to have 
some control over the disclosure of information from the records. Educational records are 
maintained in the offices of the registrar, student financial services, financial aid, academic 
departments and/or advisors. 

Misericordia University reserves the right to release "directory information" as defined by 
FERPA. The university releases the following directory information: name, class, hometown 
and state, major field of study, participation in officially-recognized sports, degrees, awards 
and honors achieved in the curricular and co-curricular life of the university, the most recent 



44 Academics 



previous educational institution attended by the student, and individually identifiable 
photographs of the student solicited by or maintained directly by Misencordia University as 
part of the educational record. 

A full copy of the university policy with regards to FERPA and forms for consent to release and 
request to withhold release of directory information are available in the registrar's office 
Students have an opportunity to complete these forms during the check-in process every fall 
and may request in writing to release or withhold specific information annually. This policy is 
subject always to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 and 
as subsequently amended. 

Grading System 

The grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing honor points earned by credits 

attempted. Any courses failed will be charged as credits attempted through the final 

calculation of a student's grade point average. A minimum of a 2.0 cumulative grade point 

average both overall and in the core curriculum is required to graduate with a baccalaureate 

degree. 

Some majors require a higher cumulative grade point average for graduation and program 
retention. Students should consult individual academic program descriptions for major 
requirements. 



Grades 






Honor Points Per Credit Hour 


A 






4.0 


A- 






3.7 


B+ 






3.3 


B 






3.0 


B- 






2.7 


C+ 






2.3 


C 






2.0 


C- 






1.7 


D 






1.0 


F 






0.0 


I 


Incomplete 




0.0 


AU 


Audit 




Not calculated 


W 


Withdrawn 




Not calculated 


IP 


In progress 




Not calculated 


S 


Satisfactory: pass 


Not calculated 


U 


Unsatisfactory: 


fail 


Not calculated 



Please note the following implications of this grading system: 

1 . A grade of "W" is given to students who withdraw prior to the end of the withdraw 
period. As noted in the university calendar, no academic penalty is incurred. 
Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the registrar's office or online. The date on 
which the form is received by the registrar's office is considered as the date of 
withdrawal. The tuition refund and grade assignment are based on this date (see 
refund policy). 

2. If a student does not officially withdraw from a course and ceases to attend it, a grade 
of "F" is incurred, except in extenuating circumstances. 

3. It is the responsibility of the undergraduate student to contract with the instructor in 
writing to apply for a grade of incomplete "I." An T must be removed within six weeks 



Academics 



after the end of the semester or an earlier date determined by the faculty member and 
agreed upon by the student or the incomplete becomes a grade of "F." 

4. Incomplete Grades for Graduate Program 

The grade of "I" will be issued only for those courses in which a student has not 

completed the necessary requirements for graduate courses (500 and 600 level 

courses) because of extenuating circumstances. 

Should conditions arise that prohibit the student from completing required course 

assignments by specified due dates, the student must negotiate with the course 

professor for a grade of incomplete ("I"). The student must contact the course 

professor and file an incomplete contract grade form with the professor at least two 

weeks prior to the date semester grades are due to the registrar. The form is signed 

by the student and the faculty member and a copy is retained by the student. The 

course professor has the right to determine the length of time for completion of the 

course requirements within the maximum time limits allowed. The grade of "I" must 

be removed within a maximum of one semester or the "I" automatically becomes an 

"F." 

Emergencies may arise which do not allow a two-week notice. In that event, the 

student must petition the Vice President of Academic Affairs who will, in turn, inform 

the course faculty involved. 

A grade of "IP" (In Progress) will only be issued for profession contribution courses. 

The "IP" must be removed within a maximum of one calendar year or the "IP" 

automatically becomes an "F." 

Note: A student who will be negotiating a grade of "I" or "IP" must obtain an 

incomplete contract grade form from the registrar's office or online. 

5. Pass/Fail grading is limited to those courses designated in the university catalog to be 
on a S/U basis. The letter grade of S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory) will be 
assigned to these courses. S and U grades are listed on the transcript but are not 
calculated in the grade point average. Credits for these courses are not included in the 
12 graded credit hours required for the dean's list. 

Graduation Requirements 

The minimum number of credits required of a baccalaureate degree from Misericordia 
University is 120 credits. To obtain a baccalaureate degree a student must complete the 
minimum hours of credit required by the declared major program even if that number exceeds 
120 credits. A transfer student must complete a minimum of 30 credits at Misericordia 
University for any given degree. That number may exceed 30 credits contingent on the number 
of total credits a student needs to meet degree requirements. Students should consult 
individual program descriptions. 

A degree application form, available from the registrar's office, must be completed in the year 
of graduation by the student and advisor. This form is to be submitted to the registrar's office 
during the fall semester prior to spring graduation. All bills must be paid in advance for a 
student to be eligible to graduate. Failure to do so in a timely manner many delay the date of 
receiving a diploma. 

Only students completing all academic requirements in May or August will be permitted to 
process in the May ceremony of that same year. Example: Students completing all 
requirements in May or August 2007 will be eligible to walk in the May 2007 ceremony. 
Students completing all requirements by December of 2007 will be eligible to participate in the 
May 2008 ceremony. 



46 Academics 



Independent Study 

Independent study is the special investigation of a selected topic. It may be undertaken by a 

junior or senior student whose academic requirements cannot be met by regular catalog 

offerings. Only elective credits may be used for independent study. Depending on the depth 

and scope of an independent study, anywhere from one to six credits may be earned 

(determination of assigned credits is made by the appropriate department chair and faculty 

member). 

Students who wish to apply for an independent study must have at least a 3.0 GPA. The 
student must have demonstrated the ability to pursue independent work. To apply for 
independent study, students must (a) define the topic or issue to be pursued; (b) discuss their 
plan with their advisor; (c) contact the chairperson of the appropriate department/program to 
request approval of their proposal; (d) if the independent study is approved, the student will 
approach a faculty member in the department that sponsors the independent study to serve as 
a mentor. Faculty are free to choose whether or not to mentor a student for independent study. 

Part of the intent of an independent study is to foster self-directed learning. Therefore, after a 
student has specified the content area to be studied and has diagnosed his/her learning 
needs, the faculty member and student will jointly negotiate course objectives; learning 
resources and methodology; and procedures for evaluation. The minimum number of meeting 
times will also be specified. A written contract, which includes these areas, is to be drafted and 
signed by the faculty member and student. Copies are to be forwarded to the vice president of 
academic affairs, the student's advisor, the mentor, and the registrar. 

Independent work is not governed by the academic calendar. A project may be started and 
ended at any point during the semester. Students should register for an independent study 
when their work is initiated; if the project extends beyond the end of a given semester, an in 
progress (IP) can be issued. 

Independent study application forms may be obtained from the offices of the registrar, the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education, and online. 

Intellectual Property 

Misericordia University supports the development, production, and dissemination of intellectual 
property by members of its community. For those members of the community interested in 
creating intellectual property as part of their work or learning experience, please be advised 
that the University's Intellectual Property Agreement can be found at: 

http://www.misericordia.edu/misericordia_pg_sub.cfm?sub_page_id=1107&subcat_id=114&pagejd=389 

Off-campus Courses 

Off-campus courses are defined as those not sponsored by Misericordia University or by our 
consortium partners, King's College and Wilkes University (see Consortium Programs, page 
53). Students may complete a maximum of 12 credits in approved off-campus courses, of 
which no more than six credits may be in core courses. 

Once matriculated at the university, transfer students may not transfer more than six additional 
credits in approved off-campus courses, of which no more than three credits may be in the 
core. A student who has completed 60 credits of academic work, whether on campus or in 
transfer, must take all additional transfer credits at an accredited four-year institution. 

All off-campus courses must be evaluated and approved as to their equivalency to 
Misericordia University courses. This determination will be made in consultation between the 
department chair in the discipline which sponsors the course at Misericordia University and the 
registrar. 

Off-campus course approval forms are available in the registrar's office or online. 



Academics 4 



Probation/Dismissal 

The academic status committee meets each semester promptly after grades are run to 
deliberate the standing of students relative to the probation/dismissal policy. Academic 
probation is the automatic and minimum penalty for failing to maintain an acceptable 
cumulative grade point average. Students failing to maintain an acceptable grade point 
average are also subject to dismissal from the university. 

Acceptable Cumulative Grade Point Average: 

12 to 23 credits 1.75 

24 to 37 credits 1.90 

38 credits and above 2.0 

Transfer students 2.0 

Students will also be placed on academic probation for failure to maintain an acceptable 
cumulative grade point average in courses taken to fulfill the core curriculum requirements. 
Students who have attempted 30 credits or above will be placed on academic probation if their 
cumulative grade point average for core requirements is below 2.0. 

Students on academic probation are required to carry a restricted academic load. A student on 
academic probation is prohibited from representing the university in any official capacity. This 
prohibition includes, but is not limited to, holding an elected or appointed office or seat in 
student government, or on the executive board of student government, serving as a resident 
advisor, or participating in intercollegiate athletics. Furthermore, students may have their 
participation in non-prohibited extracurricular activities curtailed if in the judgment of the 
academic status committee such activities interfere with their academic performance. 

Academic probation will begin with the first class meeting of the semester (Fall, Spring or 
Summer) following the decision to place a student on academic probation. Students who are 
placed on probation will normally have one semester to raise their cumulative grade point 
average to 2.0. Failure to make satisfactory academic progress will result in academic 
dismissal. Students who have been removed from academic probation must maintain a 2.0 
(GPA) status throughout the remainder of their academic program. A student who is 
academically dismissed will not be permitted to attend classes on a non-matriculating basis. 

Registration 

All registration will be done online by current class status. Students must make an 
appointment with their advisor to approve course selection prior to registration. Students 
should check their status on the portal and resolve any conflict with the registrar's office prior 
to registration. 

Second Degree 

Students who wish to obtain a second baccalaureate degree may do so if they meet the 

following conditions: 

1 . The student must be officially admitted into the major program in which the second 
degree is desired. 

2. The student must meet all of the curriculum requirements of the second degree. 

3. The student must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours in addition to the credits 
taken in the first degree program. 

4. For the purposes of a second degree, the core curriculum is waived with the exception 
of those courses required for the major. 



48 Academics 






Second Major 

Graduates of Misericordia University who wish to return for a second major may do so by 
completing only the requirements necessary for the second major. The Registrar will post a 
statement on the official transcript stating "requirements completed for a second major in 
Student cannot declare second majors in Interdisciplinary Studies or Professional Studies See 
individual department policies regarding standards for second majors. 

Students with Special Needs 

The university, through the dean of students and the Alternative Learners Project (ALP), 

coordinates its efforts to integrate students with disabilities into all areas of campus life. All 

academic support services/accommodations needed for classroom/clinical/field experiences 

are coordinated through the Alternative Learners Project and the dean of students. Services 

from the ALP are provided based on receipt and acceptance of specific documentation 

requirements. 

The dean of students, whose office is located in the Banks Student Life Center, coordinates all 
non-academic services. Should a student with a disability feel that he/she is a victim of 
discrimination based on ability, he/she can file a grievance through the dean of students office. 

Misericordia University does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission to its 
programs, services, in access to them, in treatment of individuals with disabilities or in any 
aspect of their operations. The university also does not discriminate on the basis of disability 
in its hiring or employment practices. 

This notice is provided as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and Section 
504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Questions, complaints or requests for additional 
information regarding the ADA and Section 504 may be forwarded to the Dean of Students 
who is the designated ADA and Section 504 compliance coordinator. 

This notice is available from the ADA and Section 504 compliance coordinator in large print, 
on audio tape and in Braille. 

Undergraduate Academic Grievance 

The university provides a uniform method by which students can pursue grievable issues. 
Grievable issues are either complaints about alleged violations of the institution's academic 
policies or about unfairness in the application of policies. 

In all cases, formal grievances must be filed and resolved within one semester of the 
occurrence of the event being grieved. Summer enrollment period is considered as a 
semester. 

A student who has a grievance must attempt to resolve it by using the following procedures: 

1 . Prior to initiating a formal grievance, the student must attempt to resolve the matter on 
an informal basis by speaking to the person with whom the complaint rests. 

2. If unable to reach a resolution, the student must discuss the matter with the 
department chair who supervises the person against whom the complaint is lodged to 
attempt to resolve the matter. 

3. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student proceeds to the dean of the 
college in which the grievance resides. 

4. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student proceeds to the Office of the Vice 
President of Academic Affairs where a formal grievance may be filed. 

To initiate the formal grievance process the student informs the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs in writing of his or her intent to seek formal redress through the grievance procedure, 
indicating the nature of the complaint. 



Academics - 



Within 14 calendar days of receipt of the written complaint, the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs will convene the academic grievance committee and provide the chair of the committee 
with the student's statement of complaint. The academic grievance committee is composed of 
one administrator and one faculty member appointed by the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs, and the academic affairs coordinator of student government. 

At least two days in advance of the hearing, the chair of the committee will notify the grievant 
and the individual charged with the complaint of the date, time and place of the hearing, the 
specification and nature of the complaint, and the composition of the committee. 

The grievance hearing is an internal review and, as such, shall be private. The grievant may 
be assisted by a faculty representative. However, persons external to the university shall be 
excluded. The use of outside counsel is prohibited. 

Both the grievant and the person being grieved have the right to be present when charges and 
evidence are presented to the committee, and to provide evidence in support of their 
respective positions. Committee members may question witnesses to evaluate all the relevant 
facts of a given case. Witnesses shall be excluded except for the period of their questioning. 

The report and recommendation of the committee shall be in writing, including the committee's 
rationale for the decision; the report may include any dissenting opinions. Only those 
committee members who have heard all testimony and evidence in a given case may vote on 
the committee's recommendation. 

The committee's report and recommendation shall be forwarded to the Vice President of 
Academic Affairs within 1 calendar days of the hearing. The Vice President of Academic 
Affairs will make the final determination and formally advise the parties involved in the 
grievance. Penalties for violations of the university's academic integrity policy range from a 
warning to dismissal from the university. The university reserves the right, depending upon the 
severity of the conduct, to dismiss a student for a single violation of the university's academic 
integrity policy. In cases where a student previously has been found to have violated the 
university's academic integrity policy, for which he/she received a penalty less than dismissal 
from the university, and the student is subsequently found to have violated the policy once 
again, the Vice President of Academic Affairs may take more severe action for the subsequent 
violation than that previously imposed for the prior violation(s), up to and including dismissal 
from the university. 

Students who wish to grieve circumstances that prohibit immediate continuation in a program 
or in a sequence of courses (e.g. dismissal from a program or a failing grade), will not be 
permitted to sit in on program or sequenced courses unless and until the grievance is 
favorably resolved. Under such circumstances, the student must file a grievance immediately 
upon receipt of the grade or of the dismissal notification. An expedited grievance process is 
then followed, and the process must be completed before the end of the Add Period. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students who wish to withdraw from the University must go to the Coordinator of Retention 
Management Office, located in the Learning Resource Center, Alumnae Hall to begin the 
withdrawal process. Generally, students who are in good academic standing both in their 
program and institutionally at the time of withdrawal, are granted a period of up to one 
calendar year from the time of withdrawal to return to the institution. In extraordinary 
circumstances, students may request an extension of this time period. Requests for an 
extension must be submitted in writing to the coordinator of retention management who will 
consult with the appropriate department chairs. 



50 Academics 



This policy does not bind the institution to offer the student's curriculum or major program, 
which may have been discontinued or substantially altered during the period in which the 
student was not enrolled. 

The following must be completed before an official withdrawal can be granted: 

• Return books to the library. 

• Return residence hall keys to a member of the residence life staff. 

• Return parking permit, student ID, and mailbox key to the coordinator of retention 
management. 

• Clear student balance in student financial services, located on the 1st floor of Mercy 
Hall 

• Complete withdrawal form and exit interview. 

The date of withdrawal will be determined by the completion of the above. That date will 
determine if any refund of tuition is warranted. Cancellation of charges will depend on the date 
that the withdrawal is official (see refund policy). 

Withdrawal from a Course 

A student may withdraw from a course from the end of the fourth through the eighth week of 
the semester (see academic calendar for specific date) only with the signatures of both the 
instructor and the student's academic advisor(s). A grade of "W" will be issued for the course 
at that time. A student may withdraw from a course for medical reasons, supported by a 
written excuse from a physician, or for other serious circumstances, approved by the Vice 
President of Academic Affairs in consultation with the course instructor. 

The student is responsible for initiating the withdrawal process by obtaining a withdrawal form 
from the registrar's office, having it signed by the appropriate personnel, and returning it to the 
registrar's office within the eight week period described above. A grade of "F" will be assigned 
by the instructor and recorded for all courses in which no official withdrawal has been 
completed by the student. 

Note: Students taking classes exclusively on weekends may contact the Center for Adult and 
Continuing Education for assistance in completing these requirements. 



Special Programs 



Alternative Learners Project 

Students with disabilities may apply to participate in the Alternative Learners Project. The ALP 
is a structured program that provides selected students with an assortment of specialized 
services. Services include learning strategies training, support from a program coordinator 
and educational accommodations. Accommodations are provided through individualized 
programs of accommodations (POA), which establish sen/ices to be provided during the 
semester. Information is available from the admissions office or from the Alternative Learners 
Project Staff. Students participating in ALP will be charged a fee of $500 per semester. 

First-Year Experience 

The First-Year Experience (FYE) Program at Misericordia University provides students the 
opportunity to acclimate to the university experience. Through weekly classroom workshops in 
the first semester, all first-year students will explore topics such as: the charisms and the 
work of Sr. Catherine McAuley; ethical behavior and academic integrity; information literacy: 
Misericordia University's Guaranteed Placement Program (GPP); and, advising and 



Special Programs 5 1 



registration. FYE sections are divided by college to allow students an opportunity to apply 
time management, test-taking and other study skills to their coursework. In addition, each 
student receives focused instruction to develop skills needed for particular areas of study. 
FYE also provides first-year students with an opportunity to develop a support network 
consisting of fellow students, student service personnel, and faculty. 

Honors Program 

The honors program is an interdisciplinary community of undergraduate students and faculty 
working together to create an intellectually stimulating and challenging environment for 
learning. Honors students take a common sequence of core curriculum courses, participate 
each semester in the Honors Explorations Seminar, and produce a professional quality paper 
or project as part of the Honors Capstone. The honors program also sponsors a variety of 
extra-curricular programs, such as travel to local and regional historical venues and cultural 
events, opportunities for presenting original research, and participation in conferences 
sponsored by the National Collegiate Honors Council and other colleges and universities. 
Program-related decisions are made and activities are planned with input from both honors 
faculty and students. Honors students also receive recognition on their transcript, at university 
awards ceremonies, and at commencement. 

The academic portion of the honors program consists of three components. The first is an 
alternative 36-credit core sequence in the humanities and social sciences. All students must 
complete a core curriculum, but honors students take humanities and social sciences classes 
with a special emphasis on written responses (science and math requirements are taken as 
part of the regular core). Honors classes are not necessarily harder, but approach course 
material in different ways. They tend to be small and interactive, emphasize discussion and 
critical analysis, and use primary sources in addition to textbooks. Additionally, honors courses 
are interdisciplinary, linked by common principles and ideas. All honors core courses are listed 
as "Section 07" in each semester's schedule of classes. In combination they include: two 
semesters of English, fine arts, history, philosophy, and religious studies, plus one semester of 
psychology and either sociology or economics. Elective honors courses in math, science, and 
the health sciences also may be offered. 

The second academic component requires student participation in the non-credit Explorations 
Seminar (HNR 300), which meets three times per semester. Within this seminar, students and 
faculty together explore a theme or topic that often relates to issues being explored in the 
honors courses. While the seminar may take different forms, such as a debate, a roundtable, 
or a guest lecture, it always involves discussion among students and faculty. 

The final academic component of the program is the Capstone Project (HNR 401 ) in which 
students create a professional-quality project that advances their research and presentation 
skills. Students develop their projects after a process of self-directed research and writing 
under faculty guidance. The final projects are presented in a public forum to the university 
community and published in the honors journal Honorus. 

Students are admitted to the honors program by application only. Admissions decisions for 
first-year students are based on high school academic record, involvement in extra-curricular 
activities, evidence of intellectual curiosity, and overall "fit" with the program. Application 
materials may be requested by any qualified, interested high school senior. In addition, current 
and transfer students can determine their eligibility for admission to the program by contacting 
the program director. To remain in the honors program, students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in 
their first and sophomore years, and a 3.25 GPA subsequently. 



52 Special Programs 



All honors courses are open to non-honors first-year students and sophomores with a 3 GPA 
or higher, and to juniors and seniors with a 3.25 GPA or higher, with the professor's approval 
and assuming space is available. 

Act 101 Program 

ACT 101 is a Pennsylvania state grant funded program that provides academic and personal 
support to qualified students. Its primary goal is to assist students in developing strong 
academic skills, leadership potential, and positive study habits. Services provided by the 
program include academic support; peer tutoring; professional tutoring; personal counseling; 
peer support; leadership development; workshops; and career exploration. The ACT 101 
Program is located in the Learning Resource Center, in the lower level of Alumnae Hall. 

Early Alert 

The Early Alert Program is a referral process used to enhance the retention of our students. 
Faculty, staff, students, or parents who are concerned about a student submit referrals to the 
Coordinator of Retention Management for intervention assessments. After the initial 
assessment, the student will be directed to the appropriate service (i.e., academic support, 
tutoring, personal counseling, Insalaco Center for Career Development, writing/math labs, 
minority mentoring, etc.). 

TARGET 

TARGET is an academic support program sponsored by the Learning Resource Center. 
Designed for first-year students who are placed on academic probation after their first 
semester, TARGET is a required, semester-long intervention program. Students enrolled in 
TARGET will attend a variety of workshops and small group meetings designed to explore and 
address both the academic and affective behaviors that contributed to their placement on 
academic probation. In addition to workshops and small group meetings, students will work 
with a learning specialist and peer learning assistants who will help them develop effective 
study and time management skills. The peer learning assistants also serve as tutors for the 
students enrolled in the program. 

Consortium Programs 

Students at Misericordia University may register for courses at King's College and/or Wilkes 
University in Wilkes-Barre, if those courses are not part of Misericordia's curricula. The 
program is reciprocal. Full-time students in good academic standing who meet specific course 
prerequisites are eligible. Ordinarily, cross registration is available only to juniors and seniors 
who have received permission from their major department to participate in the program. 
Cross-registered courses are considered part of a student's regular course load; no additional 
tuition fees are charged and courses carry full academic credit and grade value. 

Study Abroad Programs 

Misericordia University works with a multitude of study abroad programs across the country. 
Students may choose to study abroad for one or two semesters, normally in their junior year. 
Students must consult with their academic advisor regarding courses and number of credits to 
be taken at the institution abroad. Students who wish to use courses taken abroad to satisfy 
specific course requirements at Misericordia University, whether in the core or the major, must 
secure the approval in advance of the appropriate department chair. For more information, 
contact the Insalaco Center for Career Development. 



Special Programs 53 



All study abroad credits are treated as transfer credits. Students planning a study abroad 
experience must consult with the director of financial aid to determine appropriate financial 
responsibility. 

Tutorial Assistance 

Misericordia University offers a variety of tutorial options to assist students in achieving 
academic goals. Individual and group tutoring is provided in most core curriculum courses and 
some professional courses. Professional staff is available to assist those students who wish to 
improve their study skills. Tutorial services are provided by the Learning Resource Center 
which is located in the lower level of Alumnae Hall. All tutorial services are free of charge. 

Air Force ROTC 

Through cooperative programs with Wilkes University, Misericordia University students can 
take part in Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps. The Air Force ROTC program is based 
at Wilkes University. Students who participate in ROTC at this institution do so without penalty 
to their full-time academic status at Misericordia University. Free elective courses are awarded 
by the University for ROTC participation. Tuition for ROTC courses is paid directly to the 
institutions offering the programs. More information about ROTC may be obtained from the 
registrar. 

Army ROTC Military Science 

Misericordia University offers students the opportunity to participate in Army ROTC at King's 
College in nearby Wilkes-Barre through the Northeast Pennsylvania (NEPA) Reserve Officer 
Training Corps Battalion. The NEPA Army ROTC Battalion continually ranks in the top 10% of 
all ROTC programs nationwide and was ranked third in the eastern United States Army ROTC 
region in 2006. The NEPA Battalion has recently celebrated fifty years of commissioning 
outstanding officers for America's military. Students who participate in this program do so 
without penalty to their full-time academic status. The University awards free elective credit for 
participation in any ROTC course. Any Misericordia University student may participate in any 
ROTC basic course program for two years without cost or obligation. 

The primary objective of the Reserve Officer Training Program is to develop leadership 
capabilities in students and to train future officers for the active Army, US Army Reserve, the 
Army National Guard as well as leaders for the civilian community. The Army ROTC program 
can be tailored to fit any student's schedule, particularly in the freshman and sophomore 
years. Military science instruction is offered at King's College campus with two, three and four 
programs of study leading to a commission as an officer in one of the three components of the 
United States Army. To be commissioned as a second lieutenant, students must pass a 
physical examination and complete the two, three, or four-year program of military science 
courses. Students normally take one course per semester during their normal four-year course 
of study although there are numerous means to meet each student's academic needs. 

All students receiving ROTC scholarship benefits as well as sophomores, juniors and seniors 
that are contracted with the Army receive a monthly stipend. The stipend starts at $300 per 
month during their freshman year, increases to $350 during their sophomore year, $450 during 
their junior year and $500 during their senior year. The stipend is paid directly to the student 
each month that they are in school. The military science department provides all uniforms, 
equipment and textbooks required for the classes at no cost to the student. 

In addition to academic classes, students may also participate on a voluntary basis in many 
additional training opportunities such as physical training and hands-on equipment training 
each week. Each semester there is a military social event and at least one optional weekend 
training session that includes such events as military marksmanship, cross country 



54 Special Programs 



orienteering, military rappelling, leadership application courses and obstacle/confidence 
courses. During breaks and vacations students can volunteer for active army training such as 
military parachute operations, helicopter operations, military mountain climbing and training 
with active army units in the United States and overseas. There are also numerous academic 
internships with state and federal agencies available through Army ROTC. All training is cost 
free to the student and students are paid for some summer training courses. 

The ROTC program consists of two primary programs, the basic course normally given during 
the freshman year and sophomore year consisting of MIL 211/212, MIL 221/222 and MIL 
251/252. The advanced courses normally taken during the junior and senior years consists of 
MIL 231/232, MS 241/242, and MS 251/252. MIL 100 Physical Fitness Training is encouraged 
for all students participating in Army ROTC. 

Students who have completed basic training in any U.S. service may qualify for placement into 
the advanced course. Additionally students who have not completed the ROTC basic course 
may qualify for the advanced course by attending a paid four week long leadership training 
course conducted each summer at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Freshman and sophomore students 
can compete for two, two and one half, and three year ROTC scholarships that pay up to full 
tuition and fees per year and $1200 per year for books. Special nurse, Army National Guard 
and Army Reserve Scholarships are also available. 

The Army will commission successful graduates as a second lieutenant with a starting salary 
of over $33,000 per year plus medical and dental benefits as well as 30 days paid vacation per 
year. 

For more information on the Army ROTC program at Misericordia University contact the 
Military Science Department at 570-208-5900 ext. 5305 or ext. 5301 . 



Military Science Course Descriptions (MIL) 

100 Physical Fitness Training 1 credit 

U.S. Army Master Fitness trainers supervise a comprehensive fitness program based on 
the latest military fitness techniques and principles. The classes are conducted on 
Mondays at the King's College Scandlon Fitness Center and are one hour. 

21 1/2 Concepts of Leadership I & II 1 credit 

Instruction focuses on providing a basic understanding of the Army and general military 
knowledge and skills while concentrating on leadership skills and civic responsibilities 
important to everyone. Classes are one hour each week. 

221/2 Dynamics of Leadership I & II 2 credits each 

Instruction is designed to familiarize students with basic military leadership at the junior 
leader and immediate supervisor level. Classes are two hours each week. 

231/2 Basic Military Leadership I & II 2/1 credits 

Instruction focuses on continued leadership development. Students are trained and 
evaluated on developing, managing and presenting training to the MS I & II cadets. The 
goal of the MSIII year is to prepare students for the National Advanced Leadership 
Camp. Classes are two hours each week. Prerequisite: Advanced placement credit. 

241/2 Advanced Military Leadership I & II 2/1 credits 

Instruction focuses on teaching students to function as a member of a staff and continue 
to develop leadership skills. This course covers public speaking, military briefing, 
effective writing as well as training management and administrative and logistical 
support. Classes are two hours each week. 



Special Programs 55 



251/2 Leadership Application Laboratory no credit 

This class focuses on hands-on application and reinforcement of classroom instruction 
as well as teaching weapons, first aid, land navigation and tactical leadership. This class 
meets at various locations in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area for two hours each week 
and is highly encouraged for students in the basic course and is required for students in 
the advanced course. 



Center for Adult and Continuing Education 

Misericordia University offers a variety of educational options for non-traditional students: 
those students who attend part-time, those who did not go to college right after high school 
and those with some prior college experience. 

The Center for Adult and Continuing Education is sensitive to the alternative needs of students 
with families, full-time jobs, or both. Evening classes are held every semester and during the 
summer. Many non-traditional students find weekend, accelerated evening and online classes 
convenient. All of the university's academic and student services facilities are available to 
students. Similarly, such students must comply with the university regulations. The adult 
learner can access a variety of academic and support services including individualized 
academic assistance; SIGI PLUS, a computerized career guidance system to help students 
determine vocational paths that best suit their work values, interests and abilities; periodic 
workshops on topics such as study skills, job search, and interview techniques; free tutoring; 
and a variety of credit options outside of the classroom (see Credit Option Outside the 
Classroom). 

Flexible Schedules for Adults 

Part-time Day and Evening 

Flexible scheduling enables many students to work towards a degree without giving up full- 
time work or family care. The Center for Adult and Continuing Education is open while 
students are on campus, including weekends and evenings. 

Accelerated Evening Classes on Campus 

The accelerated evening classes are designed for part-time adult learners who must balance 
family and career responsibilities while pursuing their education. Classes meet in "terms" 
which consist of seven Monday or Thursday evenings (5:40 pm-9:40 pm). Two terms per 
semester are offered. Students may take up to two classes per term, which allows them to 
accelerate their course load. 

Expressway 

Expressway: Misericordia University at Luzerne County Community College (LCCC), 
Nanticoke and Hazleton Campuses; Northampton Community College (NCC), Monroe 
Campus; and Lackawanna College (LC) in Scranton 

The Expressway Program is an accelerated, bachelor's degree completion program designed 
for students who have an associate's degree or equivalent and at least three years' work or 
relevant life experience. Classes are held at LCCC in Nanticoke, Hazleton, NCC in 
Tannersville, and LC in Scranton one evening per week. Classes are also held in Nanticoke 
every third Saturday. Online classes also are available. Classes are scheduled in five-week or 
seven-week formats. Students can earn up to 12 credits in a 15-week semester. This program 
is also available for students who want to earn a second bachelor's degree or a certificate. 



56 Special Programs 



Expressway faculty are professionals within a field of expertise and have been carefully 
selected and trained to facilitate adult learners in this innovative learning environment. For 
further information contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education Office at (570) 674- 
6791 or 674-3021. 



Weekend College Classes on Campus 

Weekend College is a special accelerated educational model for adult learners who must 
balance family and career responsibilities while pursuing their education. Students may earn 
credit toward a degree by attending classes every other weekend. The program emphasizes 
independent, self-motivated study. Weekend College classes meet on Saturdays and/or 
Sundays (8am-noon and/or 1pm-5pm). 

For further information contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education at (570) 674- 
6450 or 674-6451. 



Credit Options Outside the Classroom 

Misericordia University recognizes that significant, meaningful learning often occurs in settings 
other than structured, university-sponsored courses. For adult students who would like to 
receive credit for knowledge they have already acquired, College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) and Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) permit them to translate their learning into 
college credit. No more than a total of 40 credits may be earned through credit options outside 
the classroom. 

CLEP: College Level Examination Program 

CLEP allows adult students to demonstrate their knowledge in a wide range of subject areas. 
CLEP examinations are standardized tests that measure a person's knowledge of the material 
covered in introductory college courses. The knowledge may have been obtained through on- 
the-job experiences, professional workshops, classes at business or technical schools, 
volunteer activities, or vocational pursuits. CLEP credits are treated as transfer credits and are 
awarded on a credit/no credit basis. Only passing grades appear on transcripts. Call the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education at (570) 674-6450 for more information. 

Contract Learning 

Contract learning provides students the convenience of continuing their academic studies 

despite temporary work or family demands that prevent them from attending regularly 

scheduled classes. An independent study arrangement, contract learning can be set up for 

either course offerings from our catalog or for topics that students would like to study in more 

depth. 

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Credits 

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) credits provide students the opportunity to validate their 
relevant learning in a written document called a portfolio. The portfolio information is organized 
to correspond as closely as possible to comparable courses from Misericordia's inventory of 
undergraduate offerings. Emphasis is placed on the satisfactory presentation of the student's 
knowledge relative to each course's learning objectives. 

For challenged courses, a faculty assessor from the involved department, will be selected by 
that college's dean. The assessors will review the portfolio according to the following criteria: 
the learning will be demonstrated to be college level; the learning is current, particularly in 
quickly-changing fields such as computer science and business; the learning must be able to 
be generalized and transferred, i.e., it can be applied outside of the specific context or 
situation in which it was acquired; the learning must be measurable; the learning must have a 



Special Programs 57 



theoretical as well as a practical component; credits will be awarded for competence and 
actual learning outcomes, not merely the experience; the credits awarded will not duplicate 
other earned credits. This includes transfer, CLEP, and/or completed course credits, ACT, 
PEP exams, etc. 

Students who request assessment of their prior learning must: 

1 . Be matriculated at the university with a declared major; 

2. Limit requests for assessment to those course areas that will fulfill degree 
requirements in their declared major; 

3. Have had all transfer credits officially evaluated prior to attempting this credit option. 

Students will not be required to have any previously earned university credits; thus there will 
be no minimum GPA requirements. Students who have been awarded prior learning 
assessment credits at another institution will not automatically be awarded such credit in 
transfer. Students have the opportunity to present their portfolios, with updated information, to 
the PLA committee. The option for prior learning assessment will be available only during fall 
and spring semesters. For more information contact the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education at (570) 674-3021. 

Women with Children Program 

The Women with Children Program is designed for academically qualified single mothers and 
provides the opportunity to live on campus with their children while attending classes. 

Non-credit Programs 

For individuals interested in professional and personal development, the Center for Adult and 

Continuing Education offers a variety of credit-free programs, classes and workshops. 

The Fitness and Fun Program offers special programs, camps, non-credit courses and 
workshops for children, students, employees, alumni, and the community. 

For further information, contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education at (570) 674- 
6289. 



Academic Program Definitions 



Academic programs fall into six inter-related groups: majors, specializations, certificates, 
certifications, minors, and elective areas of study. These program areas are defined below. 

Majors Areas of study in a formal discipline for which a degree is 

awarded; for example, a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History, a 
Bachelor of Social Work Degree in Social Work, a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Mathematics, or a Master of Science Degree in 
Occupational Therapy. 

Minors Focused programs of study which involve specific clusters of 

courses around a general area of study. Minors are not associated 
with particular degree programs and are therefore open to all 
undergraduate students. For example, minors are available in 
writing, philosophy, and religious studies. 



58 Academic Program Definitions 



Specializations 



Certificates 



Certifications 



Elective Areas of Study 



Specializations are focused programs of extended study closely 
associated with a specific degree program Specializations are 
generally available only to students who have been accepted into 
the major for the specific degree, for example, BA, History (Pre- 
law) or BS, Biology (Pre-medicine). 

Certificates are awarded to students who complete specified 
coursework independent of a defined degree program. Certificate 
programs are offered in addictions counseling, child welfare 
services, gerontology, informatics and diagnostic medical 
sonography. A graduate level pediatric certificate is available for 
practicing occupational and physical therapists. 
NOTE: Completion of a certificate program does not equate to 
certification in any of the programs. 

Certifications are prescribed programs of study designed to meet 
requirements of official agencies which recognize the certification 
as a valid credential. For example, certifications are available in 
early childhood education which is recognized by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. 

There are clusters of courses which are not as a group directly 
associated with a specific degree program. Elective courses are 
intended to augment the liberal arts background of any interested 
students. For example, electives are available in philosophy or 
sociology. 



Academic Program Listings 



Specific Degree 
Programs 



Minor Programs 



Course Descriptions 



In the academic program listings which follow, majors, 
specializations, and certifications are combined into one section 
and are listed alphabetically by program name. They have been 
grouped together by virtue of a common factor; each requires 
defined course sequences. 

Minors, page 270, which are open to all students, may be taken in 
association with any degree program. Minors involve 15 to 22 
credits in specific areas. The minors offered and the course 
requirements are listed in alphabetical order. 
Specific information regarding every course offered may be found 
in the course descriptions section. See also core curriculum 
requirements, page 63. 



Academic Program Listings 



Undergraduate and Graduate Curricula Academic Colleges 

Misericordia University's academic programs are administered by three distinct colleges. The 
programs offered by each college are listed below. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Majors 



Minors 



Certificates/Certifications 



Specializations 



Biochemistry, page 70 

Biology, page 72 

Chemistry, page 86 
Clinical Laboratory Science, page 91 
Communications, page 94 
Computer Science, page 99 

English, page 103 
History, page 119 

Interdisciplinary Studies, page 268 
Mathematics, page 133 

Philosophy, page 192 
Biology, page 272 

Chemistry, page 273 
Communications, page 274 
Computer Science, page 275 

English, page 275 
EthiCS, page 276 
History, page 280 

Mathematics, page28i 

Philosophy, page 282 

Political Science, page 282 
Religious Studies, page 284 

Social Studies, page 286 
Theater, page 287 
Writing, page 287 

Secondary Education, Biology, page 248 
Secondary Education, Chemistry, page 252 
Secondary Education, English, page 250 
Secondary Education, History, page 254 
Secondary Education, Mathematics, page 256 

Spanish, page 307 

Pre-dentistry, page 313 

Pre-law, page 313 

Pre-medicine, page 313 
Pre-optometry, page 313 
Pre-veterinary medicine, page3i3 



Undergraduate and Graduate Curricula Academic Colleges 



College of Health Sciences 



Majors 



Health Science, BS degree for professional master's degree 

Students, page 268 

Nursing, BSN, (Traditional and Part-time Accredited Evening Nursing 

Program (PTAENP), RN-BSN, RN-MSN, MSN (FNP and CNS), page 158 

Medical Imaging, BS, page 137 

Occupational Therapy, Entry-level Professional, MSOT, (Traditional 

& Weekend Format), page 174 

Occupational Therapy, Post-professional, MS, page360 

Occupational Therapy Post Professional OTD, page 366 

Physical Therapy, Entry-level Professional, MSPT, page 388 

Physical Therapy, Entry-level Professional DPT, page 397 

Physical Therapy, Post-professional, tDPT, page404 

Speech-language Pathology, MSSLP, page2i6 



Minors 



Health Care Informatics, page 279 
Management (Medical Imaging Majors), page 146 



Specializations 



Management (Medical Imaging Majors), page 1523 

Nursing Sub-Specialization - CNS Nursing Administration, page 345 

CNS Nursing Education, page 3450 



Certificates/Certifications Diagnostic Medical Sonography, page 153 

Nursing Education, page 345 

Family Nurse Practitioner, page 309 

Health Care Informatics, page 309 

Pediatrics (for Practicing Occupational and Physical Therapists), page 309 

Teacher Certification in Speech and Language Disabilities, page 405 
The College of Health Sciences offers entry-level professional master's of science degrees in 
occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology; post-professional master 
of science degrees in nursing and occupational therapy, post-professional doctor of physical 
therapy and occupational therapy degrees and a first professional physical therapy degree 
(See Graduate Curricula, page 324). 



College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 



Majors 



Accounting, page 67 

Business Administration, page 79 
Education, Graduate, page 330 
Elementary Education, page 242 
Health Care Management, page 112 
Information Technology, page 125 
Management, page 130 
Marketing, page 132 

Masters of Business Administration, page 324 
Professional Studies, page 269 

Psychology, page 199 
Social Work, page 208 

Special Education, page 258 



Undergraduate and Graduate Curricula Academic Colleges t 



Minors 



Sport Management, page 232 

Organizational Management - Graduate, page 372 

Accounting, page 270 

Addictions Counseling, page 270 

Child Welfare Services, page 273 

Gerontology, page 276 

Health Care Informatics, page 279 

Management (for Medical Imaging Majors), page 146 

Management, page280 

Management Information Systems, page280 

Marketing, page28i 

Psychology, page 283 



Certificates/Certifications 



Addictions Counseling, page 297 

Child Welfare Services, page 297 

Early Childhood Education, page 2343 

Elementary Education, page 245 

Gerontology, page 309 

Geriatric Care Manager, page 306 

Health Care Informatics, page 309 

Health Care Management, page 118 

Secondary Education, page 248 

Special Education, page 258 

Teaching English as a Second Language - Graduate, page 307 



Specializations Addictions Counseling, page 312 

Child Welfare Services, page 312 
Educational Strategies, Graduate, page 337 
Elementary Education, Graduate, page 334 
Gerontology, page 276 

Health Care Informatics (Health Care Management Major), page 312 
Health Care Management (Health Care Management Major), page 312 
Health Care Marketing (Health Care Management Major), page 312 
Human Resource Management, Graduate, page 373 
Information Technology Management, Graduate, page 374 
Instructional Technology, Graduate, page 333 
IT Security, (Information Technology Major), page3i2 
Management, Graduate, page 374 

Management Information Systems (Information Technology), page 280 
Marketing, Graduate, page 374 
Selected Sequence (Business), pageso 
Special Education, Graduate, page 234 
Supervisor of Instruction and Curriculum, Graduate, page 333 

The College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences offers master's of science degrees in 
organizational management, business administration, education, and educational technology 
(see Graduate Curricula, page 324). 



62 Undergraduate and Graduate Curricula Academic Colleges 



Core Curriculum Requirements 



All undergraduate students, regardless of major, are required to complete a minimum of 48 
credit hours of core courses. These courses must be taken in accordance with the following 
distribution of credit hours by area of study described below, and must be selected from the 
list of core course titles, or from the list of approved substitutes noted below. 

Some courses must be taken in sequence and in both semesters of courses which are offered 
over two semesters. 

Students who have taken English Composition at Misericordia University or at another 
college/university and have received a grade of "C" or better in that course are exempted from 
the writing intensive course requirement. 

Area of Study Credits 

Behavioral Science 6 

English Literature 6 

Fine Arts 6 

History or Political Science 6 

Mathematics* 6 

Philosophy 6 

Religious Studies 6 

Natural Science 6-8 

*Mathematics Bank I 

Determined by Mathematics Department 



MTH 120 
MTH 151 
MTH 160 



Mathematical Reasoning 

Calculus I 

Discrete Mathematics 



Mathematics Bank II 
Specified by Program 

MTH 115 
MTH 151 
MTH 152 
MTH 160 



Statistics 

Calculus I 

Calculus II 

Discrete Mathematics 



Core Areas Required Course Course Title 

Credits Number 
Behavioral Science 6 PSY 123 
Select any two SOC 101 

BUS 207 



Credits 



Introduction to Psychology 
Comparative Sociology 
Contemporary Economics 



English 
Select any two 



ENG 101C Literature of Values: Ancient and Medieval 3 

ENG 102M Literature of Discovery: Modern/Early Modern 3 

ENG 104M Literature of Discovery: American Literature 3 

ENG 108G African American Literature 3 

ENG 109G Modern World Literature 3 

ENG111G Literature of American Immigrants 3 



Core Curriculum Requirements 63 



Fine Arts 

TakeFA102Cand 
FA 104M, or take 
either of the above 
plus one "G" course 



History/Political 
Science 



Select one 
sequence 



Mathematics 



Philosophy 

Take PHL 100 and 

select one other 



Religious Studies 
Select any two 



FA102C 


Cultural Synthesis in Ancient World 


3 


FA104M 


Art, Self, Community in the Modem World 


3 


FA 205G 


Jazz Age Culture 


3 


FA 206G 


Voices of Liberation 


3 


FA 207G 


World Music 


3 


HIS 101C 


Western Civilization I 


3 


HIS 102M 


Western Civilization II 


3 


or 
HIS 103M 


US History I 


3 


HIS104G 

or 
POL100M 


US History II 


3 


American National Government 


3 


POL103G 


Global Politics 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 




Mathematics Bank II 


3 


PHL100C 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


PHL 102M 


Introduction to Ethics 


3 


PHL105M 


Introduction to Logic 


3 


PHL111M 


Makers of the Modern Mind (Honors) 


3 


PHL 202G 


Environmental Philosophy 


3 


PHL205C 


Medieval Philosophy 


3 


PHL210M 


Philosophy of Person 


3 


PHL220M 


Philosophy and Literature 


3 


PHL 223M 


Social Ethics 


3 


PHL 257M 


Philosophy of Religion 


3 


PHL261G 


Philosophy of Women 


3 


PHL 270M 


Social and Political Philosophy 


3 


RLS 100C 


Biblical Studies 


3 


RLS104G 


World Religions 


3 


RLS 106M 


Theology and Human Experience 


3 


RLS107G 


Women and Spirituality 


3 


RLS 113M 


Theology of the Church 


3 


RLS114C 


Introduction to Christian Thought 


3 


RLS115M 


Religion in America 


3 


RLS 116M 


American Catholicism 


3 


RLS120G 


Mayan Religion and Culture 


3 



64 Core Curriculum Requirements 



Natural Sciences 
Select one 
sequence 



6-8 BIO 103-104 General Biology I and II 

BIO 101-102 General Botany and Zoology 

CHM 101-102 Chemistry in Context I & II 

CHM 104-105 General Chemistry and Introduction to 

Organic Chemistry 

CHM 133-134 Chemical Principles 

PHY 107-108 Introduction to Physics I and II 

PHY 117-118 Physics Introduction I & II 

PHY 221-222 General Physics 



Free Elective Credits 



6-8 
8* 



Distribution 

Students are required to choose among the American History, Western Civilization, or political 
science sequences. Students must take 6 credits in each of the humanities disciplines: 
history/political science, literature, fine arts, philosophy and religious studies. These 30 
credits must also be distributed as follows: 12 credits of courses designated ancient and 
medieval (C); 12 credits of modern (M); and 6 credits designated global/multicultural (G). In 
addition, at least two of the core courses in humanities must be designated "writing intensive." 
The designation will appear in the schedule of classes offered each semester. 

Free Electives 

Courses taken as part of a minor, specialization, or certification may be included as the nine 
credits of free electives, provided that they are outside the major. Students are encouraged to 
take additional free electives whenever their program of study permits. 

Writing Proficiency Requirement 

The writing proficiency requirement is a non-credit graduation requirement for all students at 
Misericordia University. Transfer students who have taken an English composition course prior 
to matriculating at Misericordia University and who received a grade of "C" or better are 
exempted from this requirement. The requirement may be satisfied in one of two ways: 

1 . Students may take Composition (ENG 103), and achieve a grade of "C" or better 

2. Students may pass the Writing Proficiency Examination, administered twice each 
academic year in November and April. 

Students are eligible to sit for the writing proficiency examination during the first semester of 
their sophomore year, provided that they have completed at least one writing intensive course 
in the past or are currently enrolled in a writing intensive course. If they do not pass the 
examination the first time, students may take the examination a second time during the second 
semester of their sophomore year. Students who have not passed the examination by the 
beginning of their junior year must attend mandatory workshops sponsored by the Writing 
Center and the Learning Resource Center during the first half of the first semester of their 
junior year before they can sit for the examination that semester. Students who fail the 
examination a third time will be required to take Composition (ENG 103), and receive a grade 
of "C" or better before they may graduate from Misericordia University. 

Technical Competency Requirement 

The technical competency requirement is a non-credit online course designed to provide all 
incoming students with core technology competence for application throughout the academic 
experience and beyond. 



Core Curriculum Requirements 65 



All entering, full-time, matriculating students will automatically be registered for this course. 
The course should be completed within the first three (3) semesters or 45 credit hours. 
Successful completion of the technical competency requirement is a graduation requirement 
for all undergraduate students at Misericordia University. 

The course will consist of four (4) modules, as follows: 

• Information literacy 

• General computer operation 

• Computer communications and networks 

• Office management and productivity 

The technical competency requirement will use a grading system of "S" or "U." If the student 
does not complete the courses in the first semester, they will receive an "IP" (which WILL NOT 
rollover to an "F"). The student who does not complete this competency will be automatically 
re-enrolled the following semester in the technical competency course. 

Students who complete (or have completed) either Basic Computer Technology (BUS 105) or 
Educational Technology (TED 121) with a "C "or higher automatically meet the technology 
competency requirement. 

The Misericordia University Guidelines for Appropriate Computing Behavior will be applicable. 

* Courses with an asterisk require a stronger background in mathematics and science. 



66 Core Curriculum Requirements 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Accounting Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree Four-year Track BS, Accounting, Five-year Track BS, Accounting and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

Accounting is the language of business that allows different entities to communicate effectively 
with each other. The accounting profession provides this vital service to management and 
owners of business firms, investors, creditors, labor unions, government agencies, and, most 
importantly, to the general public. The curriculum of the accounting major is designed to 
provide individuals with communication, critical thinking, and analytical skills, as well as the 
technical proficiency to become professional accountants. 

The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and other accounting organizations 
continually emphasize the value of a broad approach to education. The liberal arts core and 
business support courses that are required of all accounting majors address this need and 
help individuals acquire the necessary skills that will contribute to a productive life and 
satisfying career. The accounting faculty emphasizes the importance of these abilities in 
accounting courses that also contain the profession's technical body of knowledge. Accounting 
courses also integrate an extensive use of computers and standard business software into 
instruction and student assignments. Students are given instruction in business writing and 
presentation skills. 

Work experience is a powerful educational tool in a discipline such as accounting. Thus, on- 
campus interviews are scheduled with accounting firms and companies for student placement 
in accounting internship positions. All accounting majors are encouraged to serve an 
internship in the spring of their senior year. Placement of students in internships is dependent 
upon successful completion of required course work, availability of placement employers, and 
the student's interview. 



Accounting Major Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

For description and requirements of the Five-year track BS, Accounting and MBA, see MBA 
program description. 



First Year 










First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 
Technology 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential 3 
Communications 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 


BUS 208 


Principles of 3 
Management 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 6 7 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Core 

Core 
ACC 340 Intermediate Accounting I 
BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 

Elective 



Junior Year 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Second Semester 
Core 
Core 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 



ACC 341 Intermediate Accounting 3 

II 
MIS 110 Introduction to 3 

Information Systems 
BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

ACC 401 Taxes 3 

Core 3 

ACC 342 Intermediate Accounting III 3 

Senior Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

ACC 440 Advanced Accounting 3 

BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUS 360 Management of Human 3 

Resources 



Total Credits 15 



First Semester 

Core 
BUS 352 Business Law 
ACC 410 Auditing 
BUS 371 Finance 
BUS 415 International Business 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

ACC310 Cost Accounting 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

ACC 472 Internship 6 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Accounting Course Descriptions (ACC) 

101 Principles of Accounting 3 credits 

An introduction to basic accounting principles, concepts, and procedures. Topics include 
the accounting cycle, preparation of financial statements, accounting systems and 
special-purpose journals, internal control methods, inventory costing, short-term liquid 
assets. A manual practice set is completed. 

310 Cost Accounting 3 credits 

A study of the broad range of cost concepts includes job order costing, process costing, 
accounting for materials, labor, and the allocation of factory overhead, standard costs, 
variance analysis, and accounting for joint-products and by-products. Electronic 
spreadsheet projects are completed. 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 



68 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



311 Managerial Accounting 3 credits 

Uses of accounting data in planning and controlling business activities. Manufacturing 
cost systems, budgeting, standard costs, and responsibility accounting are some of the 
topics discussed. Analysis of financial statements are emphasized. Microcomputer 
electronic spreadsheet applications are utilized. Accounting majors should not take this 
course. 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 

340 Intermediate Accounting I 3 credits 
This course explores the theoretical framework, assumptions, and principles associated 
with accounting. Using this body of knowledge, the student completes a practice set and 
solves problems on topics such as the preparation and analysis of financial statements, 
accounting for receivables, inventories, and property, plant and equipment. 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 and BUS 105 

341 Intermediate Accounting II 3 credits 
Continues the in-depth discussion of key accounting issues. This course focuses on 
accounting topics such as depreciation methods, intangible assets, current and long- 
term liabilities, and stockholders' equity issues. 

Prerequisite: ACC 340 

342 Intermediate Accounting III 3 credits 
Concentrates on advanced concepts in accounting. This course focuses on accounting 
concepts such as dilative securities, investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, 
and accounting for pension benefits and leases. 

Prerequisite: ACC 341 

401 Taxes I 3 credits 
The analysis and preparation of federal and state individual income tax returns based on 
current tax law. Tax planning is also stressed 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 or consent of instructor 

402 Taxes II 3 credits 
The analysis and preparation of federal and state corporation, partnership, and fiduciary 
tax returns based on current tax law. Tax consequences of the formation, operation, and 
liquidation of the various forms of a corporation are discussed in-depth. 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 or consent of instructor 

410 Auditing 3 credits 

A systematic evaluation of generally accepted accounting principles and applicable 
auditing principles, standards, and procedures. Other topics include the study and 
evaluation of internal control, verification of account balances, professional ethics, and 
statistical sampling. A practice set is completed. 

Prerequisite: ACC 341 

440 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 credits 

Focuses on several major areas in accounting. The first is accounting for mergers and 
acquisitions. The focus is on the differences between the cost and equity methods of 
accounting for the investment in a subsidiary and the pooling of interest and the 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 69 



purchase methods of recording a business expansion. The second area of interest is 
governmental accounting and accounting for non-profit organizations. The third area is 
partnership accounting and accounting for estates and trusts. 

Prerequisite: ACC 342 or consent of instructor 

472 Accounting Internship 1-6 credits 

These credits provide on-the-job accounting experience for accounting majors with either 
a public accounting firm, government agency, or private industry. Internships are offered 
on a competitive basis following student interviews with prospective companies. 
Accounting internships are reserved for Accounting majors in their senior year who have 
completed all major course work. 

485 Special Topics in Accounting 3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and are announced with pre-registration 
information. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation with the assistance of a faculty member, of a selected topic of 
interest. Approval of college dean and vice-president of academic affairs required 



Biochemistry Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BS, Biochemistry 

Department Chair Charles Saladino, Jr., PhD 

Biochemistry is an exciting and challenging field of study that combines the worlds of 
chemistry and biology into a science that explores the chemistry of bio-molecules and those 
biological processes that support a living system. Modern day biochemistry has reached a 
level of complexity and uniqueness that allows it to stand apart from both of its ancestral 
fields. Today's biochemistry operates in the world of life on earth described by classical 
biology and also probes the complexities of this world on the molecular scale using the 
concepts and analysis techniques derived from the world of classical chemistry. 

The biochemistry major reflects this fusion of both fields as a hybrid of both departments' 
curricula, combining the essential knowledge of a BS chemistry with that of biology on the 
molecular level. We believe that students must first be good chemists before they can be good 
biochemists. Thus, the program is designed to meet the ACS guidelines for a chemistry major 
and the ASBMB guidelines for a biochemistry major, making the program highly 
interdisciplinary between chemistry and biology. The biochemistry program is designed to 
prepare students for graduate school and the pharmaceutical, biomedical, and bio-technology 
industries. 

At the end of their sophomore year and thereafter, biochemistry majors must have and 
maintain a GPA of 2.5 in courses required for the major in order to remain in good standing in 
the program, and a GPA of 3.0 to be recommended for graduate or professional schools. 
Students must earn three credits doing either a summer internship during their junior year 
[CHM 490] or by taking research [CHM 460] in (or before) the first semester of their senior 
year. 



70 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Pre-medicine 

This specialization provides excellent preparation for professional studies in medicine, 
veterinary medicine, and related health sciences. It is suggested that BIO 251 and BIO 252 
(Comparative Anatomy and Histology I, II) be incorporated into the sequence below. In 
addition, BIO 301 (Gross Anatomy) and BIO 302 (Neuroscience) are available as senior 
electives. 



Biochemistry BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses (certain modifications are permitted with approval of the 
department chair) 



First Year 










First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


CHM 133 


Chemical Principles I 


4 


CHM 134 


Chemical Principles II 4 


BIO 101 


General Botany and 


4 


BIO 102 


Zoology 4 




Biology Principles 




MTH 152 


Analytic Geometry & 3 


MTH 151 


Analytic Geometry & 


3 




Calculus II 




Calculus I 




HIS 


History Core 3 


HIS 


History Core 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core 3 


ENG 


Literature Core 


3 







Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry 4 

PHY 221 Physics I 4 

BIO 241 Genetics 4 

MTH 225 Analytic Geometry & 4 

Calculus III 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

CHM 244 Organic Chemistry 4 

PHY 222 Physics II 4 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 

PHL Philosophy Core 3 

CPSSS Core 3 



Junior Year 



First Semester 



CHM 353 Biochemistry I 3 

CHM 363 Biochemistry Lab 1 

CHM 355 Physical Chemistry I 4 

CHM 350 Chemical Literature 1 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 

CPSSS Core 3 



Total Credits 15 Second Semester Total Credits 14 

CHM 354 Biochemistry II 3 

CHM 356 Physical Chemistry II 4 

CHM 411 Instrumental Analysis 3 

CHM 412 Instrumental Lab I 1 

PHL Philosophy Core 3 



Summer Total Credits 3 

CHM 490 Chemistry Internship* 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 7 1 



Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 14 Second Semester Total Credits 16 

Major Elective 3 Major Elective 3 

BIO 435 Cell Biology 3 BIO 441 Molecular Genetics 4 

CHM413 Instrumental Lab II 1 Free Elective 3 

CHM 475 Chemistry Seminar 1 Free Elective 3 

CHM 460 Research * 3 RLS Religious Studies Core 3 

RLS Religious Studies Core 3 Total required for graduation 126 credits 



Major electives can be taken in either chemistry or biology and include: 

Elective chemistry courses include: Elective biology courses include: 

CHM 410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry BIO 243 General Microbiology 

CHM 456 Qualitative Organic Analysis BIO 360 Immunology 

CHM 450 Special Topics BIO 480 Biology Research 

BIO 345 Developmental Biology 

* Student's are required to take a minimum of 3 credits of either CHM 490 or CHM 460 for 
graduation 



Biology Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BS, Biology 

Department Chair Cosima Wiese, PhD 

Faculty 

Angela Asirvatham, Assistant Professor of Biology, DVM Madras Veterinary College; MS 

University of Wyoming; PhD Kent State University 

Michael A. Dexter, Assistant Professor of Biology, BS Guilford College; MS Wake Forest 

University 

Frank DiPino, Professor of Biology, BA State University of New York; PhD Marquette University 

Carl J. Konecke, Associate Professor Emeritus of Biology, BS King's College; MS University of 

Nebraska 

Stanley S. Knapich, Professor Emeritus of Biology, BS Wilkes University; MEd, DEd The 

Pennsylvania State University 

Barbara J. McCraith, Associate Professor of Biology, BS LeMoyne College; MS Winthrop College; 

PhD University of South Carolina 

Anthony Serino, Associate Professor of Biology, BS MS University of Scranton; PhD The 

Pennsylvania State University 

Cosima B. Wiese, Associate Professor of Biology, BA Bucknell University; MSc, PhD The 

Pennsylvania State University 

The biology program is designed to provide a sound background in the various major areas of 
the biological sciences. Given the rate and nature of the current advances, such a background 
requires a supporting foundation in the physical sciences, mathematics and the other liberal 
arts in order to adequately prepare an individual to pursue a career in the field of biology. A 
variety of opportunities exist for post-graduate employment in the pharmaceutical, agricultural, 
biotechnology, food, and chemical industries as well as in government agencies and 
universities. 



72 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



With this foundation and the selection of appropriate elective courses, a biology major is 
prepared for post-graduate studies in medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, podiatry, 
optometry, or for graduate study in various specialties in the biological sciences such as 
molecular biology, neurobiology, genetics, physiology, developmental biology, botany, 
microbiology, and ecology. A biology major is assigned an advisor who helps plan a program 
of courses consistent with the student's interest and career objectives. Majors in Biology must 
maintain at least a "B" cumulative average and a GPA of at least 3.0 to be recommended to 
graduate or professional schools. 

Admissions Requirements: 

Prospective undergraduate applicants must meet both Misericordia University's and the 
Biology department's admission criteria. Students must have the following criteria to be 
considered for acceptance into the Biology program: 

1 . completion of at least one year (each) of high school Biology, Chemistry and pre-Calculus 

2. minimum combined SAT score of 900 

3. minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 

Biology BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 101 General Botany and 4 



ENG 


Biological Principles 
Core 


3 


MTH 115 
HIS 


Statistics 
Core 


HIS 

CHM 133 
MTH 151 


Core 

Chemical Principles I 

Calculus I 


3 
4 
3 


CHM 134 

MTH 152 


Chemical Principles 
Calculus II 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 102 General Zoology 4 

3 
3 
4 
3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

BIO 241 Genetics 4 

BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy 4 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry 1 4 

FA Core 3 

Junior Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 243 General Microbiology 4 

ENG Core 3 

PHL Core 3 

CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 4 

FA Core 3 



First Semester Total Credits 1 6 

BIO 345 Developmental Biology or 

BIO 435 Cell Biology 3 

PHL Core 3 

CHM 353 Biochemistry I 3 

PHY 221 General Physics I 4 

CPS130 Computing for Scientists 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

BIO 346 General Physiology 4 



CHM Free elective 

Free elective 
PHY 222 General Physics II 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 73 



Senior Year 




First Semester Total Credits 14 


Second 


BIO 425 


Ecology 4 


BIO 360 


BIO 490 


Coordinating Seminar 1 


BIO 480 


BIO 


Free elective 3 


RLS 


RLS 


Core 3 


CPSSS 


CPSSS 


Core 3 





nester Total Credits 14 

Immunology 1 

Biology Research 1 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 124 credits 

Pre-dentistry, Pre-medicine, Pre-optometry, Pre-veterinary Medicine 

Grade Requirements 

With the proper selection of elective courses, students who major in biology or chemistry are 
prepared for post-graduate study in medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, and optometry. 

Pre-dentistry 

A student who has completed a bachelor of science in biology or chemistry with a GPA of "B" 
or better, may be recommended to a dental school. Information may be obtained from the 
American Dental Association (www.ada.org), 21 1 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611- 
2678. (312)440-2500. 

Pre-medicine 

A student who has completed a bachelor of science in biology or chemistry with a GPA of "B" 
or better, may be recommended to a medical college. Preparation for application to medical 
school should begin in the first year and continue throughout the undergraduate years. 
Preparation involves a continuous review of material covered in all science courses. Such 
review is imperative for a satisfactory performance on the Medical College Admission Test 
(MCAT) which is required by most medical schools. The MCAT should be taken in the fall 
and/or spring of the junior year. 

Students should be aware of the requirements specific to the medical school they wish to 
attend. This information may be obtained from the Council on Medical Education of the 
American Medical Association (www.ama-assn.org), 535 North Dearborn Street, 515 N. State 
Street, Chicago, IL 60610. (800) 621-8335 

Pre-optometry 

A student who has completed a bachelor of science in biology or chemistry with a GPA of "B" 
or better, may be recommended to a school of optometry. Information may be obtained from 
the American Optometric Association (www.aoa.org), 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, St. 
Louis, MO 63141. (800) 365-2219 

Pre-veterinary Medicine 

A student who has completed a bachelor of science in biology or chemistry with a GPA of "B" 
or better, may be recommended to a veterinary school. Information may be obtained from the 
American Veterinary Medical Association (www.avma.org), 1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 
100, Schaumberg, IL 60173. (847) 925-8070 



74 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Suggested Course of Study, Pre-professional Curriculum 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


BIO 101 


General Botany, 


4 


BIO 102 


General Zoology 4 




Biological Principles 




MTH 115 


Statistics 3 


ENG 


Core 


3 


HIS 


Core 3 


HIS 


Core 


3 


CHM 134 


Chemical Principles II 4 


CHM 133 


Chemical Principles I 


4 


MTH 152 


Calculus II 3 


MTH 151 


Calculus I 


3 







Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

BIO 241 Genetics 4 

BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy, 4 

Histology 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry I 4 

FA Core 3 



Junior Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 8 


BIO 252 


Comparative Anatomy, 4 




Histo technique 


BIO 346 


General Physiology 4 


ENG 


Core 3 


CHM 244 


Organic Chemistry II 4 


FA 


Core 3 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 14 


BIO 345 


Developmental Biology or 




CHM 


Free elective 3 


BIO 435 


Cell Biology 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 


PHY 222 


General Physics II 4 


PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 


BIO 243 


General Microbiology 4 


CHM 353 


Biochemistry 


3 






CPS130 


Computing for Scientists 


3 







Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 14 

BIO 425 Ecology 4 

BIO 490 Coordinating Seminar 1 

Free elective 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

BIO 360 Immunology 1 

BIO 480 Biology Research 1 

Free elective 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 125 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 75 



Biology Course Descriptions (BIO) 

101 General Botany and Biological Principles 4 credits 
Introductory principles of biology and a study of the plant kingdom from thallophytes to 
spermatophytes. Field studies of local plant communities. Introduction to plant anatomy, 
taxonomy and ecology. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Fall only 

102 General Zoology 4 credits 
Zoological principles and their implications in the animal kingdom. Ecological and 
evolutionary tendencies of major vertebrate and invertebrate groups with consideration 
of anatomy and physiology of representatives. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101 or permission from instructor. Spring only 

103/104General Biology 3 credits each 

The study of the fundamental principles and modern theories of biology. Emphasis is on 
the value of biology in relation to humans. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 103 or permission from instructor 

121 Human Structure and Function I 4 credits 
A study of the human body structure and function with emphasis on its cellular control 
and selected systems involving dynamic control, support and movement. 

122 Human Structure and Function II 4 credits 
This course is a study of the human body structure and function with special emphasis 
on it ability to circulate fluids, absorb and excrete, and reproduce. This course is a 
continuation of Biology 121. 

Prerequisite Bio 121 

21 1/212Anatomy and Physiology I & II 4 credits each 

A detailed study of the structure and same function of the human body. Emphasis on 
physiology phenomena and concepts. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 211 or permission from instructor 

227 Bacteriology 4 credits 

General morphology and physiology of bacteria, yeasts, molds, and viruses. Study of 
infection and immunity. Special studies of foods, water, and sewage with reference to 
health and sanitation. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

241 Genetics 4 credits 

A detailed study of the principles of heredity. Both classical and molecular genetics are 
given equal treatment. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHM 134. Fall only 



76 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



243 General Microbiology 4 credits 

Fundamental principles and techniques of microbiology, including general morphology, 
ecology and physiology of microorganisms, methods of study, identification, destruction, 
and control. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours 

Spring only 

251 Comparative Anatomy 4 credits 
A detailed study of the tissues, organs, and selected systems of the human compared to 
those of representative vertebrates. Laboratory dissection and prepared slide studies. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or 104 

252 Histology 4 credits 
A detailed study of the tissues, organs, and selected systems of the human compared to 
those of representative vertebrates. Laboratory dissection, prepared slide studies, and 
techniques of tissue slide preparation. 

Prerequisite: BIO 251 

301 Gross Anatomy 5 credits 
The study of human anatomy, embryology, and histology emphasizing structure and 
function in relationship to simple and complex human movement; inter-relationships of 
neuromuscular and skeletal development and structure (cross-sectional and three- 
dimensional); and appreciation of anatomical differences among individuals. Laboratory 
sessions will include cadaver dissection and will strongly integrate Analysis of Human 
Movement and Applied Physiology. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 6 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 211/212, BIO 251/252, or equivalent. 

Corequisites for PT majors: PT 405 and PT 407 or permission of instructor 

302 Neuroscience 4 credits 
The study of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology; inter-relationships of 
nervous system development and structure as related to function; introduction to 
theories and research regarding postural and motor control and motor learning; applied 
neuroanatomy/physiology as a basic component of servomotor evaluation. Lecture: 3 
hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 211/212, BIO 251/252, or equivalent. 

Prerequisites for PT majors: BIO 301 and PT 407 or permission of instructor 

345 Developmental Biology 3 credits 
A comprehensive study of developmental biology. Genetic, molecular, and cellular 
aspects involved in the regulation of temporal and spatial development will be covered. 
Current experimental systems in the study of developmental biology will be introduced. 
Lecture: 3 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 102, BIO 241. Alternate years 

346 General Physiology 4 credits 
A detailed study of the function of the muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, 
respiratory, and excretory systems. Laboratory experiments deal with the physiology of 
humans and lower vertebrates. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO 251, Chi EM 134. Spring only 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 77 



360 Immunology 1 credit 

Fundamentals of immunology including innate and adaptive immunity, inflammatory 
response, antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity. 

Prerequisites: BIO 102, CHM 243. Spring only (9 weeks) 

413 Biology Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

Prerequisite: 24 credits in Biology. Spring only 

425 Ecology 4 credits 

A study of the inter-relationships between plants, animals, and other components of the 
total environment. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory and field work: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 102, BIO 104, or permission of instructor Fall only 

431 Field Biology 3 credits 

Familiarization with local plants and animals based on actual field observation and 
collection. Includes sampling of forest, field and pond habitats. Lecture and field work: 3 
hours. 

Alternate years 

435 Cell Biology 3 credits 

A detailed study of the morphology and physiology of cells. Special emphasis is placed 
on the inter-relationship between molecular structure and cell function. 

Prerequisites: BIO 241, CHM 353 

(may be taken concurrently). Alternate years 

441 Molecular Genetics 4 credits 

A study of the molecular basis of information storage, regulation, processing, and 
expression. Structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, and their interactions are 
discussed. Molecular approaches used in contemporary biology will be covered with 
specific attention to plant biotechnology, gene therapy, transgenic organisms, and 
cloning. Laboratory will focus on current molecular biology methodology including DNA 
sequencing, recombinant DNA technology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 
Lecture: 3 hours Lab: 3 hours 

Prerequisites: BIO 241 

480 Biological Research 1-2 credits 

Course provides opportunity for student laboratory or theoretical research under staff 
supervision. Permission of the college dean is required. Laboratory fee. 

Prerequisites: 24 credits in Biology 

485 Special Topics 1-4 credits 

Topic may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration 
information and course hours. 

On demand 



78 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



487 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

Prerequisite: 24 credits in Biology 

490 Coordinating Seminar 1 credit 

An introduction to the literature of biology. Topics discussed vary according to the needs 
and interests of the students. 

Prerequisites: 24 credits in Biology. Fall only 



Business Administration Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree, Four-year Track BS, Business Administration, Five-year Track BS, Business 

Administration and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 



Students who major in business administration choose to focus on a specific area of business. 
The business administration major allows students to choose a minor sequence in areas such 
as management, accounting, marketing, or management information systems. The major 
requires all students to take at least 12 required courses, at least 15 credits in the minor 
sequence, and 18 credits in free electives. Majors must complete the 48-credit university core 
as required by all students. 

The business administration major permits students to freely fashion their studies to meet their 
professional and personal needs. The curriculum contains sufficient flexibility to meet most 
needs and expectations of students, both those who intend to go on to graduate school and 
those who seek immediate entrance into the profession. Students in the major need to work 
very closely with their advisor in the selection of courses. While business administration 
majors may choose a minor sequence in marketing or management, they may not declare a 
marketing or management minor. Marketing, management, accounting and information 
technology majors cannot choose business administration as a second major. 

The major permits students to take an aggressively quantitative or qualitative track or an equal 
balance between the "management by numbers" position and the "management through 
people" concept. Students are given instruction in business writing and presentation skills. 

Business Administration Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 3 




Core 3 




Core 3 




Core 3 




Core 3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 3 


BUS 107 


Essential 3 




Technology 




Communications 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 3 


BUS 269 


Principles of Marketing 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 79 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester 

Core 
Core 

BUS 207 Contempi 

ACC101 Principles 
Elective 



r otal Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


3 




Core 3 


3 




Core 3 


conomics 3 




Sequence Course 3 


counting 3 


MIS 110 


Introduction to 3 


3 




Information Systems 

Elective 3 



Junior Year 

First Semester 
Core 
Core 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 



BUS 352 



Sequence Course 
Business Law 
Elective 



Senior Year 

First Semester 
Core 



BUS 371 
BUS 415 



Total Credits 15 
3 

Free elective 3 

Sequence Course 3 

Finance 3 

International Business 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Sequence Course 3 

Elective 3 

BUS 360 Management of Human 3 
Resources 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 

Sequence Course 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Business Administration and 
MBA, see MBA program description. 



Business Administration Major Sequence 
With a sequence (choose five from one area) 

Management Courses 

BUS 205 Macroeconomics 

BUS 206 Microeconomics 

BUS 307 Management Science 

BUS 350 Money and Banking 

BUS 406 Current Issues and Trends in Business 

BUS 420 Small Business Management 

BUS 465 Special Topics in Business 

BUS 472 Business Administration Internship 

BUS 491 Seminar in Business Policies (required) 

ACC 31 1 Managerial Accounting 



80 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Marketing Courses 

Sales and Sales Management 
Product/Service Marketing 
Advertising and Sales Promotion 
Channel Strategies 
Pricing Strategies 
Strategic Marketing (required) 
Special Topics in Marketing 
Marketing Research 



Cost Accounting 

Intermediate Accounting I 

Intermediate Accounting II 

Intermediate Accounting III 

Taxes I 

Taxes II 

Auditing 

Advanced Financial Accounting 

Accounting Internship (required) 

Independent Study 

Special Topics in Accounting 



Programming I 

Programming II 

Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation 

Applied Networking Design 

Introduction to Computer Systems 

Introduction to File Processing 

Data Structures 

Managerial Applications of Object-Oriented Programming I 

Software Engineering 

Teleprocessing 

Data Base Management Systems Design 

Information Technology Management (required) 

Select Specialization 

The select specialization is available only to transfer students with a minimum of 15 completed 
credit hours (grade of "C" or better) in a business-related field not offered at Misericordia 
University. Students with credits in a business-related field not offered at Misericordia 
University may apply those credits as a sequence in the business administration major. 



BUS 304 


BUS 321 


BUS 340 


BUS 401 


BUS 402 


BUS 403 


BUS 421 


BUS 450 


Accounting Cour, 


ACC310 


ACC 340 


ACC 341 


ACC 342 


ACC 401 


ACC 402 


ACC 410 


ACC 440 


ACC 472 


ACC 480 


ACC 485 


MIS Courses 


MIS 101 


MIS 121 


MIS 200 


MIS 220 


MIS 221 


MIS 231 


MIS 232 


MIS 310 


MIS 312 


MIS 420 


MIS 432 


MIS 491 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 8 1 



General Business Course Descriptions (BUS) 

105 Basic Computer Technology 3 credits 

This course covers the use of technology necessary to succeed in current society. The 
student gains an understanding of computer hardware and experience in the use of 
typical software. 

107 Essential Communication for Leaders 3 credits 

This comprehensive course focuses on communication theory, techniques, and 
applications essential within the organization today. A wide variety of verbal, nonverbal, 
and writing tools are presented in a "hands-on" fashion that emphasizes traditional 
principles as well as state-of-the-art technology. Business effectiveness and ethics 
principles are worked on throughout the course topics. 

205 Macroeconomics 3 credits 
An introduction to the science of economics, with particular attention to scarcity, market 
mechanisms of supply and demand, unemployment, inflation, money, banking, Federal 
Reserve, government, and the application of fiscal and monetary policy to solve current 
economic problems. 

206 Microeconomics 3 credits 
Topics covered include supply and demand, elasticity, consumer behavior, costs of 
production, and the market structures of competition, monopoly, monopolistic 
competition, and oligopoly. 

207 Contemporary Economics 3 credits 
This course will include coverage of the nature and scope of economics, scarcity and 
choice, the U.S. economic system, the role of supply and demand, production, cost and 
profit, perfect and imperfect competition, money in the U.S. economy, the Federal 
Reserve and the money supply, measuring output and income in the U.S., 
macroeconomic models/analysis, employment, income distribution, business cycles, 
microeconomic policies, national debt, and international trade. 

208 Principles of Management 3 credits 
The basic principles of management are studied with an emphasis on planning, 
organizing, leading, and controlling. The nature of the managerial process within the 
formal and informal structure are also studied. 

269 Principles of Marketing 3 credits 

A general overview of the basic marketing philosophies, principles and practices relevant 
to small and large profit and nonprofit organizations, buyers and sellers, and special 
emphasis on the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and distribution. 

Prerequisite: BUS 105 or equivalent 

304 Sales and Sales Management 3 credits 

This course is oriented to the managerial and the strategic aspects of sales 
management. Emphasis will be placed upon recruitment of the sales force, 
compensation policies, effective territorial alignments, time management, and financial 
responsibilities. Interpersonal selling techniques are explored and discussed. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 



82 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



306 Organizational Behavior 3 credits 
This course studies behavior patterns and motivational dynamics of different types of 
organizations and focuses on the leadership skills and interpersonal relationships 
necessary to achieve organizational goals while developing human potential. Topics 
include micro and macro models of organizational behavior applied to the management 
of organizational processes and design, motivation, leadership, structural design, and 
workforce diversity. 

Prerequisite: BUS 208 

307 Management Science 3 credits 
This course provides students with a solid conceptual understanding of the role that 
management science plays in the decision-making process. This course also introduces 
students to procedures used to solve problems, such as the decision-making process, 
linear programming, transportation, assignment, transshipment, project scheduling, 
waiting line models, simple linear regression, and multiple linear regression. 

Prerequisites: BUS 105 or permission of instructor, MTH 115 

309 Retail Buying for Fun 3 credits 

A study of foundation knowledge of the current policies and procedures used in retail 
buying and merchandising. Included are merchandise control, pricing, and merchandise 
arithmetic. The focus is on developing the skills necessary for decision making in a retail 
buyers' day-to-day world of planning and control. Discussion includes assortment 
planning and quantitative merchandising. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 (On demand) 

312 Retailing 3 credits 

This course provides a basic foundation of the retail industry and a complete 
presentation of the many and diverse facets that make up the dynamic world of retailing. 
Areas that are discussed include retail institutions, human factors in retailing, the 
importance of location, merchandise management, and promotion. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269: (On demand) 

321 Product/Service Marketing 3 credits 

This course provides an overview of key issues in the marketing of products and 
services. It guides the student to reassess the four P's of marketing in the context of 
products and services. Utilizing a case approach, this course examines how the 
marketing of services differs from that of products. Other marketable entities, like 
organizations, persons, places, and ideas, are included. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 

335 Retail Buying 3 credits 

A study of foundation knowledge of the current policies and procedures used in retail 
buying and merchandising. Included are merchandise control, pricing, and merchandise 
arithmetic. The focus is on developing the skills necessary for decision making in a retail 
buyers' day-to-day world of planning and control. Discussion includes assortment 
planning and quantitative merchandising. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 (On demand) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 83 



340 Advertising and Sales Promotion 3 credits 

A comprehensive study of the theory and practical applications of advertising and sales 
promotions as forms of communication in marketing. The student gains an 
understanding of strategic planning, objective setting, tactical decision making, research, 
message and vehicle selection and execution. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 

345 Consumer Behavior 3 credits 

A study of the dynamics of consumer markets and their significance to marketing 
executives. Subtopics include the identification and measurement of market segments, 
the analysis of these segments' behavioral patterns in regards to shopping and 
purchasing, and the application of this knowledge in developing marketing strategy. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 (On demand) 

350 Money and Banking 3 credits 

A study of the principles of money, interest, inflationary and deflationary pressures, and 
the development of the banking system with emphasis on the federal reserve system, 
and monetary and fiscal policy. 

Prerequisite: BUS 207 or BUS 205 

352 Business Law 3 credits 

Through law, society establishes values and goals. The purpose of American business 
law is to bring reason, fairness, and stability to the marketplace. This course enables 
students to anticipate the legal consequences of business decisions and behaviors. 

360 Management of Human Resources 3 credits 

A study of the role of work in our society and its effect on organizations including the 
nature of personnel management, the legal influences on personnel decisions, 
recruitment, selection, training, compensation, service and benefit programs, and the 
major problems and recent developments in labor relations 

Prerequisite: BUS 208 

371 Business Financial Management 3 credits 

A study of the financial problems associated with the life cycle of a business. Includes 
estimating the financial needs of an enterprise, breakeven point, operating leverage, 
capital structure, stocks and bonds, and working capital management. 

Prerequisite: ACC 101 

401 Channel Strategies 3 credits 

This course focuses on how to design, develop, and maintain effective relationships 
among channel members, including retailers and wholesalers. Students learn the 
logistics of distribution and the economics of channel decisions. Channel management 
policies and constraints are discussed. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 



84 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



402 Pricing Strategies 3 credits 
This practical course provides a comprehensive, managerially focused guide to 
formulating pricing strategy. It is a guide to profitable decision making and provides a 
basis for analyzing pricing alternatives. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 

403 Strategic Marketing 3 credits 
Strategic marketing examines the concepts and processes for gaining a competitive 
advantage in the marketplace. This capstone course presents a series of problem cases 
of actual firms, and focuses on helping students gain an appreciation for decision making 
in real-world situations. 

Prerequisite: All required marketing courses 

406 Current Issues and Trends in Business 3 credits 

This course looks at emerging paradigms and administrative issues that face today's 
managers. Students are exposed to a variety of topics. 

Prerequisite: Senior status or permission of instructor 

415 International Business 3 credits 

The intent of this course is to provide a blend of solid research-based information 
coupled with real world, current, interesting application examples that help explain 
international business topics. An active learning approach is used in relating text material 
with real world international situations. The topics include the perspective and 
environment of international business, the human resource management functions, as 
well as the strategies and functions of international operations. 

Prerequisites: BUS 208 

420 Small Business Management 3 credits 
Focuses on management practices unique to small businesses, preparation of the 
student for small business ownership, identifying characteristics of small businesses, 
and describing the rewards and problems involved in managing retail stores, service 
firms, and manufacturing firms. 

Prerequisites: BUS 208, BUS 269, BUS 371, ACC 101 or permission of instructor 

421 Special Topics in Marketing 3 credits 
An opportunity for students to explore nontraditional marketing phenomena. Great 
societal marketing opportunities exist in organizations other than business firms. Special 
areas of marketing that need attention include nonprofit, health care, education, ideas, 
places, political candidates, service, and international marketing. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 or consent of instructor 

440 Marketing Management 3 credits 

A comprehensive study of the management function in marketing. Focus is on analysis, 
planning, and control of the marketing mix. Decision-making skills are developed through 
the use of a computer simulation, the case study approach, or through the development 
of a marketing plan. In either scenario, students are required to demonstrate decision- 
making skills on product, price, placement, and promotions, as well as market 
segmentation. 

Prerequisites: ACC 101, BUS 208, BUS 269 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 85 



450 Marketing Research 3 credits 

A comprehensive and practical overview of the field of marketing research emphasizing 
an applied approach with applications that give students an understanding of the scope 
of marketing research. Computers are utilized to analyze research data. 

Prerequisite: BUS 269 

465 Special Topics in Business 1-6 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and are announced with preregistration 
information. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

472 Business Administration Internship 1-6 credits 

On-the-job training in the business community. Students must have senior status, a GPA 
of 2.5 or above, and college dean approval to participate. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation, with the assistance of a faculty member, of a selected topic of 
interest. A GPA of 3.0 or above, department chair/program director, and college dean 
approval is required. 

491 Seminar in Business Policies 3 credits 

The case-method technique is used to study managerial problems and the decision- 
making process. Areas covered include strategic planning, setting goals and objectives, 
marketing, managing, production, public relations, human resources, human relations, 
and financial management. Computer simulations are used to involve students in 
decision making in the various areas of the business firm. Graduating seniors and 
qualified juniors only. 

Prerequisites: ACC 101. BUS 105. BUS 207, BUS 208. BUS 269. BUS 352. BUS 
371. BUS 306 



Chemistry Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BS, Chemistry 

Department Chair Charles Saladino, Jr., PhD 

Faculty 

Anna Fedor, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, BS Pennsylvania State University; PhD Syracuse 
University 

Xuegang Jia, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, BS, MS Harbin Institute of Technology, PhD 
Southern Illinois University 

Larry Pedersen, Professor of Chemistry, BS Clarkson College of Technology; MS, PhD Yale 
University 

Charles Saladino, Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry, BA, MA Hofstra University; PhD Iowa 
State University 

Chemistry has been called the "central science" because it has applications in so many fields. 
Graduates with a major in chemistry can select from a variety of jobs in the chemical industry, 
in government laboratories, or in medical or agricultural research. In addition, they are 
prepared for graduate studies in chemistry or biochemistry and, with the proper selection of 
elective courses, for professional studies in medicine, veterinary medicine, and related fields. 



86 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



At the end of their sophomore year and thereafter, chemistry majors must have and maintain a 
GPA of 2.5 in courses required for the major in order to remain in good standing in the 
program, and a GPA of 3.0 to be recommended for graduate or professional schools. Students 
must earn three credits doing either a summer Internship during their junior year [CHM 490] or 
by taking research [CHM 460] in (or before) the first semester of their senior year. 

Chemistry BS Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


CHM 133 


Chemical Principles 


4 


CHM 134 


Chemical Principles II 4 


MTH 151 


Analytic Geometry & 
Calculus I 


3 


MTH 152 


Analytic Geometry & 3 
Calculus II 


HIS 


History Core 


3 


HIS 


History Core 3 


ENG 


Literature Core 


3 


ENG 


Literature Core 3 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 


3 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PHY 221 Physics I 4 

MTH 225 Analytic Geometry & 4 

Calculus III 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 

Junior Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PHY 222 Physics II 4 

MTH 242 Differential Equations 3 

MTH 115 Statistics 3 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 14 


CHM 355 


Physical Chemistry I 


4 


CHM 356 


Physical Chemistry II 4 


CHM 350 


Chemical Literature 


1 


CHM411 


Instrumental Analysis 3 


CHM 264 


Inorganic Quantitative 


5 


CHM 412 


Instrumental Lab I 1 




Analysis 




FA 


Fine Arts Core 3 


CPS 101 


Introduction To 
Programming 


3 




CPSSS Core 3 




CPSSS Core 


3 


Summer Elective Total Credits 3 








CHM 490 


Chemistry Internship* 3 


Senior Year 









First Semes 


iter Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15-16 


CHM 410 


Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry 


3 


CHM 


Chemistry Elective 3/4 
Free Elective 3 


CHM 413 


Instrumental Lab II 


1 




Free Elective 3 


CHM 475 


Chemistry Seminar 


1 




Free Elective 3 


CHM 353 


Biochemistry I 


3 


RLS 


Religious Studies Core 3 


CHM 363 


Biochemistry Laboratory 


1 


Total required for graduation 122 credits 


CHM 460 


Research* 


3 






RLS 


Religious Studies Core 


3 







Bachelor's Degree Programs 87 



Chemistry Course Descriptions (CHM) 

101 Chemistry in Context I 4 credits 
Offered for non-science major to satisfy the natural science core requirement. The 
course introduces the science of chemistry in the context of real world problems. 
Sufficient chemistry background is introduced to enable the student to develop an 
understanding of problems like global warming, air pollution, water quality and 
acid rain and possible alternatives for dealing with them. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 
hours 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry is recommended. Fall only 

102 Chemistry in Context II 

Offered for non-science majors to satisfy the natural science core requirement. The 
course continues to introduce the science of chemistry in the context of real world 
problems such as alternate energy sources, nuclear energy, plastics and polymers, 
pharmaceuticals, food and genetic engineering. Lecture: 3 hours Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 101. Spring only 

104 General Chemistry 4 credits 

This course is intended for students majoring in physical therapy, nursing or another 
health science. Principles of atomic theory, stoichiometry, chemical reactivity, gas and 
solution behavior, and nuclear chemistry. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission of instructor Fall and Summer only 

133 Chemical Principles I 4 credits 
Comprehensive study of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. The study of 
atomic structure, ionic and molecular compounds and their reactions, including 
stoichiometry, and an introduction to thermodynamics. Principles and techniques of 
systematic qualitative analysis and an introduction to quantitative laboratory procedures. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: High school chemistry or permission of instructor. Fall only 

134 Chemical Principles II 4 credits 
Continuation of the comprehensive study of the fundamental laws and theories of 
chemistry. The study of the physical states of matter, solutions, kinetics, equilibria, acids 
and bases, thermo-dynamics and electrochemistry. Further hands-on laboratory 
experience illustrating chemical theory and qualitative and quantitative analysis. Lecture: 
3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 133. Spring only 

210 Descriptive Chemistry 3 credits 

Discussion and study of elements and their compounds, emphasizing the relationship 
between the periodic table, chemical and physical properties, and commercial and 
industrial applications. The study will also include organic compounds and polymers. 
Lecture: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 243. Spring only 

* Students are required to take a minimum of three credits of either CHM 490 or CHM 
460 for graduation. 



88 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



243 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits 
Properties, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis of the major classes of carbon 
compounds. The concepts of chemical structure and functional group will serve as a 
basis for understanding organic reaction mechanisms and organic synthesis. Laboratory 
preparation and analysis of a variety of organic compounds. Lecture: 3 hours. 
Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 134. Fall only 

244 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits 
A continuation of the properties, reactions, and spectroscopic analysis of the major 
classes of carbon compounds. The concepts of chemical structure and functional group 
will serve as a basis for understanding organic reaction mechanisms and organic 
synthesis. Laboratory preparation and analysis of a variety of organic compounds. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 243. Spring only 

264 Inorganic Quantitative Analysis 5 credits 

Theory and laboratory procedures in typical volumetric, colorimetric, and gravimetric 
analysis. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 6 hours 

Prerequisite: CHM 134. Fall only 

343 Introduction to Physical Chemistry 4 credits 

States and structure of matter; thermodynamics; and thermochemistry. Lecture: 2 hours. 
Laboratory: 4 hours. 

Prerequisites: CHM 244, PHY 222, MTH 152. Alternate years 

350 Chemical Literature 1 credit 

Introduces the chemical literature and introduces library/online searching skills. 
Examines the structure of various types of scientific articles and develops the ability to 
critically analyze a peer-reviewed journal article. Lecture: 1 hour. 

Prerequisite: CHM 244. Fall only 

353 Biochemistry I 3 credits 

The study of basic chemical and physical principles in living systems, bioenergetics, 
enzyme kinetics, and the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids/proteins and 
nucleic acids. Lecture: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 244; Concurrent registration for CHM 363 is required for 
Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors. Fall only 

354 Biochemistry II 3 credits 
An in-depth study of the principles and mechanisms underlying bioenergetics, and the 
integration and hormonal control of the major metabolic pathways. Other topics include 
the metabolism of fasting/eating, stress, diabetes and alcoholism, free radicals and 
antioxidants, DNA repair, biochemistry of apoptosis, receptors and transsignaling, 
lipoprotein/platelet metabolism and cardiovascular risk, and various aspects of clinical 
chemistry. 

Prerequisite: CHM 353. Spring only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 89 



355 Physical Chemistry I 4 credits 
Properties and structure of gases, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase 
equilibrium, solutions, electrochemistry. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours 

Prerequisites: MTH 242, PHY 222. Fall only 

356 Physical Chemistry II 4 credits 
Structure of matter, quantum theory, bonding, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, 
kinetics. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 355. Spring only 

363 Biochemistry Laboratory 1 credit 

Investigation of the major laboratory techniques used in the study of the physical, 
chemical, and catalytic properties of biological molecules. Topics include protein 
chromatography, protein and nucleic acid electrophoreis, enzyme catalysis, PCR, and 
DNA sequencing. Laboratory: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite/corequisite: CHM 353. Fall only 

410 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits 
A comprehensive study of the current theories of bonding and structure within inorganic 
compounds. The study of transition metal chemistry, their complexes, and the 
organometalic chemistry of main group elements and transition metals. Lecture: 3 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 356 

41 1 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 3 credits 
Theory and techniques in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, chromatography, and other 
selected methods of chemical analysis. Lecture: 3 hours 

Prerequisites/corequisite: CHM 244, PHY 222, CHM 412. Spring only 

105 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits 

This course is intended for students majoring in physical therapy, nursing or another 
health science. Survey of carbon compounds and functional groups with an emphasis on 
those of biological significance. Introduction to the structures of biomolecules and the 
relationship between their structure and function within the body. Lecture: 3 hours. 
Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 104. Spring and Summer only 

412 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory I 1 credit 
A practical introduction to chemical instrumentation and methods of analysis. The 
practice of chromatography, electrochemistry, and other selected methods for chemical 
analysis will be investigated through laboratory exercises. Laboratory: 3 hours 

Prerequisites/corequisite: CHM 244, PHY 222; CHM 411. Spring only 

413 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory II 1 credit 
A continuation of Instrumental Analysis Laboratory I (CHEM 412). Laboratory projects 
involving a variety of analytical techniques with an emphasis on spectroscopy and real 
sample analysis. Laboratory: 3 hours 

Prerequisites: CHM 244, PHY 222, CHM 411, CHM 412. Fall only 
90 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



420 Polymer Chemistry 3 credits 

An introduction to the synthesis, properties, and characterization of polymers. The 
course will cover both addition and condensation polymers, catalysis, and modern 
methods and instrumentation for the characterization of macromolecules. 

Prerequisite: CHM 244 

450 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

Topic may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration 
information and course hours. Students will acquire expertise in a specialized field of 
chemistry. The precise field of chemistry offered will depend on the requests from 
students and availability of a qualified faculty member to teach the course. 

456 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 credits 

Characterization of organic compounds using classical wet chemical methods and 
spectroscopic analysis, especially NMR and IR. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 6 hours. 

Prerequisite: CHM 244 

460 Research in Chemistry 1-3 credits 

Chemical research under the direction of a faculty member of the chemistry department. 
Students are expected to perform a minimum of three hours of laboratory studies per 
week per credit hour. The student may register for fewer than three credits with 
permission of the research director, as long as a total of three credits of research are 
completed prior to graduation. If the student desires, research in chemistry may be taken 
as an elective up to a maximum of six credits. 

Prerequisite: CHM 244 

475 Seminar 1 credit each semester 

Current topics. Each student will prepare and present a seminar on a topic from the 
recent chemical literature or on their own research project. Lecture: 1 hour 

Prerequisite: CHM 244, CHM 356 

490 Chemistry Internship 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in an industrial or academic lab. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing or approval of Chemistry faculty. Summer only 



Clinical Laboratory Science Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BS, Clinical Laboratory Science 

For information contact Anthony Serino, PhD 

Clinical laboratory science (CLS) (formerly Medical Technology) major offers, through its 
affiliation with hospital schools, the opportunity to complete the requirements for a bachelor of 
science degree in four years with a clinical year rotation at an accredited hospital school. CLS 
majors complete three years in a biology-based curriculum on campus, and then apply for 
acceptance to an affiliated hospital program at the end of their fourth semester. Admission to a 
hospital school program is not guaranteed, but Misericordia University maintains a very high 
success rate. Following the hospital program, the student is eligible to sit for the certification 
examinations offered by the Board of Registry of Clinical Laboratory Scientists (or Medical 
Technologists) and the National Accrediting Agency for Medical Laboratory Personnel. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 9 1 



Clinical Laboratory Science BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


CHM 133 


Chemical Principles I 4 




Core 3 


BIO 101 


Gen. Botany, Biological 4 




Princ. 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 3 


FA 102 


Cult Syn in Ancient World 3 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy 4 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry I 4 

PHL101 Contemporary Self. 3 

Images 

PSY123 Introduction to 3 

Psychology 

Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

CHM 134 Chemical Principles II 4 

Core 3 

BIO 102 General Zoology 4 

Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 252 Histology 4 

CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 4 

SOC101 or ECO 207 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Junior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 

CHM 353 Biochemistry 



ENG 



MTH 115 



Core 

Free elective 
Statistics 
Free elective 



5 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


3 


BIO 243 


General Microbiology 4 


3 




Free elective 3 


3 




Core 3 


3 


BIO 360 


Immunology 1 


3 


BIO 346 


General Physiology 4 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

CLS 400 Clinical Microbiology 8 

CLS 401 Clinical Chemistry 7 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

CLS 402 Clinical Hematology/ 5 



CLS 405 


Coagulation 

Clinical Seminar 2 


CLS 403 


Clinical 4 




Immunohematology 


CLS 404 


Clinical Immunology/ 4 




Serology 


Total required for graduation 126 credits 



92 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Clinical Laboratory Science Associates 

Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Program Director Nadine F. Gladfelter, MT (ASCP) 
Medical Director James Eastman, MD 

The Williamsport Hospital Campus, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 
Program Director Loretta Moffatt 
Medical Director William Lubbe, MD 

Robert Packer Hospital, Sayre, Pennsylvania 
Program Director Brian Spezialetti, MS, MT (ASCP) 
Medical Director Joseph King, MD 

Clinical Laboratory Science Course Descriptions (CLS) 

400 Clinical Microbiology 8 credits 
Identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. Techniques 
to isolate, stain, and culture, and to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. 
Instrumentation; quality control. 

Fall only 

401 Clinical Chemistry 7 credits 

Enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, 
metabolism of nitrogenous end products, physiology and metabolism of fluids and 
electrolytes, and toxicology as related to the body and diseases. The technical 
procedures include colorimetry, spectrophometry electrophoresis, chromatography, 
automation, and quality control. 

Fall only 

402 Clinical Hematology/Coagulation 5 credits 
The composition and function of blood; diseases related to blood disorders; the role of 
platelets and coagulation. Manual and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for 
abnormalities. 

Spring only 

403 Clinical Immunohematology 4 credits 
Blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic 
tests. An in-depth study of blood donor service and its many facets such as transfusions, 
medico-legal aspects, etc. 

Spring only 

404 Clinical Immunology/Serology 4 credits 
Immune response, immunoglobulins, autoimmunity, and complement and related tests 
and diseases. Survey and demonstration of serological diagnostic tests. 

Spring only 

405 Clinical Seminar 2 credits 
Other courses which are not included in the above (such as orientation, laboratory 
management, education, clinical microscopy) and are unique to the individual hospital 
program. 

Spring only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 93 



480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 



Communications Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Degree BA, Communications 
Department Chair Richard Crew, PhD 
Faculty 

Richard Crew, Associate Professor, BA Michigan State University; MS Syracuse University; PhD 
Union Institute & University 

Dan Kimbrough, Visiting Assistant Professor, BS Manchester College, MS Central Michigan 
University 

Melissa Becker Sgroi, Assistant Professor, BA Kings College; MS Ed, Wilkes University 

The communications major prepares students for careers in such areas as advertising, public 
relations, journalism (print, broadcast, and electronic), video and audio production, and writing 
for print and electronic media. Emphasis is on developing good writing and speaking skills, 
acquiring professional-level experience across several media platforms, and nurturing 
aesthetic awareness and creativity. 

Majors complete 48 credits in communications and six credits of additional English-related 
coursework. Required communications courses include human communication media criticism, 
video production I, Journalism I, and senior seminar - all three credit courses. Majors also 
take three, one-credit practicum courses (supervised work in student radio, TV and 
newspaper) over their first two years, followed by one, three-credit campus media internship in 
junior year. As seniors, majors will complete a three-credit internship with a professional media 
organization. The practicum courses and internships provide valuable experiential learning as 
well as contacts with professionals in the media. The student selects the remaining credit 
hours in the major in consultation with his/her advisor. 

General Requirements 

Incoming first-year students seeking admission as communications majors must meet the 
general and specific requirements as stated in this catalog, including a 2.5 GPA in high school. 
Where a student does not fully meet those requirements, they may become a communications 
major whenever they achieve an overall university GPA of 2.0 or better. Continuation as a 
communications major requires that the student maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 or "C" 
average, both in the major and in the overall grade point average. 

Transfer students must complete all of the requirements listed in the sequence of required 
courses in this catalog. Approval for transfer credits in communications or approval of off- 
campus courses in communications rests with the program director. 



94 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Communications BA Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 5 

ENG Core 3 

HIS Core 3 

CPSSS Core 3 

MTH Mathematics Bank I 3 

COM 101 Human Communication 3 



Second Semester 

ENG 

HIS 

PHL 100 

MTH 

COM 220 

COM 173 



Total Credits 16 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Intro to Philosophy 3 

Mathematic Bank II 3 

Journalism I 3 

Practicum 1 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


FA 


Core 


3 


ENG 


Composition (COM 3 


SCI 


Science Core 


3 




Cognate) 


PHL 


Core 


3 


SCI 


Science Core 3 


COM 232 


Video I Production 


3 


CPSSS 


Core 3 


COM 215 


Web Design & Production 


3 


COM 


Elective 3 


COM 272 


Practicum 


1 


COM 
COM 273 


Elective 3 
Practicum 1 


Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


FA 


Core 


3 


RLS 


Core 3 


RLS 


Core 


3 


COM 


Elective 3 


COM 306 


Media Criticism 


3 


COM 


Elective 3 


COM 


Cognate (ENG) 


3 


COM 


Elective 3 


COM 370 


Campus Media Intern 


3 




Free Elective 3 
Free Elective 3 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

COM 470 Internship 3 

COM Elective 3 



Elective 
Free Elective 
Free Elective 
Free Elective 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

COM 490 Senior Seminar 3 

COM Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Total required for graduation 123 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 95 



Communications Major - Public Relations & Advertising Specialization 

The specialization in public relations/advertising is a focused program of extended study within 
the communications degree program. This specialization is only available to communications 
majors. 

Communications BA Degree - Public Relations & Advertising Specialization 

Sequence of Required Courses 



First Year 












First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


ENG 


Core course 




3 


ENG 


Core course 3 


HIS 


Core course 




3 


HIS 


Core course 3 


Beh Sci 


Core course 




3 


PHL100 


Intro to Philosophy 3 


MTH 


Math Bank I 




3 


MTH 


Math Bank II 3 


COM 101 


Human Communication 


3 


COM 220 


Journalism I 3 










COM 173 


Practicum 1 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 6 

FA Core course 3 

SCIENCE Core course 

PHL Core course 

COM 232 Video I Production 

COM 21 5 Web Design & Prod 

COM 272 Practicum - Radio 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

ENG 103 Comp (COM Cognate) 3 



3 


SCIENCE 


Core course 


3 


3 


Beh Sci 


Core course 


3 


3 


COM 251 


P.R. Prin & Prac 


3 


3 


BUS 269 


Marketing 


3 


1 


COM 273 


Practicum -Video 


1 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

FA Core course 3 

RLS Core course 3 

BUS 340 Advertising 3 

COM 207 Media Writing 3 

COM 306 Media Criticism 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 


RLS 


Core course 3 


COM 310 


Print Design & 3 




Production 


COM 


Specialization Elective 3 


COM 370 


Campus Media 3 




Internship 




Free Elective 3 



Senior Year 






First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


COM Cognate (ENG) 


3 


COM Specialization Elective 3 


COM 460 Integ Com Campaign 


3 


COM 490 Senior Seminar 3 


COM 470 Professional Internship 


3 


Free elective 3 


Free elective 


3 


Free elective 3 


Free elective 


3 


Free elective 3 
Total required for graduation 123 credits 



96 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Communications Course Descriptions (COM) 

101 Human Communication 3 credits 

The process and theory of communication between two people, in groups, in leadership 
roles, in public communication and in mass communication. 

173/272/273 Practicum 1 credit 

Directed experiences during freshman and sophomore years working with student radio, 
TV, and newspaper. 

204 Film and Filmmakers 3 credits 

An introduction to the art, language, history and theory of film. Students will study films 
from the 1940's through the present. 

207 Media Writing 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing public relations materials, commercials and advertising 
copy. 

215 Web Design & Production 3 credits 

An introduction to web design principles and production techniques. This course features 
hands-on exploration of web design and communication theory. Subjects covered 
include HTML, interface, graphics, and multimedia. 

221 Journalism II 3 credits 

Introduction to copy editing and beat reporting; advanced study and practice in event 
coverage, research, and interviewing. 

Prerequisite: COM 220 

220 Journalism I 3 credits 

Introduction to basic news writing and reporting. Emphasis on developing a journalistic 
style, learning to cover events, and conducting interviews. 

225 Photojournalism 3 credits 

The basic elements of photojournalism including fundamentals of digital photography, 
composition, light and color, along with processing pictures using the Photoshop digital 
application. Also covered: privacy, libel law, ethics, and taste. 

232 Video Production I 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in electronic field production and electronic news gathering. 
Emphasizes field camera operation, location shooting, and editing of short video 
segments. 

233 Video Production II 3 credits 

Emphasis placed on pre-production, studio production, studio equipment operation, and 
non-linear post production. 

Prerequisites: COM 232 

240 Audio Production 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in the creation and duplication of audio tracks for radio, 
television and multi-media. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 97 



251 Public Relations Principles and Practices 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in the basics of public relations. 

Prerequisite: COM 220 or instructor permission 

306 Media Criticism 3 credits 
Analysis, evaluation and instruction in the critical process to evaluate media products 
and messages. The course will emphasize the difference between description, analysis, 
and opinion. 

Prerequisites: COM 101 plus nine additional credits in Communications 

307 Communication Research 3 credits 

This course will study and practice the various methodologies in communication 
research. 

Prerequisites: COM 101, Junior status 

310 Print Design and Production 3 credits 

An introduction to print design principles and production techniques. Areas covered 
include key design principles, fundamentals of professional-level typography, and page- 
layout software programs to create print publications. 

323 Broadcast Journalism 3 credits 

News reporting, writing, editing and production of news for the electronic media. 

Prerequisite: COM 220 and COM 232, or instructor permission 

325 Magazine and Feature Writing 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing long form pieces for newspapers and magazines. 

332 Video III 3 credits 

Advanced work in production emphasizing non-linear editing and long-form productions. 

Prerequisites: COM 232, COM 233, or instructor permission 

339 Media Performance 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in on-air performance techniques for television, video, and radio. 
Includes vocal enunciation and diction, interview preparation, and physical movement. 
Performance formats include: news, commercials, interviews, radio announcing, and 
vocal characterization. 

Prerequisites: COM 232 or instructor permission 

352 Advanced Public Relations 3 credits 

Case studies in public relations; experiences creating press kits and in event planning. 

Prerequisite: COM 251 

360 Media Management 3 credits 

Practices, problems and issues in managing a media outlet. 

Prerequisite: COM 101, Junior Status 



98 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



361 Media Programming 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in programming electronic media outlets using a framework of 
industry structures and public demand. 

Prequisite: COM 101 

370 Campus Media Internship 3 credits 

Supervised, hands-on media experience on the Misehcordia campus in radio, video, 
newspaper, or public relations. 

Junior status 

460 Integrated Communications Campaigns 3 credits 

Student teams organize and create communication campaigns by integrating 
advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct response and other integrated 
market communications tools. 

Prerequisite: Junior status 

470 Professional Internship 3 credits 

Directed experiences at a professional media outlet. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing and department permission 

480 Independent Study . 3 credits 

In-depth study of a specific topic, selected in consultation with a faculty member. 

Prerequisite: Department permission 

485 Special Topics 3 credits 

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced with pre-registration 
information. 

Prerequisite: Department permission 

490 Senior Seminar 3 credits 

Capstone course for the communications degree. Reading and study of mass media 
issues, exploration of media job options, and development of a senior media project. 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and COM 101, 220, 232, 306, 370, 470 



Computer Science Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BS, Computer Science 

For information contact Patricia Lapczynski, RSM, DPS 

Faculty 

Patricia Lapczynski, RSM, Associate Professor of Computer Science, BA Douglass College; MS 
Dartmouth College; DPS Pace University 

Several different computer science programs are available to respond to a variety of interests 
and career goals. The computer science curricula follows the recommendations of the 
Association of Computing Machinery and provides career-oriented education within a strong 
liberal arts program. The computer science major leads to a bachelor of science in computer 
science. The program prepares students to pursue careers in scientific or industrial 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 99 



programming and systems analysis, or to continue their education at the graduate level. 
Students have ample access to computer labs stocked with IBM PC compatibles. All facets of 
hardware and software are continually upgraded to ensure that students work with the most 
recent components of this dynamic technology. 

In addition, a double major of computer science and mathematics is available by completing 
five additional approved mathematics courses. Contact the math department chair for details. 

Mission 

To provide a cooperative and quality academic environment in which students can graduate 
with an undergraduate liberal arts based degree in computer science and in which faculty are 
enabled to develop professionally. 

Program Objectives 

A student who graduates with a degree in computer science can: 

• think critically 

• reason logically and analytically 

• solve abstract and complex problems 

• use written, oral and electronic methods for effective communication 

• translate verbal material to computer algorithms 

• write a well-organized theme 

• complete assigned work 

• use the scientific method and mathematical techniques to make informed choices 
among alternative solutions 

• discern and articulate the impact of technologies on society 

• understand structured and object-oriented programming techniques 

• understand database methodology, operating systems, software, and hardware 
Admission Requirement 

Students should have one year of high school biological science and one year of high school 
physical science. Students should also have taken sufficient mathematics courses to 
successfully pass Math 151, 152 and 225. 

Retention Criteria 

Students should have a minimum average GPA of 2.0 in their major courses. 

Upper-ievel courses are offered in alternate years, so that a student's schedule may not follow 
this sequence exactly. For example, courses that are shown in the senior year may be taken in 
the junior year and vice versa. 

Computer Science BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 5 Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

CPS 101 Introduction to Programming 3 CPS 121 Computer Programming 3 

MTH151 Calculus I 3 MTH 152 Calculus II 3 

Core 3 Core 3 



3 


MTH 152 


Calculus 


3 




Core 


3 




Core 


3 




Core 



Core 3 Core 3 

Core 3 Core 3 



1 00 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 13 


PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 


PHY 222 


General Physics II 4 


MTH 225 


Calculus III 


4 




Core 3 


MTH 244 


Set Theory and Logic 


3 


CPS 222 


Computer Organization 3 




Free elective 


3 


CPS 485 


Special Topics 3 


CPS221 


Introduction to Computer 
Systems 


3 






Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


MTH 241 


Linear Algebra 


3 


CPS 232 


Data Structures 3 




Core 


3 


CPS 


Free elective 3 


CPS 321 


Operating Systems, 
Architecture 


3 




Core 3 
Core 3 


CPS 231 


File Processing 


3 


MTH 215 


Mathematics Statistics 3 


CPS 331 


Organization Program 
Lang. 


3 






Senior Year 









First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


CPS 480 


Independent Study 


3 


CPS 


Free elective 3 


CPS 


Free elective 


3 


CPS 


Free elective 3 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


CPS 431 


Software Design, 
Development 


3 


CPS 432 


Database Management 3 
Design 








Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Computer Science Course Descriptions (CPS) 

101 Introduction to Programming 3 credits 

Problem-solving methods; algorithm development; procedural and data abstraction; and 
program design, programming. Intended for students who plan to continue with other 
computer science courses. 

Fall only 

121 Computer Programming 3 credits 

Control structures, top-down programming and stepwise refinement. Debugging, testing, 
and documentation. 

Prerequisite: CPS 101 or knowledge of language used in CPS101 and permission of 
instructor. Spring only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 101 



130 Computing for Scientists 3 credits 

Computers are becoming an increasingly important aspect of the biological, physical and 
social sciences, whether we use them as part of an existing instrument, whether we're 
building new equipment, or whether we need to build new software. This course will link 
the use of various software packages and a programming language that assist the 
student with the analysis of their scientific data. Not for computer science majors 

Fall only 

221 Introduction to Computer Systems 3 credits 
Basic concepts of computer systems and computer architecture. Machine and assembly 
language programming. 

Prerequisite: CPS 121. 

222 Introduction to Computer Organization 3 credits 
Organization and structure of the major computer components; mechanics of information 
transfer and control within the digital computer system; fundamentals of logic design and 
computer arithmetic. 

Prerequisite: CPS 121. 

231 Introduction to File Processing 3 credits 

File terminology, structure, and manipulation techniques. Sequential and random access 
bulk storage devices. Applications of data structures and file processing techniques. 
Introduction to COBOL. 

Prerequisite: CPS 121. 

232 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis 3 credits 
Design and analysis of non-numeric algorithms, particularly for 
sorting/merging/searching. Algorithm testing and complexity. 

Prerequisite: CPS 231. 

321 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture 3 credits 

Organization and architecture of computer systems at the register-transfer and 
programming levels; operating systems principles; inter-relationship of the operating 
system and the architecture of computer systems. 

Prerequisites: CPS 221, CPS 222 (CPS 231 also recommended). 

331 Organization of Programming Languages 3 credits 

Features, limitations, organization, and run-time behavior of programming languages. 
Formal study of programming language syntax, grammar, and data and control 
structures. Examples of language implementations. Continued development of problem- 
solving and programming skills. 

Prerequisites: CPS 121 (CPS 221 and 231 strongly recommended). 

412 Computers and Society 3 credits 

Concepts of social value and valuations; the effects of computers on society; 
professional ethics in decisions concerning social impact; and tools and techniques used 
to solve problems related to social consequences of computers. 

Prerequisites: CPS 121 and one of either CPS 221, CPS 222, or CPS 231 
1 02 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



431 Software Design and Development 3 credits 
Design techniques, organization and management of large scale software development. 
Students work in programming teams on a major development project. Course is 
equated with MIS 200. 

Prerequisite: CPS 232 (CPS 331 strongly recommended). 

432 Database Management Systems Design 3 credits 
Introduction to database concepts, data models, data description languages, query 
facilities, file, and index organization. Data integrity, reliability, and security. Students 
work with real database management systems. 

Prerequisite: CPS 232. Spring only 

470 Computer Science Cooperative Education 1-3 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

Prerequisite: Approval of faculty 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

485 Special Topics in Computer Science 1-3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced with pre-registration 
information. 

Prerequisite: CPS 101 or consent of instructor 



English Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BA, English 

Department Chair Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

Faculty 

W. Scott Blanchard, Professor of English, BA Middlebury College; PhD Columbia University 

Corine Coniglio, Assistant Professor of English, BA King's College, MA Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania; PhD Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Patrick L. Hamilton, Assistant Professor of English, BA Portland State University; MA University of 
Arkansas; PhD University of Colorado 

Ruth Kelly, RSM, Professor Emeritus of English, BA College Misericordia; MA Villanova University 

Richard P. Lynch, Professor of English, BA St. Michael's College; MA, PhD Southern Illinois 
University 

Thomas P. Rechtin, Visiting Assistant Professor of English, BA De Pauw University, MFA 
Bennington College; PhD Binghamton University 

Allyson Samual, Assistant Professor of English, BA Long Island University; MA Long Island 
University; PhD Michigan State University 

Rebecca Steinberger, Associate Professor of English, BA Wilkes College; MA University of 
Scranton; PhD Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

The English curriculum emphasizes the development of critical reading and writing skills as an 
essential preparation for professional life or graduate school. Students in English most often 
seek careers in writing, editing, web design, journalism, law, or teaching at the high school or 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 03 



college level. The English major gives students the ability to adapt to different job markets and 
career changes. In addition to its focus on improving writing and analytical skills, the program 
ensures a familiarity with different critical approaches to literature and an understanding of 
different literary forms, movements, and periods, particularly in the literature of Ireland, Great 
Britain, and America. 

Departmental Goals for the English Major 
The program in English helps its major to: 

1 . Develop critical reading skills that will allow them to approach primary and secondary 
sources thoughtfully, independently, and with attention to detail. 

2. Develop writing skills that will make them competitive on the job market and prepare 
them for professional life or graduate school. 

3. Develop effective research and documentation skills, including the use and evaluation 
of Internet sources. 

4. Understand the development of the English language, its structure and basic 
elements, and linguistic theories that help to explain it. 

5. Develop discussion and oral presentation skills that will allow them to speak effectively 
in front of others. 

6. Acquire a thorough background in English and American literature, and appreciate the 
perspectives of non-Western literature and the literature of under-represented groups 
in Western society. 

7. Become familiar with different critical theories and approaches to literature. 

8. Understand the opportunities open to English majors, and behaviors that will assist 
them in finding employment or entering graduate school. 

Students may choose from two tracks: Literature or Professional Writing. 

The literature track provides students with a firm background in English and American 
literature, in addition to courses in a variety of areas of interest to the faculty, such as Russian 
literature, film and literature, the protest novel in America, and the literature of revolution. This 
track has the largest number of free electives and allows students to specialize in pre-law, 
obtain secondary education certification, or minor in any area of interest. The literature track 
also provides excellent preparation for those planning to go on to graduate school. 

The professional writing track is designed for those interested in careers in writing and related 
fields such as journalism, feature writing, magazine article writing, publishing, editing, 
technical writing, advertising, script writing for radio and television, screen writing for film, and 
other kinds of creative writing. It is also appropriate for students interested in teaching writing. 

The sequence of required courses below is for the literature track. Requirements for the 
professional writing track are as follows: 12 credits of advanced writing courses, including 
three credits of ENG 203 and nine credits selected from ENG 325, ENG 339, ENG 341 (may 
be taken twice, for up to six credits), ENG 343, and ENG 345; six credits of internship at local 
media outlets, PR offices, etc; 18 credits of advanced literature, including Shakespeare, at 
least four 300-level period courses, and at least one ENG 415; three credits of either ENG 420 
(Senior Seminar) or ENG 450 (Senior Thesis). Students in the Writing Track also have to meet 
the advanced history requirement. 

In unusual situations, the English department chair may approve changes in specific course 
requirements. Final approval for transfer credits in English or approval of off-campus courses 
in English rests with the English department chair. 



) 04 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Specializations 

English majors interested in the legal profession may specialize in pre-law. Misericordia 
University's pre-law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of 
American Law Schools, which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal 
arts background. The combination of English and pre-law makes an excellent preparation for 
the LSAT. See Pre-law specialization, page 107, for further information. 

The secondary education program in English prepares students to teach English at the junior- 
high and high-school level. In addition to providing the necessary knowledge base in language 
and literature, the program gives students the skills to identify and assist those with learning 
disabilities and to use technology effectively in the classroom. The program is fully approved 
by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a teaching certificate valid in 
Pennsylvania for grades 7 through 12 which is transferable to many other states. See 
Secondary Education Program in English, page 250, for further information. 

Internships 

English majors often do internships for credit during their junior and senior years at local 
media outlets and other businesses. These outlets include two daily newspapers, weekly 
newspapers, several local radio stations and public relations offices, and local TV affiliates for 
ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, and PBS. Internships are available for students in English/Pre-Law at 
local law offices and offices at the county courthouse. Student editors of Instress, the campus 
literary magazine, may register one time only for a total of three internship credits. Their work 
will be supervised and evaluated by the faculty advisor to the magazine. 

Generai Requirements 

Incoming first-year students seeking admission to the university as English majors must meet 
the general and specific admissions requirements of the university as stated in this catalog. 
When the student does not fully meet those requirements, a personal interview is required. 
Continuation as an English major requires that the student maintain a minimum 2.0 or "C" 
average, both in the major and in the overall grade point average. 

After transfer credits are applied, transfer students must complete all of the remaining English 
requirements as listed in the sequence of required courses in this catalog. 

Recommendations 

To receive a recommendation for graduate school or law school, students must maintain a 
minimum 3.0 or "B" average, both in the major and in the overall grade point average. 

English BA Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 5 Second Semester Total Credits 15 

ENG Core 3 ENG Core 3 

HIS Core 3 HIS Core 3 

PHL Core 3 PHL Core 3 

CPSSS Core 3 CPSSS Core 3 

MTH Mathematics Bank I 3 MTH Mathematics Bank II 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 105 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

FA Core 3 

SCI Core 3 

RLS Core 3 

ENG215 Shakespeare 3 
ENG 203 Advanced Expository or 

ENG 341 Imaginative Writing 3 



Secon 


d Semester Total Credits 15 


FA 


Core 3 


SCI 


Core 3 


RLS 


Core 3 


ENG 


300 Level Literature Course 3 




Free elective 3 



Junior Year 



First Semester 



Total Credits 



ENG 300 Level Literature 

Course 
HIS Advanced History 

ENG 318 Language Studies 
Free elective 
Free elective 



Second Semester 



Total Credits 15 



ENG 300 Level Literature Course 3 

ENG 300 Level Literature Course 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 



Senior Year 



First Semester 
ENG 



ENG 420 
ENG 450 
ENG 415 



300 Level Literature 

Course 

Senior Seminar or 

Senior Thesis 

Selected Studies 

Free elective 

Free elective 



Total Credits 15 
3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

ENG 415 Selected Studies 3 

HIS Advanced History 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



English, Pre-law 

College of Arts and Science 

Degree BA, English 

Department Chair Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

For information contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 

The Pre-law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of American 
Law Schools, which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts 
background. The program provides sound preparation for the Law School Admission Test 
(LSAT) and the graduate study of law. 

The program has been carefully designed to develop ability in expression and analytical 
comprehension, to afford basic information about human institutions and values, and to 
cultivate the ability to think creatively and critically with thoroughness and independence. 

Students may choose to major in English, history, philosophy, or interdisciplinary studies. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the major program requirements and the Pre-law program 
requirements, the student will earn a bachelor of arts degree in English, history, philosophy, or 
interdisciplinary studies with a Pre-law specialization. 



1 06 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Pre-law students must fulfill the general and specific requirements of the university and of the 
specific major as stated in the catalog for retention in the program and for recommendation to 
law school. 

Pre-law students should register at the pre-law director's office, where advice on course 
selection and information concerning the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and law schools 
can be obtained. 



English Pre-law BA Degree 

Suggested Course of Study, Pre-professional Curriculum 

First Year 



First Semester 



POL 100 American National 
Government 



Total Credits 3 
3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 103 Global Politics 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 251 Law Seminar I 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 252 Law Seminar II 3 



Junior Year 




First Semester Total Credits 3 


Second Semester Total Credits 3 


POL 405 American Constitutional 3 


POL 406 American Constitutional 3 


Law I 


Law II 


Senior Year 





First Semester Total Credits 6 

POL 450 Law Internship I 3 

BUS 352 Business Law 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 451 Law Internship II 3 

POL Free Elective 3 

The total required for graduation is 120 
credits. 



English Course Descriptions (ENG) 

101C Literature of Values: Ancient and Medieval Literary Texts 3 credits 

This course is a survey of major works selected from ancient Greek and Roman 
literature, and Western European literature of the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on the ways 
in which specific works reflect the cultural values and historical situations of the peoples 
who produced them. 

102M Literature of Discovery: Modern and Early Modern Literary Texts 3 credits 

This course includes readings in Western European literature from the Renaissance to 
the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which specific works reflect 
changing values and modern intellectual movements. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 107 



103 Composition 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing skills for college and professional life. 

104M Literature of Discovery: American Literature 3 credits 

This course includes readings in American literature from the first Europeans to the 20th 
century. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which specific works reflect changing values 
and modern intellectual movements. 

105 The Research Paper 3 credits 

Instruction and practice in writing research papers from the choice of a topic to 
completion of the final draft. Variable lecture/discussion and laboratory hours. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or two writing-intensive courses 

108G African American Literature 3 credits 

This course examines the major African American authors in America, how their texts 
reflect their sense of identity, and how these texts fit into larger frameworks of American 
literature. The course also investigates the cultural history behind these works and 
issues such as stereotyping. 

109G Modern World Literature 3 credits 

This course focuses on the literatures of modern cultures other than those of Western 
Europe or North America. Works and authors are discussed in relation to their native 
cultures and in relation to the ways in which the literature reveals cultural and historical 
assumptions different from our own. 

1 1 1 G Literature of American Immigrants 3 credits 

This course investigates the experiences of different ethnic groups in America. It 
considers both their introductory experiences to America and their experiences 
attempting to integrate into American culture. Finally, the course examines ways in which 
the idea of immigration has remained central to the American myth, while immigrants 
themselves have often remained marginalized. 

112 Speech Communication 3 credits 

A content- and performance-oriented course designed to teach the importance of speech 
communication in today's society. Basic principles of speech communication; application 
of principles through the creation of communication messages; giving and receiving 
constructive criticism; and avoiding communication breakdowns. 

120 Theatre Production 1 credit 

The preparation and presentation of productions including rehearsal, performance, stage 
management, scenery production, constructing properties, lighting, sound, costumes, 
programs, box office, publicity, etc. May be repeated for credit. 

Cross registration with FA 120 

203 Advanced Expository Writing 3 credits 

Advanced practice in writing clear prose using various modes of exposition, with an 
emphasis upon developing and improving style. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or two writing-intensive courses 



1 08 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



205 Beginning Acting 3 credits 

Analysis and experience of dramatic literature through performance. Emphasis is placed 
on building a basic performance vocabulary and technique, and developing confidence 
and critical thinking skills. 

Cross registration with FA 200 

215 Shakespeare 3 credits 

Introduces the student to Shakespeare through a careful reading and analysis of two or 
more genres of Shakespearean drama in seven or eight of the major plays. A number of 
approaches may be taken to the plays, such as their dramaturgy and structural 
composition, as well as the intellectual and social background of Shakespeare's age. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

220 Theatre in Performance 3 credits 

Examination of dramatic texts in performance and the history of dramatic production in a 
variety of cultures. Main focus is on Western traditions, but some Eastern traditions are 
included. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

300 Classics of Western Literature 3 credits 
A study of the major works that have influenced Western writers, with emphasis on the 
characteristics of different types of literature and cultural backgrounds. Readings include 
works by Homer, Dante, and Goethe. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

301 Teaching Writing 3 credits 
This course offers practice in writing short essays and in responding to the writing of 
others. Review of grammar and sentence construction is included as needed. 

302 Myth and Symbol 3 credits 
This course surveys texts that focus on a major literary symbol or myth across time and 
genre, and examines how these devices have provided continuity for authors from 
different centuries, and how they have changed in response to cultural changes. 
Examples include the underworld, the journey, the knight, and the machine. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101 C, ENG 102M 

318 The Study of Language 3 credits 

An introduction to the phonology, morphology, lexicon, and syntax of English. 
Approaches include both an overview of the development of English from the 
perspective of historical linguistics and an analysis of English from the perspective of 
structural linguistics. Topics covered include the IPA phonetic system, Indo-European 
roots of English, borrowings into English, traditional and transformational grammar, and 
dialect. 

320 19th Century American Literature 3 credits 

A survey of major 19th century American authors in the Romantic and Realist traditions, 
with special attention to cultural backgrounds. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101C, ENG 102M 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 09 



321 20th Century American Literature 3 credits 

A study of the major American novelists, poets, and dramatists of the 20th century. 
Emphasis will be on the realistic/naturalistic school and on cultural backgrounds that 
influenced American writers. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101C, ENG 102M 

325 Feature and Magazine Writing 3 credits 

Practice in writing longer articles suitable for both newspaper and magazine publishing. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or two writing-intensive courses; cross-listed with COM 325 

339 Technical Writing 3 credits 

Technique and practice in writing basic technical reports. Guidelines for scientific 
reporting, memoranda, progress reports and formal documents. 

Prerequisites: Two writing-intensive courses or ENG 103 

341 Imaginative Writing 3-6 credits 

Practice and development of writing skills in poetry, fiction, and drama. The course will 
be conducted as a workshop. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or two writing-intensive courses 

343 Writing for Media 3 credits 

Basic communication technique with an emphasis on news values, reporting and 

writing. 

Prerequisite: ENG 103 or two writing-intensive courses 

345 Fiction Writing 

A workshop in the writing of short fiction. Students will analyze the techniques of story 
writers, write their own original stories, and take part in class critiques of drafts. 

Prerequisite: ENG 341 or permission of instructor 

347 17th Century Literature 3-6 credits 

Intensive study of one or more selected authors, genres or movements, including such 
topics as Cavalier and Metaphysical poetry, the Age of Milton, religious poetry and 
prose, and the epic. May be repeated once on a different topic. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

350 Medieval and Renaissance Literature 3-6 credits 
Intensive study of a number of authors from the late medieval and Renaissance periods 
in European literature. Topics for each offering will be specified in advance, but may 
include Renaissance humanism and the imitation of classical literary models, the 
development of the lyric, medieval and Renaissance traditions of allegory, or the literary 
expression of dissent in medieval and Renaissance literature. May be repeated once on 
a different topic. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

351 Restoration and 18th Century Literature 3 credits 
Intensive study of authors, genres, and movements between 1660 and 1800, including 
restoration drama, the mock-epic, satire, and the beginning of the novel. Literary works 



110 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



are discussed in the context of political events such as the Puritan Revolution and its 
aftermath, and social changes, especially the increasing importance of the middle class 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

352 19th Century British Literature 3 credits 
Intensive study of the literature of the Romantic and Victorian periods. Emphasis is 
placed on the historical and cultural contexts of the French and Industrial Revolutions, 
and their influence on major Romantic poets and Victorian poets and novelists. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

353 20th Century British Literature 3 credits 
Intensive study of selected 20th century authors and movements. Covers major 
modernist figures such as Eliot and Joyce, and relates them to changes in 20th-century 
society. Also covers postmodernism in poetry and fiction. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

354 Russian Literature 3 credits 
A survey of the most important Russian writers of narrative poetry and fiction in the 19th 
century, from about 1825 to 1905. Emphasis will be placed on ways in which the 
literature reflects both European literary influence and specifically Russian history, 
culture and ideas. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

362 Fairy and Folk Tales 3 credits 

An examination of the development of fairy and folk tales from the Italian Renaissance 
through the literary fairy tale of late 17th century France to 19th and 20th century 
examples of the genre. Emphasis will be placed on the cultural circumstances that 
produced the tales and the consequent views of their function in society. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

415 Selected Studies in Literature 3-9 credits 

Intensive study of a specific author, period, genre, literary circle, or topic. Topics vary 
quite broadly and frequently contain interdisciplinary components; students may also 
request areas for study. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 

420 Senior Seminar 3 credits 

Students engage in a semester-long research project while also acquiring some 
knowledge of advanced literary criticism and critical theory. Texts will vary depending on 
instructor. Must be taken if ENG 450 (Senior Thesis) is not chosen. 

Prerequisite: Senior English major status 

450 Senior Thesis 3 credits 

Students will write an independently chosen thesis under the careful supervision of a 
faculty mentor. Students will master all phases of the research process, including the 
gathering of research from traditional and electronic bibliographical sources, standard 
systems of bibliographical citation, and organization of a developed and original 
argument. 

Prerequisites: Senior English Major status. Fall only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 111 



470 



480 



Internship 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community at newspapers, radio 
and TV stations, public relations offices, and other media outlets requiring good 
communication skills. 



Prerequisites: ENG 103, 203, or three writing-intensive courses 

Independent Study 

Special investigation of a selected literary topic. English majors only. 

Prerequisite: Literature core 



1-6 credits 



Health Care Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree Four-year Track BS, Health Care Management, Five-year Track BS, Health Care 

Management and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

For information contact Allen Minor, DBA 

The Health Care Management major will provide the student with a broad-based business and 
health industry background emphasizing the business side of health care. The coursework will 
examine in detail all aspects of the health care delivery system, including all levels and 
modalities. The reimbursement and finance system will be examined for all public and private 
payment and reimbursement systems currently in place. In addition, the strengths and 
weaknesses of today's U.S. Health Care System of health care delivery, outcomes, 
measurement and financing mechanism are examined in detail. Recent proposals for health 
care reform are described, debated, and critically evaluated, while incremental measures 
currently under consideration are thoroughly examined. 

Health Care Management BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 


3 


HCM 101 


Intro, to Health Systems 3 




Technology 




MIS 110 


Intro, to Information 3 


ACC101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 




Systems 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


HP 110 


Intro, to HC Informatics 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential Communications 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics 


3 


BUS 269 


Principles of Marketing 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 


3 


HP 120 


Current Issues and Trends 2 



in HCI 



7 72 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 3 




Core 3 


BUS 371 


Financial Management 3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 3 


MIS 200 


Systems Analysis 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

Core 3 

Core 3 

BUS 307 Management Science 3 

BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 

HCM 371 HC Reimburse and 3 

Finance 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

BUS 360 Mgmt of Human 3 

Resources 

HCM 403 Health Care Strategic 3 

Mgmt 

BUS 415 International Business 3 

Free Elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 6 




Core 3 


MIS 432 


Database Mgmt 3 


HP 230 


HC Informatics Internship 1 


HCM 406 


Current Issues & Trends 3 




inHC 




Free Elective 3 




Free Elective 3 


Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Health Care Management Major Health Care Informatics Specialization 

The specialization in health care informatics provides a strong, generalist foundation in this 
rapidly, developing science. This specialization is designed to prepare students for entry into 
the health care informatics field and to enhance career advancement opportunities. The 
course sequence emphasizes a strong, basic background in information technology and 
provides students with the requisite skills needed to prepare them to work with health care 
informatics applications such as use of the electronic health record and telehealth. Students 
who complete the health care informatics specialization will be prepared to analyze, design 
and implement technology systems within a health care organization. The sequence may also 
be taken as a certificate, page 118. 

Health Care Management Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core 




3 


Core 


3 


Core 




3 


Core 


3 


Core 




3 


Core 


3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential Communications 3 




Technology 




MIS 110 


Intro to Information 3 


ACC101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 




Systems 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 113 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Core 

Core 

Core 

HCM 101 

BUS 208 



Intro to Health Systems 
Principles of 
Management 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Second Semester 

Core 

Core 

Core 

BUS 269 

BUS 207 



Principles of Marketing 

Contemporary 

Economics 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 

BUS 371 Financial Management 

BUS 352 Business Law 

BUS 360 Human Resource Mgmt 

Free elective 



5 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


3 


Core 3 


3 


Free elective 3 


3 


BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 


3 


HCM 371 HC Reimburse & Finance 3 


3 


Free elective 3 



Senior Year 



First Semester 
Core course 
HCM 401 
HCM 403 



BUS 415 
Free elective 



Total Credits 15 
3 
Managed Care 3 

Health Care Strategic 3 

Mgmt 
International Business 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core course 3 

3 HCM 452 Health Care Law 3 

3 HCM 469 Health Care Marketing 3 

HCM 406 Current Iss./ Trends in 3 
3 HC 

3 Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Health Care Management and 
MBA, see MBA program description. 



Health Care Management Major Management Specialization 

The specialization in management will provide the student with a broad-based business and 
health industry background emphasizing the business side of health care. The coursework wil 
examine in detail all aspects of the health care delivery system, including all levels and 
modalities. The reimbursement and finance system will be examined for all public and private 
payment and reimbursement systems currently in place. In addition, the strengths and 
weaknesses of today's U.S. Health Care System of health care delivery, outcomes, 
measurement and financing mechanism are examined in detail. Recent proposals for health 
care reform are described, debated, and critically evaluated, while incremental measures 
currently under consideration are thoroughly examined. 



114 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Health Care Management Management Specialization Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 



First Year 










First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core course 




3 


Core course 


3 


Core course 




3 


Core course 


3 


Core course 




3 


Core course 


3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 
Technology 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential 3 
Communications 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 


MIS 110 


Intro to Information 3 
Systems 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Core course 




3 


Core course 3 


Core course 




3 


Core course 3 


Core course 




3 


Core course 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary 


3 


BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 




Economics 




HCM 101 Intro to Health Systems 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of 
Management 


3 




Junior Year 








First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core course 




3 


Core course 3 


Core course 




3 


Free elective 3 


Core course 




3 


BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 


BUS 371 


Financial Management 


3 


HCM 371 HC Reimburse & Finance 3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 360 Management of Human 3 


BUS 360 


Human Resource Mgmt 


3 


Resources 


Free elective 




3 




Senior Year 









First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core course 3 

BUS 465* Special Topics in 3 

Business 

HCM 403 Health Care Strategic 3 

Mgmt 

BUS 415 International Business 3 

Free elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

Core course 3 

BUS 420 Small Business Mgmt. 3 

HCM 469 Health Care Marketing 3 

HCM 406 Current Iss./ Trends in 2 

HC 
Free elective 3 

7"ofa/ required for graduation 120 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 115 



Health Care Management Major Marketing Specialization 

The health care management degree with a marketing specialization explores both provider 
and consumer perspectives of health care marketing, market distribution channels, and the 
impact the Internet has had on both marketing and market distribution. The marketing 
specialization will prepare students for a marketing or sales career in health care by offering a 
strong base of business-related marketing courses, along with marketing specifically related to 
the health care industry. It will prepare students for careers in a broad range of health care 
institutions, both public and private. Hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, 
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are examples of those employing sales and 
marketing professionals. 

Health Care Management Marketing Specialization Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 
Technology 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential 3 
Communications 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 


MIS 110 


Intro, to Information 3 
Systems 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary 


3 


BUS 269 


Principles of Marketing 3 




Economics 




HCM 101 


Intro, to Health Systems 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of 
Management 


3 







Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 371 


Financial Management 


3 


BUS 321 


Product and Service 3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 




Mrkting 


BUS 360 


Mgmt. of Human 


3 


BUS 306 


Organizational Behavior 3 




Resources 




HCM 371 


HC Reimburse and 3 




Free elective 


3 


BUS 307 


Finance 

Management Science 3 



116 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 14 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 450 


Marketing Research 


3 


BUS 401 


Channel Strategies 3 


HCM 403 


Health Care Strategic 


3 


HCM 469 


Health Care Marketing 3 




Mgmt 




HCM 406 


Current Iss. and Trends 2 


BUS 415 


International Business 


3 




in HC 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 3 








Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Health Care Management Course Descriptions (HCM) 

101 Introduction to Health Systems 3 credits 

The course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the health care system 
in the United States. It describes the basic components of the delivery system, and 
examines the history and evolution of the system. Trends in health care management, 
delivery, and financing are analyzed, including a critical analysis of the system, examining 
its strengths and weaknesses. The features of Medicare and Medicaid programs, including 
possible future funding scenarios, are thoroughly examined. 

371 Health Care Reimbursement and Finance 3 credits 

This course provides a broad-based overview of the managerial aspects of health care 
finance, beginning with a brief review of accounting systems in health care institutions. A 
comprehensive review of health care reimbursement structures is presented for acute care 
facilities, nursing homes, rehabilitation facilities, home health, and hospitals. Cost behavior 
and cost analysis concepts are examined. Budgeting and internal control, including 
auditing concepts and techniques, are explored. Service volume financial modeling 
techniques are explained. 

Prerequisites: BUS 371 Finance, HCM 101 Intro to Health Systems 

401 Managed Care 3 credits 

This course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of managed 
care in the United States. It describes the environment leading to the development of 
managed care, its intended purpose, the types of managed care organizations, strengths 
and weaknesses of managing care, and its impact on consumers and providers. 

403 Health Care Strategic Management 3 credits 

In this course the student will develop skills to manage health services organizations from 
a strategic perspective. It will examine the use of systematic assessment of both the 
internal and external environment of the organization. Emphasis will be placed on the 
development of business strategies to meet the needs of multiple markets. Recent 
successes and failures in the health care industry will be studied. 

Prerequisites: HCM 101 Intro to Health systems 

406 Current Issues and Trends in Health Care Management 3 credits 

This is an issues-oriented course that examines the health care delivery system in the 
United States that reviews the entire continuum of care relative to current trends and 
recent changes in legislation, market forces, and consumer attitudes and preferences. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 117 



The key issues confronting health care today will be identified, causes will be 
examined, and reasonable solutions will be proposed and debated. 

Prerequisites: HCM 371 Health Care Reimbursement and Finance, HCM 403 Health 
Care Strategic Management 

452 Health Care Law 3 credits 

This course is designed to give students a comprehensive understanding of health 
care law in the United States. It describes the basic components of the law impacting 
healthcare, and the evolution of the law leading up to the current statutes, regulations 
and case law. 

469 Health Care Marketing 3 credits 

Health care marketing will provide an examination of marketing principles and processes 
related to health care organizations. It is an introduction to the process of marketing 
products, services, and organizations in the health care industry to meet the needs of 
domestic and global customers. Product, price, distribution channels, service and 
marketing communication strategies are examined. It explores the provider and consumer 
perspectives of marketing, as well as the impact of the Internet on delivery systems. 
Company analysis, market segmentation, the use of market research, product pricing and 
distribution, advertising, and target markets are examined. 

Prerequisites: BUS 269 Principles of Marketing, HCM 101 Intro to Health Systems 

Certificate in Health Care Management 

The Health Care Management major is also offered as a 15-credit certificate. The 
courses required to complete the certificate program are as follows: * 

HCM 101- Introduction to Health Systems 

HCM 403- Health Care Strategic Management 

HCM 469- Health Care Marketing 

HCM 371- Health Care Reimbursement and Finance 

HCM 406- Current Issues and Trends in Health Care 

• Prerequisites as listed in course descriptions will apply to all courses shown above. 
Please refer to course descriptions. 

According to a study recently released by the U.S. Department of Labor, six of ten 
fastest growing jobs to the year 2020 are in health care. In Northeastern 
Pennsylvania, these jobs will grow at an even faster rate. 

The certificate program in health care management is designed for: business and 
health care professionals having a degree in another discipline, enabling these 
individuals to advance in the health care field; or those who are planning a career 
change to the health care field, thus requiring specific knowledge of today's health 
care industry. It is suitable for associates or bachelors' degree graduates in: 

• Any undergraduate major, particularly those in business, human services, nursing, 
dental hygiene, or other health discipline. 

• Any professional clinicians, including nurses, licensed professionals, dentists, and 
physicians. 

The flexibility of the program allows those without a bachelor's degree to fully apply credits 
earned in the certificate program toward the attainment of a bachelor's degree in health care 
management. 

*With permission of business chair. 



118 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



History Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BA, History 

Department Chair David Wright, PhD 

Faculty 

Allan W. Austin, Associate Professor of History, BA, MA Bowling Green State University; PhD 
University of Cincinnati 

Brian F. Carso, Jr., Assistant Professor of History, BA, MA University of Rochester; JD State 
University of NY at Buffalo, School of Law; PhD Boston University 

Donald O. Fries, Professor Emeritus of History, BA, MA, University of Michigan; PhD Michigan 
State University 

Thomas Hajkowski, Assistant Professor of History, BA Seton Hall University; MA Villanova 
University, PhD Northwestern University 

Louis Maganzin, Professor Emeritus of History, BA St. Bonaventure; MA, PhD Georgetown 
University 

David C. Wright, Associate Professor of History, BA Kenyon College; MA, PhD University of 
Wisconsin-Madison 

Following a major course of study in history provides a student with a strong liberal arts 
background. The study of history can broaden a student's perspective on local, national, and 
international issues. It fosters an understanding of the complexity of human motivation and 
action, providing a critical approach to looking at the past. The history program cultivates the 
ability to think, write, and speak clearly with thoroughness and independence. 

History majors must fulfill the core curriculum requirements in addition to completing 33 credits 
in history. Advanced history courses require six credits of core history/political science courses 
as prerequisites. 

General Requirements 

Incoming first-year students seeking admission as history majors must meet the general and 
specific admissions requirements of the university as stated in this catalog. In cases where the 
student does not fully meet them, a personal interview is required. 

Continuation as a history major requires that the student maintain a minimum of a 2.0 or "C" 
average in the major and a similar total grade point average. A student on academic probation 
for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed from the major. 

Transfer students must complete all the history requirements as listed in the sequence of 
courses in this catalog. 

Internship 

Internships for history majors are assigned on the basis of availability. Pre-law internships are 
required as a part of the pre-law specialization. Majors who desire to pursue internships must 
receive prior approval of the department chair or work out the details with the pre-law advisor. 
Internships may only be taken if the student has a "B" average in the major and is a fully 
accredited junior or senior. 

Recommendation 

To receive a recommendation for graduate study or law school, the student must maintain the 
minimum of a "B" in the major, pre-law specialization, and total grade point average. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 119 



History BA Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses (without specialization or certification) 



First Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


HIS 101 


Western Civilization I 


3 


HIS 102 


Western Civilization II 3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank II 3 


ENG 


Core 


3 


ENG 


Core 3 


PHL100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


PHL 


Core 3 


POL 100 


American Natl. 
Government 


3 


POL 103G 


Global Politics 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


FA 


Core 


3 


FA 


Core 3 


SCI 


Core 


3 


SCI 


Core 3 


CPSSS 


Sociology, Psych., or 


3 


CPSSS 


Sociology, Psych., or 3 


Core. 


Econ. 




Core 


Econ. 


HIS 103 


United States History I 


3 


HIS 104 


United States History II 3 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 3 


Junior 


Year 









First Semester Total Credits 15 

HIS 405 Seminar on History 3 

RLS Core 3 

HIS 21 History of England or 3 



HIS/POL 

Senior Year 



Britain 

Free elective 
Free elective 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

HIS 491 Research Seminar 3 

RLS Core 3 

HIS Free elective 3 

HIS Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 

HIS Free elective 3 

ENG Advanced elective 3 

HIS/POL Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

HIS/POL Free elective 3 

ENG Advanced elective 3 

SOC 221 Cultural Minorities 3 

Free elective 3 

GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 3 
Total required for graduation 120 credits 



1 20 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



History Major Pre-law Specialization 

Degree BA, History 

Department Chair David Wright, PhD 

For Information Contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 

The pre-law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of American Law 
Schools, which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts 
background. The program provides sound preparation for the Law School Admission Test and 
the graduate study of law. 

History Pre-law Specialization Degree 

Suggested Course of Study 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


HIS 101 


Western Civilization I 3 


PHL 100 


Introduction to Philosophy 3 


CPSSS 


Sociology, Psychology, or 3 


Core. 


Econ. 


ENG 


Core 3 


POL 100 


American National 3 




Government 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

HIS 102 Western Civilization II 3 

PHL Core 3 

CPSSS Sociology, Psychology, or 3 

Core Econ. 

ENG Core 3 

POL 103 Global Politics 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Total Credits 15 
3 



FA Core 

MTH Mathematics Bank I 3 

HIS 103 United States History I 3 

POL 251 Law Seminar I 3 

SCI Core 3 



Second Semester 

FA 

MTH 

HIS 104 

POL 252 

SCI 



Total Credits 15 
Core 3 

Mathematics Bank II 3 

United States History II 3 

Law Seminar II 3 

Core 3 



Junior Year 



First Semester 



Total Credits 15 



HIS 405 Seminar on History 3 

RLS Core 3 

HIS 21 History of England or Britain 3 
POL 405 American Constitutional Law I c 

Free elective 3 



Second Semester 



Total Credits 15 



HIS 491 Research Seminar 3 

RLS Core 3 

HIS Free Elective 3 

POL 406 American Constitutional Law II 3 

Free elective 3 



Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

HIS Free Elective 3 

ENG Advanced Elective 3 

SOC 221 Cultural Minorities 3 

POL 450 Law Internship I 3 

BUS 352 Business Law 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

HIS/POL Free Elective 3 

ENG Advanced Elective 3 

GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 3 
POL 451 Law Internship II 3 

POL Advanced Elective 3 

The total required for graduation 120 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 21 



History Major Secondary Education Certification 

Degree BA, History 

Department Chair David Wright, PhD 

The Secondary Education Program in Citizenship is designed to prepare students to become 
secondary school social studies teachers, and in particular to equip them with the skills to 
identify and assist students with learning disabilities. The emphasis is on history, along with a 
number of courses in political science, geography, sociology, anthropology, and economics. 
This program has been continually refined to keep pace with developments in the field of 
education. Fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, this program leads 
to a teaching certificate valid in Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) and transferable to many other 
states. See history/secondary education, page 254 for further information. 

History Course Descriptions (HIS) 

101 History of Western Civilization I 3 credits 

This course is a study of the main currents in Western cultural, social, political, and 
intellectual history from the classical period to the Napoleonic era. Emphasis is on the 
social development of culture and the intellect of the classical period and how Western 
society has transformed and strengthened them. The course includes discussions of 
texts from a critical point of view along with written assignments. 

102 History of Western Civilization II 3 credits 
This course is a study of the main currents in Western cultural, social, political, and 
intellectual history from the Napoleonic era to the present. Emphasis is on the social 
themes that influenced and shaped the modern Western world. The course will include 
discussions of texts from a critical point of view along with written assignments 

1 03 United States History to 1 865 3 credits 
A survey of significant political, economic, social, and intellectual themes in the 
development of the United States from Colonial times until 1865. 

104 United States History since 1865 3 credits 
American society is based upon combined cultures and groups. This course is a study of 
how that multicultural framework is embedded in the narrative of American history since 
the Civil War. Emphasis is on the participation, problems, and contributions of women, 
Native Americans, African Americans, immigrants, labor, and other minority groups. This 
course includes analytical writing and discussion of readings. 

201 History of 19th Century Revolutions 3 credits 

Detailed study of the political, social and intellectual events that culminated in the 
revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848. Emphasis is on the industrial and economic 
conditions that led to 19th century radical movements. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand) 

204 Survey of Latin America: Modern 3 credits 

History 204 surveys Latin American civilization from 1810, the era of Independence, to 
the contemporary period. Part I takes up the history of nineteenth-century Latin America, 
first analyzing the challenges of Independence, and then describing the impact of 
economic modernization from 1870. Part II examines the 20th century — the era of Latin 
American Revolutions. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand) 
1 22 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



207 History of Russia 3 credits 
Study of the great Kievan empire, the Mongol yoke, the rise of Muscovite Tsars, the 
expansion of absolutism, and empire and social revolution. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

208 History of the Soviet Union 3 credits 
The development of the Soviet Union from its revolutionary beginnings in 1917 through 
social upheaval, the terror of the purges, the tragedy and triumph of World War II, and 
the dismantling of the Soviet system. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

210 History of England 3 credits 
A detailed study of the Tudor-Stuart period. Emphasis is on the reigns of Henry VIII and 
Elizabeth I. The course culminates with the crisis between crown and parliament under 
the Stuart kings. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

211 History of Britain 3 credits 
The development of British history from 1689 to the present. This course stresses the 
development of parliamentary government, the growth of the empire, and the emergence 
of Great Britain as a leading world power. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

213 Modern French History 3 credits 

This course surveys the events of the Napoleonic Era, Restoration Period, July 
Monarchy, Second Republic, Second Empire, and Third Republic. It concludes by 
examining France during and since World War II. In addition to the country's stormy 
political history, social and cultural changes are also analyzed. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

320 Selected Studies in History 3 credits 
A lecture and discussion approach to the study of special themes in history. On request, 
students may take this course more than once if the theme they are studying differs. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. (On demand) 

321 Nazi Germany 3 credits 
An in-depth study of totalitarianism focusing primarily in Germany from 1920-1945. 
Emphasis on the career of Adolph Hitler, the SS, the Nazi state, the destruction of 
European Jewry, and World War Two. Secondary emphasis on the phenomena of 
racism and nationalism. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

322 World Wars, Cold War, and Beyond 3 credits 

In the 20th century, the United States emerged as the world's strongest nation. This 
course offers a survey of U.S. foreign relations during that time. It examines issues, 
including both World Wars, origins and history of the Cold War, episodes of 
international revolutionary nationalism, wars in Korea, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf, 
U.S. /Latin American relations, years of nuclear deterrence, and the challenges of 
globalization. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science core sequence. (On 
demand) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 23 



325 The Civil War Era 3 credits 

This course examines the regional events leading to the outbreak of the Civil War, the 
prosecution of the War, and its aftermath. It surveys the experiences of Americans — 
southern and northern, white and black-exploring how they were affected by and how 
they influenced the events of the time and nation. 

Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years 

328 American Women's History 3 credits 

This course explores women's experiences in the United States from Colonial times to 
the present. It surveys women of different ethnic, racial, and class backgrounds, 
exploring how women were affected by, and how they themselves influenced, the 
historic events of the nation. 

Prerequisite: History/Political Science core sequence. Alternate years 

330 Immigration and American Ethnic History 3 credits 

This course examines the history of the United States as the history of immigration. 
Emphasis is placed on better understanding the multicultural history of the United States 
through the study of both primary and secondary evidence. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

340 Film and History 3 credits 

This course examines the relationship between film and history, with an emphasis on the 
utility of studying film to better understand the past. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

405 History Seminar 3 credits 

A reading and discussion seminar focusing on one of the following topics: recent 
American history or European intellectual history. 
Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Offered annually 

407 European Cultural Movements 3 credits 
The course introduces the student to the major artistic and literary movements of late 
19th and early 20th century continental Europe. The student develops an understanding 
of the historical and aesthetic significance of such avant-garde movements. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

408 Europe Since 1945 3 credits 
This course describes and analyzes the economic, social, political, and cultural 
developments that have taken place in Europe since 1945. Major topics that are studied 
include rebuilding Europe physically and psychologically after World War II, the advent of 
the Cold War, the events of 1968, and recent problems, such as reactions to 
immigration. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey. Alternate years 

410 Seminar on Global Issues 3 credits 

A reading and discussion seminar focusing on different political, social, and economic 
issues which affect the late 20th-century world. This course explores current issues in an 
historical perspective. 

(On demand) 



1 24 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



413 History Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

Prerequisite: Permission of director. (On demand) 

450 History Internship 3 credits 

Directed field experience in archival and/or museum projects for junior and senior 
students. Students are supervised by professional staff in cooperation with history 
faculty. Permission of the instructor required. 

Prerequisite: Permission of director. (On demand) 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

(On demand) 

491 Research Seminar 3 credits 

An introduction to historical methods and research. Students select a topic for a bachelor 
thesis and then are guided in their research and writing. Offered annually. Required of 
history majors, usually taken in the junior year. 

Prerequisites: Two semesters of History/Political Science Survey 



Information Technology Major Management Information Systems (MIS) 
Specialization 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree Four-year Track BS, Information Technology, Five-year Track BS, Information 

Technology and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

For information contact Sr. Patricia Lapczynski, RSM, BA, MS, DPS 

The information technology degree with a specialization in MIS constitutes an interdisciplinary 
approach to modern information systems, providing strong foundations in business and 
computer science as they relate to business information management, development, and 
operations. It provides a melding of the two disciplines since the development of a computer- 
based information system is not merely a technological exercise; it also has managerial, 
organizational, and behavioral implications. The information technology degree with a 
specialization in MIS offers a strong foundation in computer science, business theory and 
practice, and the related role of information flow within an organization. 

The information technology degree with a specialization in MIS provides majors a balance of 
theory and practice in both disciplines and prepares students for entry-level positions in such 
fields as systems analysis, systems design, and information systems management. 

Students are given instruction in business writing and presentation skills. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 125 



Information Technology (MIS Specialization) Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Technology 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential Communications 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 


3 


MIS 110 


Introduction to Information 3 
Systems 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Ct 




Core 


3 




Core 




Core 


3 




Core 


BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics 


3 


MIS 121 


Programming II 


MIS 101 


Programming I 


3 


BUS 269 


Principles of Marketing 


ACC101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 


ACC311 


Managerial Accounting 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

MIS 310 Managerial Applications of 3 
OOP I 

MIS 200 Systems Analysis 3 

BUS 352 Business Law 3 



Second Semester 

Core 

Core 
MIS 312 Software Engineering 
BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 
BUS 360 Management of Human 

Resources 

Elective 



Total Credits 16-18 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1-3 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Core 
MIS 231 



MIS 220 
BUS 371 
BUS 415 



Total Credits 15 
3 
Introduction to File 3 

Processing 

Applied Networking Design 3 
Finance 3 

International Business 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 12-15 

Core 3 

MIS 432 Database Management 3 

Elective 2-3 

MIS 491 Information Technology 

Management 3 

Elective 1-3 

Total required for graduation 123 credits 



For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Information Technology (MIS 
Specialization) and MBA, see MBA program description, page 324. 



126 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Management Information Systems Course Descriptions (MIS) 

101 Programming I 3 credits 

Problem-solving methods; algorithm development; procedural and data abstraction; 
program design, and programming. Intended for students who plan to continue with 
other Computer Science courses. 

110 Introduction to Information Systems 3 credits 

An interdisciplinary study that views information as an economic resource. The course 
focuses on computer-based information systems that support the operations, 
management, and decision functions of an organization and explores the basic technical, 
behavioral, economic, and organizational concepts relevant to information, decision 
making, and systems. Topics include the methodology and practice of developing a 
computerized information system; the organization, management and control of the 
information system; and the social impact of information technologies. 

121 Programming II 3 credits 

Control structures, top-down programming, and stepwise refinement. Debugging, testing, 
and documentation. Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours. 

200 Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation 3 credits 

A study of systems analysis from the standpoint of the life-cycle phases of information 
systems. Emphasis is on the development of information systems, information 
requirements analysis, the system design phase, the implementation phase, and system 
administration. 

Prerequisite: MIS 110 

220 Applied Networking Design 3 credits 

This course examines recent advances and new applications in the field of computer 
networks and telecommunications. Technical fundamentals, architectures and design of 
computer networks, strategies, tools and techniques of network planning, 
implementation, management, maintenance, and security are also covered. 

231 Introduction to File Processing 3 credits 

File terminology, structure, and manipulation techniques. Sequential and random access 
bulk storage devices. Applications of data structures and file processing techniques. 
Introduction to COBOL. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours 

Alternate years 

310 Managerial Applications of Object-Oriented Programming I 3 credits 
This course provides a study of an object-oriented programming language as it pertains 
to managerial applications. In addition, the course introduces the use of object-oriented 
programming methodologies. 

31 1 Managerial Applications of Object-Oriented Programming II 3 credits 
This course expands object-oriented skills taught in Managerial Applications of Object- 
Oriented Programming. The emphasis in this course is on object-oriented development 
tools and development in a client-server environment. 

Prerequisite: MIS 310 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 27 



312 Software Engineering 3 credits 

Software development and procurement is an important part of information system 
design. This course emphasizes a disciplined approach to analyzing requirements and 
specifications; designing; implementing through programming, procurement, and reuse; 
delivering with adequate testing and documentation; and maintaining by adapting and 
extending the application software for an information system. 

Prerequisites: MIS 200, MIS 310 

420 Teleprocessing 3 credits 

An introduction to teleprocessing and communication networks with emphasis on 
exchange of data between systems. 

Prerequisite: MIS 110 

425 EDP Audit and Control 3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamentals of EDP auditing. Emphasis is on understanding EDP 
controls, the types of EDP audits, and concepts and techniques used in EDP audits. 

432 Data Base Management Systems Design 3 credits 

Introduction to database concepts, data models, data description languages, query 
facilities, file, and index organization. Data integrity, reliability, and security. Students 
work with real database management systems. 

Prerequisite: MIS 110 

491 Information Technology Management 3 credits 

An examination of the relevant management issues in information technology and their 
impact on a firm's competitiveness. Case study method is used. Senior status only. 

Prerequisites: MIS 200, MIS 432 



Information Technology Major Information Technology Security 
Specialization 

Degree BS, Information Technology 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

For information contact Sr. Patricia Lapczynski, RSM, BA, MS, DPS 

The information technology degree with a specialization in information technology security 
prepares information technology managers to establish the procedures, policies, and practices 
that should be in place to protect information and data. 

In recognizing the importance of writing and speaking across the curriculum, the major uses 
the Five Chapter Model for research papers and includes presentations in many major 
courses. Students are given instruction in business writing and presentation skills. 

Students transferring into the IT Security Specialization with an Associate's degree in a related 
field will need to take more than 66 credits. The specific courses required are determined 
through transcript, evaluation. 



1 28 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Information Technology Security Specialization Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Se 


}mester Total Cre 


dits 15 




Core course 


3 




Core course 


3 




Core course 


3 




Core course 


3 




Core course 


3 




Core course 


3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential 


3 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 




Communications 










MIS 110 


Intro to Information 
Systems 


3 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester 

Core course 
Core course 
Core course 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 
3 



BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 
Free elective 3 

Junior Year 



Second Semester 

Core course 



Total Credits 15 
3 



BUS 269 
ACC 311 



Core course 3 

Core course 3 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Managerial Accounting 3 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core course 3 

BUS 371 Financial Management 3 

BUS 352 Business Law 3 

1ST 200 Introduction to IT Security 3 

MIS 200 Systems Analysis 3 

Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core course 3 

1ST 410 Access Controls, Models 3 
&Cryp 

IT Privacy & Legal Issues 
International Business 



1ST 420 
BUS 415 
Free elective 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

Core course 3 

MIS 220 Applied Networking 3 

BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 

1ST 300 Security Mgt and Risk 3 

BUS 360 Management of Human 3 
Resources 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core course 3 

1ST 430 Phys Sec & Disaster 3 





Recovery 




3 


Free elective 


3 


3 


1ST 490 Current Iss. & Trends in 


3 


3 


CST 






Free elective 


3 



Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 129 



Information Technology Security Course Descriptions (ITS) 

200 Introduction to IT Security 3 credits 

This course provides a broad-based overview of information technology security. 
Emphasis is placed upon concepts and theory. Topics include access controls, network 
security, security management, application controls, physical security, disaster recovery, 
privacy laws, IT security ethics and security trends. 

Prerequisite: MIS 110 or permission of program director 

300 Security Management and Risk Assessment 3 credits 

This course will emphasize security management and risk assessment in relation to 
information security. Topics include security management responsibilities, the 
organizational security model, data classifications, policies, procedures, standards, and 
guidelines. 

Prerequisite: ITS 200 

410 Access Controls, Security Models and Cryptology 3 credits 

This course will emphasize access controls and security models related to information 
security. Cryptology will be covered from a theory perspective. Topics include main 
access controls models, administration access controls, the importance of the orange 
book importance, integrity goals and cryptology. 

Prerequisite: ITS 200 

420 Information Technology Privacy and Legal issues 3 credits 

This course will emphasize privacy and legal issues in relation to information security. 
Topics include applicable laws, investigation, ethics, identification, protection, 
prosecution, liability, and the key role of privacy. 

Prerequisite: ITS 200 

430 Physical Security and Disaster Recovery 3 credits 

This course will emphasize physical security and disaster recovery in relation to 
information security. Topics include physical security, environmental issues, contingency 
planning, and recovery and restoration. 

Prerequisite: ITS 200 

490 Current Issues and Trends in Information Technology Security 3 credits 

This course will emphasize current trends and issues in relation to information security. 
Topics include issues and trends facing CSOs (chief security officers), CPOs (chief 
privacy offices), and ClOs (chief information officers) and the providing of relevant 
technology to their clients and end-users. 

Prerequisites: ITS 300, ITS 410, ITS 420, ITS 430 



1 30 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree Four-year Track BS, Management, Five-year Track BS, Management and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 



To succeed in a professional business atmosphere, individuals must have a well-rounded 
background in all aspects of business as well as a firm grounding in the liberal arts. The 
business administration program provides the proper balance of both theory and practice. Its 
goals are to provide students with an understanding of the nature of society and to assist them 
in developing a social philosophy, which is necessary for responsible citizenship; to familiarize 
students with the American economic system and the major functional areas of business; and 
to afford students the opportunity to develop and to increase their capacity for analysis, 
evaluation, and strategic implementation of concepts. 

Students are given instruction in business writing and presentation skills 

Management Major Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Technology 


3 


BUS 107 


Essential 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 269 


Communications 

Principles of Marketing 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core 


3 




Core 3 


Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 


3 


BUS 206 


Microeconomics 3 


ACC 101 Principles of Accounting 


3 


MIS 110 


Introduction to 3 


Elective 


3 




Information Sys. 






ACC 311 


Managerial Accounting 3 


Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core 


3 




Core 3 


Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 360 Management of HR 


3 


BUS 350 


Money and Banking 3 


BUS 352 Business Law 


3 


BUS 306 


Organizational Behavior 3 


Elective 


3 


BUS 307 


Management Science 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 131 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 406 


Current Issues and 
Trends 


3 


BUS 491 


Seminar in Policies 3 
Upper-Level Business 3 




Upper-Level Business 


3 




Elective 




Elective* 




BUS 420 


Small Business 3 


BUS 371 


Finance 


3 




Management 


BUS 415 


International Business 


3 




Elective 3 








Total required for graduation 120 credits 



For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Management and MBA, see MBA 
program description, page 324. 



Marketing Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree Four-year Track BS, Marketing, Five-year Track BS, Marketing and MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

For information contact John Mellon, EdD 

Marketing concentrates on exchange processes. This major goes beyond the traditional, 
preparing students for employment in business as well as non-business organizations. Those 
who are or will be involved in managing private, public, for-profit, or non-profit organizations 
can benefit from this program. 

Opportunities in the field of marketing are expanding rapidly as organizations discover the 
importance that marketing techniques make for their continued success. Products are not the 
only things marketed. Services, ideas, places, political candidates, health care facilities, 
educational institutions, and many more organizations and concepts also benefit from using 
marketing tools. 

Students obtain jobs in a variety of organizations and in a variety of positions, such as 
advertising, public relations, sales, product and brand management, marketing research, 
purchasing, retailing, wholesaling, and many others. 

Students are given instruction in business writing and presentation skills. 

Marketing Major Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

BUS 105 Basic Technology 3 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

BUS 107 Essential Communications 3 

BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 



1 32 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics 


3 


BUS 321 


Product and Service 3 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting 


3 




Marketing 


BUS 340 


Promotion and Advertising 


3 


MIS 110 


Introduction to Information 3 

Systems 

Elective 3 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 304 


Sales and Sales 


3 


BUS 401 


Channel Strategies 3 




Management 




BUS 306 


Organizational Behavior 3 


BUS 352 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 360 


Management of Human 3 




Elective 


3 




Resources 


Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 450 


Marketing Research 


3 


BUS 403 


Strategic Marketing 3 




Upper-Level Business 


3 




Upper-Level Business 3 




Elective* 






Elective 


BUS 371 


Finance 


3 


BUS 402 


Pricing Strategies 3 


BUS 415 


International Business 


3 




Elective 3 



Total required for graduation 120 credits 
For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Marketing and MBA, see MBA 
program description, page 324. 



Mathematics Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Degree BS or BA, Mathematics 
Department Chair Patrick Touhey, PhD 

Faculty 

Jerry Bradford, Associate Professor of Mathematics, BA Indiana Wesleyan University; MS, PhD 
The University of Iowa 

Jay Stine, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, BA Shippensburg University; MS, PhD, University 
of Miami 

Steven J. Tedford, Visiting Assistant Professor in Mathematics, BA, MS Marist College, PhD 
Binghamton University 

Patrick Touhey, Professor of Mathematics, BA Fordham University; PhD City University of New 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 33 



York 

Mathematics has been called the queen of the sciences. In recent years, the increased use of 
statistics and quantitative methods, combined with the computer revolution, have caused 
mathematics to pervade not only the physical sciences, but the life and social sciences as 
well. Mathematical techniques are widely used in research, in industry, manufacturing, 
commerce, and government. Recognizing these broad applications, this major in mathematics 
was designed to expose students to both classical and contemporary areas. 

The mathematics major prepares students for careers in business, industry or government, or 
for future study in graduate or professional school. 

Students may choose to pursue either a BS or BA degree in mathematics. The required 
mathematics courses for either degree are the same. Students who choose a BA must 
complete PHY 221-222; those choosing a BS must complete PHY 221-222 and either CHM 
133-134 or BIO 101-102. 

Upper-level courses are offered in alternate years (see course descriptions for details), so that 
a student's schedule may not follow this sequence exactly. The above would be typical for a 
traditional first-year student whose first semester begins in the fall of an odd numbered year 
(e.g., 2007). 



Mathematics BS or BA Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

CPS101 Intro, to Programming 3 



MTH 151 



Calculus I 
Core 
Core 
Core 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

CPS 121 Computer Programming 3 

MTH 152 Calculus II 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second S 


MTH 225 


Calculus III 


4 


MTH 363 


MTH 244 


Set Theory and Logic 


3 


MTH 215 


PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 


PHY 222 




Core 


3 






Core 


3 





ister Total Credits 16 

Abstract Algebra I 3 

Mathematical Statistics 3 

General Physics II 4 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


MTH 364 


Abstract Algebra II 


3 


MTH 341 Real Analysis I 3 


MTH 241 


Linear Algebra 


3 


MTH 242 Differential Equations 3 


MTH 


Free elective 


3 


Core 3 




Core 


3 


Core 3 




Free elective 


4 


Free elective 4 



1 34 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

MTH342 Real Analysis II 3 

Free elective 3 

MTH 480 Independent Study 3 

Free elective 3 

Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 12 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Core 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 122 credits 



Mathematics Course Descriptions (MTH) 

095 College Algebra and Trigonometry 3 credits 

Linear equations, inequalities, functions, graphing, logarithms and exponentials, circular 
functions. 



115 



120 



151 



152 



Fall/Spring 

Basic Statistics 3 credits 

An introduction to the use of statistical methods with emphasis on practical applications. 
Descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, estimation of parameters, introduction to 
hypothesis testing, correlation, and linear regression. 

Mathematical Reasoning 3 credits 

Development of quantitative problem solving. Methods of problem solving. Reading, 
determining, and solving problems using basic arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. 
Common mathematical models of everyday phenomena. 



3 credits 



3 credits 



Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 
Basic concepts, limits, derivatives, and applications. 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 

Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, and applications. 

Prerequisite: MTH 151. Each Spring 

160 Discrete Mathematics 3 credits 

Emphasizes the application of discrete mathematics, including combinatorics, graphs, 
recursively defined sequences, social choice, fair division, etc. 

200 History of Mathematics 3 credits 

The place of mathematics in human enterprise and the central role it has played in the 
development of civilization. Topics chosen include the history of mathematics, 
contributions by various cultures, geometry, calculus, number theory, modern logic, and 
unsolved problems. 



Prerequisite: MTH 152. Fall (odd years only) 
215 Mathematical Statistics 



3 credits 



Probability theory, games of chance, probability distributions, testing of hypotheses, 
curve fitting, and correlation. 

Prerequisite: MTH 152. Spring (odd years only) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 135 



225 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 credits 

Polar coordinates, parametric equations, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, 
sequences, and series. 

Prerequisite: MTH 152. Each Fall 

241 Linear Algebra 3 credits 
Systems of linear equations, vector space, inner products, determinants, eigenvalues 
and eigenvectors, and applications. 

Prerequisite: MTH 152. Fall (odd years only) 

242 Differential Equations 3 credits 
Equations of first order and degree, higher order, and degree equations, including linear 
with constant coefficients, and systems of equations. 

Prerequisite: MTH 225. Each Spring 

244 Set Theory and Logic 3 credits 

Introduction to set theory, equivalence and order, Boolean algebra, introduction to logic, 
and rules of inference. 

Each Fall 

341 Real Analysis I 3 credits 
Real number system, topology, sequences, limits, continuity, and differentiability. 

Prerequisites: MTH 225, MTH 241. Spring (even years only) 

342 Real Analysis II 3 credits 
Continuation of MTH 341, including measure and integration. 

Prerequisite: MTH 341. Fall (even years only) 

351 Geometry 3 credits 

History of geometry, axiom systems, types of geometries, and axiomatic development of 
a geometric theory. 

Fall (even years only) 

363 Abstract Algebra I 3 credits 

Introduction to abstract algebra, groups, and introduction to rings and fields. 

Prerequisite: MTH 225. Spring (odd years only) 

364 Abstract Algebra II 3 credits 

Rings, integral domains, fields, and polynomials. 

Prerequisite: MTH 363. Fall (odd years only) 

413 Math Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 



1 36 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

(On demand) 

486 Special Topics in Mathematics 1-3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration 
information. 

490 Mathematics Seminar 3 credits 

Prerequisite: Permission of department. (On demand) 



Medical Imaging Programs 

College of Health Sciences 

Department Chair Elaine Halesey, EdD, RT, (R)(QM) 

Faculty and Staff 

Gina Cordiano, Clinical Coordinator, Medical Imaging, BS College Misehcordia 

Sheryl Goss, Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Medical Sonography, AAS, BS, MS College 
Misehcordia 

Elaine D. Halesey, Professor of Medical Imaging, AAS College Misehcordia; BS Bloomsburg 
University; MS College Misehcordia; EdD Nova Southeastern University 

Karen Klimas, Clinical Coordinator, Diagnostic Medical Sonography, BS College Misehcordia 

Paula Pate-Schloder, Associate Professor of Medical Imaging, AS Pima Community College- 
Tucson; BS Northern Arizona University-Flagstaff; MS College Misehcordia 

Loraine D. Zelna, Associate Professor of Medical Imaging, BS Bloomsburg University; MS College 
Misehcordia 

Medical Imaging Major 

Degree BS, Medical Imaging 

Options: Management Minor; General Track; BS/MS in 

Organizational Management; Combined BS/Certificate in Diagnostic Medical Sonography 

Certificate Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) 

The medical imaging program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in 
Radiologic Technology 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182 phone: 
(312)704-5300 as well as by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The most recent 
accreditation review in 2006 awarded the program the maximum period that could be granted. 
The next review is scheduled for 2014. 

With a focus on radiography, the program provides students with didactic and laboratory 
instruction in conjunction with practical application to human subjects. This instruction 
provides students with knowledge and practical skills necessary to assume positions in 
diagnostic radiology or other imaging modalities, or to pursue certification in specialty areas. 
Students are eligible to sit for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists Examination 
in radiography upon graduation. 

Philosophy 

The medical imaging department subscribes to the philosophy of the university and believes 
that the radiologic technologist is an integral member of the health care team. Our program is 
designed to provide the professional skills, progressive maturity, and the intellectual, social, 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 37 



emotional, and spiritual values for the student to be entrusted with the responsibilities that go 
along with being a member of the health care team. 

The curriculum is based on these philosophical and theological implications, making it 
necessary for the student to learn the necessary scientific principles as well as accept 
responsibilities for the patient, fellow human beings, the profession, and self. 

The philosophy, then, of the medical imaging program is to educate the student to become a 
holistic and professional person who is not only educated in the art and science of medical 
imaging, but one who also, through education and experience, has become a well-rounded, 
mature, concerned, and skilled professional. In addition, the program will strive: 

• To continue improvements in the educational program in radiography to serve the 
increasing needs of individuals desiring to be radiologic technologists. 

• To maintain accreditation with national organizations in the delivery of radiography 
education. 

• To promote continuing education with a liberal arts component for non-traditional 
students in the field of medical imaging. 

• To participate in professional and community activities for the purpose of brining 
education, service and research together for the improvement of health care delivery. 

• To educate the individual to become a holistic and professional person, that is, one 
who is not only educated in the art and science of medical imaging, but who, through 
education and experience, has become a well-rounded, mature, concerned and skilled 
professional. 

Program Goals: 

Goal 1. Clinical Performance and Competence 

Students will possess the knowledge and skills necessary to function as an 
entry-level radiologic technologist. 

Goal 2. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking 

Students will demonstrate problem solving and critical thinking skills. 

Goal 3. Communication 

Students will demonstrate effective communication skills with patients, staff, 
peers and other health care professionals. 

Goal 4. Professional Growth and Development 

Students /graduates will demonstrate evidence of professional development 
and/or continuing education. 

Goal 5. Overall Program Effectiveness 

The program will graduate competent, employable, entry-level radiologic 
technologists in a timely manner. 

Curricula 

The bachelor of science degree in medical imaging incorporates the university's core 
curriculum requirements that provide a liberal arts foundation. Building on the broad-based 
general education, the program provides all necessary course work as mandated by the Joint 
Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT), a national accrediting 
agency for medical imaging programs in the United States. 



1 38 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Students have the opportunity to pursue one of four degree options, which reflect the diversity 
of career paths in medical imaging. All four of the curricula prepare students to be 
radiographers, and no matter what option is chosen, students at the same level in the program 
will be enrolled in the same medical imaging courses. 

Option 1: BS, Medical Imaging: General Program 

This curriculum provides the same solid medical imaging education as the other options, but 
allows for more flexibility to pursue other areas of interest through free electives. 

Option 2: BS, Medical Imaging, Management Minor 

This curriculum provides students with a strong background in the skills and theory necessary 
for supervisory or administrative positions. 

Option 3: BS, Medical Imaging with MS, Organizational Management (OM) 

Another option within the undergraduate degree in medical imaging is to pursue a combined 
five-year, BS/MS degree. Students considering pursuing the minor in management track within 
the BS major may wish to consider expanding that education to an earned master's degree. 
This option provides students with the knowledge and skills to function in positions of medical 
imaging services by using management skills in organizational environments. 

Within the organizational management curriculum is the choice for students to specialize in 
either human resources or management. Upon successful completion of the medical imaging 
requirements after year four, students are eligible to sit for the national certification exam in 
radiography. Upon successful completion of the fifth-year requirements, students will be 
awarded a master of science in organizational management (OM). In the event a student 
pursues this option but decides not to complete the fifth year, he or she can still earn a BS in 
Medical Imaging with a minor in management, providing all undergraduate requirements for 
those areas are met. 

Entrance requirements for both the medical imaging major and graduate program in OM must 
be met, and an academic advisor from each program will be assigned. Additional details about 
this option can be obtained from the director of either program. 

Admission Criteria 

In addition to the admission criteria for the graduate Organizational Management (OM) 
program: 

1 . Students wishing to pursue the combined BS/MS track must notify the director of the 
OM program, in writing, of their intent to pursue this degree. This letter is to be 
submitted during the spring semester of the junior year, and a copy provided to their 
medical imaging advisor. 

2. During the fall semester, senior year, students must submit the completed graduate 
application (obtain from the Center for Adult and Continuing Education). A minimum 
overall GPA of 2.8 is required in order to apply. 

3. Because formal admission cannot be granted until a student earns an undergraduate 
degree, students must notify the director of the OM program , in writing, once he/she 
has graduated, indicating the intent to pursue this degree. Applicants are eligible for 
full admission to the graduate program providing they meet the admission criteria 
outlined in the OM section of this catalog. 

For complete information on the admission requirements for the master of science in 
organizational management, page 373. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 139 



Option 4: BS Medical Imaging, Certificate-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (DMS) 

This curriculum combines both the medical imaging education with the sonography program to 
prepare students to become highly qualified individuals in both disciplines, with the ability to 
perform diagnostic patient services in both diagnostic radiography and sonography. 

Entrance requirements for both the medical imaging major and certificate in diagnostic medical 
sonography must be met, and an academic advisor from each program will be assigned. 
Additional details about this option can be obtained from the director of either program. 

Internship Option 

The internship option is an intensive experience in a particular specialty area of medical 
imaging in order to gain cross-training and/or experience under the direct supervision of a 
radiologic technologist skilled in that area. The student has the option of applying for an 
internship in one of the following areas (availability of areas may vary depending upon 
commitments from clinical education centers): CT, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance 
imaging (MRI), mammography, cardiac catheterization, special procedures, bone 
densitometry, or radiation oncology. 

Policies 

In addition to the general policies of Misericordia University, the following regulations apply: 

Transfer students will be considered, providing they meet the minimal overall GPA 
requirements of 2.75, the entrance requirements are met, and space is available. However, 
they must follow the sequence of courses for the major as listed in the catalog beginning with 
the fall semester sophomore year. Depending upon the number of credits accepted for 
transfer, students may complete all graduation requirements for the medical imaging program 
by December of the senior year. Grades of "C-" or below from external schools do not transfer. 

The medical imaging program has formal articulation agreements with both Luzerne County 
Community College's Associate in Science Degree in General Studies Program and Keystone 
College's Associate Degree in Applied Science in Allied Health (Radiologic Technology) 
Program. Graduates of either program who have successfully completed the stated curricula 
may enter Misericordia's Medical Imaging Program at the professional level under the dual- 
admission agreement. 

Classification of Students 

Due to the sequential nature of the medical imaging curricula, students are identified in levels, 
regardless of their standing according to the program's classification, as: 

Freshman: Those students enrolled in Ml 100, Introduction to Medical Imaging; 

Sophomore: Those students enrolled in Ml 112, Methods of Patient Care (fall), 
and Ml 140, Clinic I (spring); 

Junior: Those students enrolled in Ml 225, Clinic III (fall), and Ml 245, 

Clinic IV (spring); 

Senior: Those students enrolled in Ml 265, Clinic VI (fall), and Ml 275, 

Clinic VII (spring). 

Clinical Placement/Experience 

To be eligible for clinical placement, a student must have completed all prerequisite courses 
that apply toward the major and meet the minimum stated overall and major GPA for program 
retention. Once a student is selected for placement in a clinical education center, the complete 



140 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



set of the policies and procedures as published in the program relating to the clinic is expected 
to be read thoroughly by each student and will be reviewed by clinical faculty prior to the start 
of the clinical experience. Placements are determined by the clinical coordinator and program 
director. 

Students are required to provide their own transportation to and from the clinical education 
centers. Misericordia University is currently affiliated with the following clinical education 
centers: 



Center for Diagnostic Imaging (CDI), Forty Fort, Pennsylvania 
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township, Pennsylvania 
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Building, Plains Township, Pennsylvania 
Greater Hazleton Health Alliance, Hazleton, Pennsylvania 
Hazleton Health & Wellness Center-Advanced Imaging- Hazleton, Pennsylvania 
Marian Community Hospital, Carbondale, Pennsylvania* 
Mercy Health Partners, Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Professional Orthopedic Associates, Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Tyler Memorial Hospital, Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania 
Veteran's Administration Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Viewmont Medical Services, Scranton, Pennsylvania 
Vision Imaging of Kingston, Kingston, Pennsylvania 
Wilkes-Barre Imaging Center, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
Additional clinical education centers available to students during their senior year are: 

Advanced Imaging Specialists, Dunmore, Pennsylvania 

Cancer Center of Wyoming Valley, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 

Chiavacci Orthopedics, PC, Old Forge, Pennsylvania* 

Community Medical Center, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Hazleton MRI Dessen Center, Hazleton, Pennsylvania 

Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania (Limited basis based on CI availability)" 

Northeast Radiation Oncology Centers (NROC), Dunmore and Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Northeastern Pennsylvania Imaging Center (NEPIC), Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Professional Radiation Oncology Partners/Prime Med Imaging, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Radiation Medicine Specialists, Forty Fort, Pennsylvania 

Valley Advanced Imaging & MRI- Easton, Pennsylvania 

Wyoming Valley Health Care System, Inc., General Campus, Wilkes-Barre, 
Pennsylvania 

Wyoming Valley Health Care System, Inc., Saxton Pavilion, Edwardsville, Pennsylvania 

Wyoming Valley Imaging Center, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania* 

inactive Sites 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 141 



Health Examination 

Before students can begin the clinical experience, they must submit a health clearance form 
report to the director of student health services each year they are enrolled in a clinical 
experience. A complete list of required exams and immunizations will be provided to all 
medical imaging majors in the summer prior to their first clinical rotation. 

The health clearance form must be submitted to the director of student health services of 
Misericordia University by the student and as one complete packet no later than the date 
specified in correspondence by the department chair. Normal results are good for one year 
from the date of test. 

Special Expenses 

In addition to tuition and fees, expenses for the medical imaging major may include CPR 
certification and re-certification, malpractice liability insurance, uniforms, American Registry 
Examination fee, health examination fees, immunization fees, and fee for criminal record 
check (Act 34). A fee will be charged to the student's bill for the sophomore year to cover the 
cost of: image identification markers; name tag; radiation badges; student handbooks; log 
book; and malpractice insurance. In the junior and senior years, a fee will be charged for 
malpractice insurance and radiation badges. Additional expense incurred, such as fee for Act 
34 or American Registry Examination, are paid directly by the student to the respective 
agency. 

Admission, Retention, and Graduation Requirements 

The following policies with respect to retention, promotion, graduation, probation, and 
dismissal supersede any policy statements and/or information set forth in previous University 
catalogs. 

Admission to Medical Imaging 

A candidate who wants to be considered for the medical imaging program must meet the 
university's general admissions requirements. In addition, a student applying for admission 
should also have completed at least three years of high school mathematics and one year of 
biology, achieving a minimum grade of "C" in each course. Chemistry and physics are 
recommended but not required. A minimum combined SAT score of 900 (math and verbal) is 
required. The statement regarding the program's essential functions, pregnancy policy, and 
American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) exam eligibility policy will be sent to all 
accepted students. 

For external transfer students and present Misericordia students wishing to change majors, 
advanced placement at the sophomore program level may be considered: providing clinical 
space is available; the student has a minimum GPA of 2.75; has earned a minimum of 24 
credits that apply toward the major; and all pre-admission criteria have been met, including 
BIO 121 and BIO 122, or equivalent with a minimum grade of "C-" if taken at Misericordia 
University. 

Off-campus courses require a minimum grade of "C" to transfer, per university policy. 

Re ten t ion 

First-Year Program Level Students 

Cumulative GPA of 2.3 at the end of the spring semester. Students will be placed on program 
probation at the end of the fall semester if the minimum 2.3 has not been met and must meet 
the requirement upon completion of the spring semester. Minimum grade of "C-" in Ml 101, 
and BIO 121 and BIO 122 or BIO 211/212 taken at this level. 



142 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Program Level Students 

Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.3 both overall and also in the major (based on Ml coded 
courses) at the end of each semester. A minimum grade of "C-" in all Ml coded courses, BIO 
121, BIO 122, PHY 117, and PHY 118. Students will be placed on program probation for the 
following semester if the GPA requirement is not met. Students must meet the GPA 
requirement by the end of the next semester (fall/spring) to be retained in the major. Once the 
GPA is met and the student is off probation, the GPA cannot fall below the stated minimum. A 
student can only be on program probation one time. Students will be dismissed from the 
program if the minimum grade of "C-" is not earned in all Ml courses, PHY 1 1 7 and PHY 1 18, 
and BIO 121 and BIO 122 or approved equivalent. 

Additional Retention Requirements: 

a. Submission of CPR certification to the clinical coordinator prior to the start of clinic 
and re-certification prior to expiration as long as the student is enrolled in a clinical 
experience. The student is responsible for attending to expiration dates. 

b. Submission of the health clearance form to the director of student health services 
which confirms the student's ability to successfully fulfill all program requirements. 
This is required yearly. 

c. Yearly submission of results of Criminal Record Check (Act 34) to the program 
director. 

d. Documentation of HIPAA education prior to Clinic I. 
Note: A.-C. above must be kept current throughout the program. 

Graduation Requirements: 

GPA of 2.3, as well as in the major courses, minimum of 125 credits, depending on the track 
chosen, a score at or above 74 percent on the assessment test administered in Ml 415, Senior 
Seminar, and satisfactory completion of all university requirements (both financial and 
academic). 

Probation 

The student will be placed on program probation for the following semester if any one of the 
following occurs: 

a. The required grade point average is below the stipulated requirement. 

b. The student does not attain a score at or above the stipulated percentage on the 
assessment test administered in Ml 415. 

The student will be placed on immediate probation if a recorded violation of the code of ethics 
occurs at any time. The code of ethics can be found in the program clinical education manual 
and student handbook. 

The student will be removed from program probation when: 

a. The stipulated cumulative grade point average is achieved, providing it is by the 
completion of the following semester. 

b. The terms of probation are met. 

Students can be placed on program probation only one time. 

Dismissal 

Dismissal of the student from the medical imaging program will result if any one of the 
following occurs: 

a. The student commits a "serious" infraction of the code of ethics, or violates a 
program policy that states program dismissal (see individual program policies). 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 143 



b. The student fails to meet the terms of probation. 

c. The student does not earn a grade of "C-" or above in all medical imaging courses 
(any course with a Ml code), as well as BIO 121 and BIO 122 and PHY 1 17 and 
PHY 118 (If taken off-campus, a minimum grade of "C" is required). 

If a student is dismissed a second time, he or she will not be re-admitted. 



Re-admission 

Once a student is dismissed from the medical imaging program, he or she may apply for re- 
admission for the following year. This is due to the sequential nature of the curricula. The 
student has the opportunity to submit a letter of intent to the department chair for re-admission 
into the program no later than the end of the semester following the semester in which the 
student was dismissed. The request will be presented to the full-time medical imaging faculty 
for consideration providing the following criteria are met: an achieved overall GPA of 2.75; 
successful completion of all criteria that were the reason(s) for the initial dismissal; and the 
provision that clinical space is available. Once re-admitted, minimum GPA requirements apply 
and the student cannot be placed on probation again. 

In addition, students who wish to be considered for re-admission must first grade-replace all 
Ml and/or science courses in which a grade of "C-" or above was not earned. Previous 
performance in both clinical and didactic courses will also be considered. Notification of re- 
acceptance will be in writing from the department chair prior to June 1 for the fall semester, or 
January 1, depending upon what semester this student is re-entering. 

Depending upon the reason for the original dismissal as well as the length of time until the 
student re-enters, students may be required to audit specific program and/or cognate courses 
previously completed as a stipulation for re-admission. These courses can only be taken as 
audit and cannot earn credits if successfully taken previously. The requirements for re- 
admission will be determined by the full-time program faculty and communicated to the student 
in writing for consideration of acceptance of the re-admission offer. Failure by the student to 
agree to the conditions for re-admission will result in the offer being revoked. In addition, all 
re-admitted students must successfully repeat all previously completed clinical competencies 
on a pass/fail basis only. If re-admission is granted, minimum GPA requirements, as stated 
above, apply. In addition, if a student is required to audit lab courses, a fee for monthly 
radiation badges will be the responsibility of the student. 

The medical imaging department reserves the right to make changes in these policies as the 
need arises. 

Medical Imaging Major, General Program 

Class of 2012 and Beyond 
Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 






First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


BIO 121 


Human Structure & 
Function I 


4 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 3 
Technology 


ENG 


Core Elective 


3 


BIO 122 


Human Structure & 4 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 


3 




Function II 


Ml 100 


Intro to Medical Imaging 


2 


ENG 


Core Elective 3 


MTH 


Math Core (Bank I) 


3 


HIS/PS 
MTH 115 


Core Elective 3 
Statistics 3 



1 44 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Sophomore 


Year 








First Semester 


Total Credits 14 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


HP 999 


CPR Certification 





PHY 117/717 


Physics Introduction I 4 


PHL 100 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


Ml 114/714 


Rad. Procedures II 4 


Ml 106 


Medical Terminology 


1 


Ml 126/726 


Rad. Exposure & 2 


Ml 112 


Methods of Patient Care 


2 




Processing II 


Ml 113/713 


Radiographic 


4 


Ml 140 


Clinic I (T,R) 2 




Procedures I 




Ml 206/706 


Diagnostic 2 


Ml 125/725 


Rad. Exposure & 


3 




Assessment 




Processing I 




Ml 252 


Rad. Image 1 


Ml 251 


Rad. Image Evaluation I 


1 




Evaluation II 




Summer Term A- 


-6 wks. Total Credits 2 




Ml 160 Cli 


nic II 


(40 hours per week 






Monday-Friday) 




Junior Year 










First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


PSY 123 


Intro to Psych (CPSSS 


3 


HP410or 


Intro to Research 3 




Core) 




PSY 232 


Research Methods 


PHY 118/718 


Physics Introduction II 


4 


Ml 220/721 


Rad. Physics 2 


Ml 214 


Rad. Biology and 


2 


Ml 245 


Clinic IV (M.W.F) 3 




Protection 




Ml 290 


Intro, to Cross-Sectional 2 


Ml 221 


Special Procedures 


2 




Anatomy 


Ml 225 


Clinic III (T,R) 


2 


Ml 305 


Advanced Medical 2 


Ml 253 


Imaging Pathology 


2 


Ml 450/750 
******* 


Imaging 

Quality Management in 2 

Medical Imaging 

Free Elective 3 



Summer Term B-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 260 Clinic V (40 hours per week 

Monday-Friday) 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 14 


HP 999 


CPR Recertification 





Core 


Behavioral Science Core 3 


PHL 223 


Social Ethics 


3 




Elective 


or 102 


or Intro to Ethics 




Ml 275 


Clinic VII (T,R) 2 


FA 


Core Elective 


3 




(Internship Option) 


Ml 265 


Clinic VI (M,W) (internship Option) 


2 


Ml 415 


Senior Seminar 


Ml 400 


Issues in Medical lmaging( 

First 7 weeks) 


1 




(First 7 weeks - May grads 
only) 


MI415 


Senior Seminar 





RLS 


Core Elective 3 




(Last 7 weeks - Dec. grads only) 




FA 


Core Elective 3 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 


******* 


Free Elective 3 


******* 


Free Elective 


3 


Total required for graduation 125 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 145 



Medical Imaging Major, Management Minor 

18 Credits 

Medical Imaging Management Minor 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



Class of 2012 and Beyond 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


BIO 121 


Human Structure & 
Function I 


4 


BIO 122 


Human Structure & 4 
Function II 


ENG 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Core Elective 3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 3 


MTH 


Math Core (Bank I) 


3 


MTH 115 


Statistics (Core) 3 


Ml 100 


Introduction to Medical 
Imaging 


2 


PSY123 


Intro, to Psychology 3 
(CPSSS Core) 


Sophomore Year 








First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


HP 999 


CPR Certification 





PHY 117/717 


Physics Introduction I 4 


BUS 208 


Principles of 
Management 


3 


Ml 114/714 


Radiographic 4 
Procedures II 


Ml 106 


Medical Terminology 


1 


Ml 126/726 


Rad. Exposure & 2 


Ml 112 


Methods of Patient Care 


2 




Processing II 


Ml 113/713 


Rad. Procedures I 


4 


Ml 140 


Clinic I (T,R) 2 


Ml 125/725 


Rad. Exposure & 


3 


Ml 206/706 


Diagnostic Assessment 2 




Processing I 




Ml 252 


Rad. Image Evaluation II 1 


Ml 251 


Rad. Image Evaluation I 


1 






BUS 105 


Basic Computer 
Technology 


3 







Summer Term A-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 160 Clinic II (40 hours per week Monday- 
Friday) 



Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


PHY 11 8/71 £ 


I Physics Introduction II 


4 


RLS 


Core Elective 3 


PSY 232 


Intro to Research 


3 


PHL100 


Intro to Philosophy 3 


orHP410 






Ml 220/721 


Radiation Physics 2 


Ml 214 


Rad. Bio and Protection 


2 


Ml 245 


Clinic IV (M.W.F) 3 


Ml 221 


Special Procedures 


2 


Ml 290 


Intro, to Cross-Sectional 2 


Ml 225 


Clinic III (T,R) 


2 




Anatomy 


Ml 253 


Imaging Pathology 


2 


Ml 305 
Ml 450/750 


Advanced Medical 2 

Imaging 

Quality Management in 2 

Medical Imaging 



146 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Summer Term B-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 260 Clinic V (40 hours per week Monday- 

Friday) 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HP 999 


CPR Recertification 





BUS 420 


Small Business 


3 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting* 


3 




Management* 




BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics* 


3 


BUS 306 


Organizational Behavior* 


3 




(also CPSSS Core) 




FA 


Core Elective 


3 


BUS 360 


Mgt. of Human Resources* 


3 


PHL223 


Social Ethics or Intro to 


3 


FA 


Core Elective 


3 


or 102 


Ethics 




Ml 265 


Clinic VI (M,W) 


2 


RLS 


Core Elective 


3 




(Internship) 




Ml 275 


Clinic VII (T, R) (Internship) 


2 


Ml 400 


Issues in Medical Imaging 
(First 7 weeks) 


1 


MI415 


Senior Seminar 

(First 7 weeks — May grads 

only) 





Ml 415 


Senior Seminar 











(last 7 weeks — Dec. grads 




Total required for graduation 131 credits 






only) 











Medical Imaging Major, Master's Degree - Organizational Management 

Class of 2012 and Beyond 



Human Resources Specialization 

119 credits Medical Imaging (undergraduate) 



36 credits (graduate) = 155 TOTAL CREDITS 



Note: The OM courses as listed are only a suggestion. Consult OM section of catalog for 
sequence and frequency of course offerings. 

Medical Imaging Human Resources Specialization Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 6 


BIO 121 


Human Structure & 
Function I 


4 


BIO 122 


Human Structure and 4 
Function II 


ENG 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Core Elective 3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 3 


Ml 100 


Intro to Medical Imaging 


2 


MTH 115 


Statistics (Core) 3 


MTH 


Math Core (Bank I) 


3 


PSY123 


Intro to Psych (CPSSS 3 
Core) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 47 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


HP 999 


CPR Certification 




PHY 117 


Physics Introduction I 4 


BUS 208 


Principles of 


3 


Ml 114/714 


Rad. Procedures II 4 




Management 




Ml 126/726 


Rad. Exposure & 2 


Ml 106 


Medical Terminology 


1 




Processing II 


Ml 112 


Methods of Patient Care 


2 


Ml 140 


Clinic I (T, R) 2 


Ml 113/713 


Rad. Procedures I 


4 


Ml 206/706 


Diagnostic Assessment 2 


Ml 125/725 


Rad. Exposure & 
Processing I 


3 


Ml 252 


Rad. Image Evaluation II 1 


Ml 251 


Rad. Image Evaluation I 


1 






BUS 105 


Basic Computer 
Technology 


3 







Summer Term A-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 160 Clinic II (40 hours per week 
Monday-Friday) 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

OM515 Research Methods 3 





(Core) 




Ml 


Rad. Physics 


2 


PHY 


Physics Introduction II 


4 


220/721 






118/718 






Ml 245 


Clinic IV (M W F) 


3 


Ml 214 


Rad. Bio & Protection 


2 


Ml 290 


Intro to Cross-Sectional 


2 


Ml 221 


Special Procedures 


2 




Anatomy 




Ml 225 


Clinic III (T R) 


2 


Ml 305 


Advanced Medical Imaging 


2 


Ml 253 


Imaging Pathology 


2 


Ml 
450/750 


Quality Management in 
Med. Imaging 


2 








RLS 


Core Elective 


3 



Summer Term B-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 260 Clinic V (40 hours per week 
Monday-Friday) 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HP 999 


CPR Re-certification 




BUS 420 


Small Business Mgt 3 


PHL100 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


FA 


Core Elective 3 


Ml 265 


Clinic VI (M,W)(lnternship) 


2 


Ml 275 


Clinic VII (T,R) 2 


Ml 400 


Issues in Medical Imaging 


1 




(Internship Option) 




(first 7 wks) 




Ml 415 


Senior Seminar 


MI415 


Senior Seminar 







(first 7 wks-May grads) 




(last 7 weeks - Dec. Grads only) 




OM551 


Organizational 3 


OM509 


Financial Management 


3 




Communication 


OM500 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


RLS 


Core Elective 3 


FA 


Core Elective 


3 


PHL223 
or 102 


Social Ethics or Intro to 3 
Ethics 



1 48 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Master's Degree-Organizational Management 

(Management Specialization) 

119 credits medical imaging (undergraduate) + 36 credits (graduate) = 155 TOTAL CREDITS 

Note: The OM courses as listed are only a suggestion. Consult OM section of catalog for 
sequence and frequency of course offerings. 

Master's Degree-Organizational Management, Management Specialization 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


BIO 121 


Human Structure & 
Function I 


4 


BIO 122 


Human Structure & 4 
Function II 


ENG 


Core Elective 


3 


ENG 


Core Elective 3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 


3 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 3 


Ml 100 


Intro to Medical Imaging 


2 


MTH 115 


Statistics (Core) 3 


MTH 


Math Core (Bank I) 


3 


PSY123 


Intro to Psych 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

HP 999 CPR Certification 

BUS 208 Principles of 

Management 
BUS 105 Basic Computer 

Technology 
Ml 106 Medical Terminology 

Ml 1 12 Methods of Patient Care 

Ml 113/713 Rad. Procedures I 
Ml 125/725 Rad. Exposure & 

Processing I 
Ml 251 Rad. Image Evaluation I 1 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

PHY 117 Physics Introduction I 4 

Rad. Procedures II 4 

Rad. Exposure & 2 
Processing II 

Clinic I (T, R) 2 

Diagnostic Assessment 2 

Rad. Image Evaluation II 1 



3 


Ml 114/714 




Ml 126/726 


3 






Ml 140 


1 


Ml 206/706 


2 


Ml 252 


4 




3 







Summer Term A 


- 6 wks. 




Total Credits 2 




Ml 160 Clinic II 


(40 hours per week Monday-Friday) 


Junior Year 










First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


BUS 207 


Contemporary 


3 


OM515 


Research Methods 3 




Economics (CPSSS Core) 




Ml 220/721 


Rad. Physics 2 


PHY118 


Physics Introduction II 


4 


Ml 245 


Clinic IV (M, W, F) 3 


Ml 214 


Rad. Bio & Protection 


2 


Ml 290 


Intro to Cross-Sectional 2 


Ml 221 


Special Procedures 


2 




Anatomy 


Ml 225 


Clinic III (T, R) 


2 


Ml 305 


Advanced Medical Img 2 


Ml 253 


Imaging Pathology 


2 


Ml 450/750 
RLS 


Quality Mgt in Med Img 2 
Core Elective 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 149 



Summer Term B - 6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Ml 260 Clinic V (40 hours per week Monday-Friday) 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HP 999 


CPR Re-certification 





BUS 420 


Small Business 3 


PHL100 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 




Management 


Ml 265 


Clinic VI (M,W) (Internship 


2 


FA 


Core Elective 3 




Option) 




Ml 275 


Clinic VII (T, R)(intemship 2 


Ml 400 


Issues in Medical Imaging 


1 




option) 




(first 7 wks) 




Ml 415 


Senior Seminar (first 7 


Ml 415 


Senior Seminar (last 7 







wks-May grads) 




weeks - Dec. grads only) 




OM551 


Organizational 3 


OM509 


Financial Management 


3 




Communication 


OM500 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


PHL 223 


Social Ethics or Intro to 3 


FA 


Core Elective 


3 


or 102 
RLS 


Ethics 

Core Elective 3 



Total required for graduation 131 credits 



Master's Degree-Organizational Management (Management Specialization) 

NOTE: Students may complete the M.S. Degree by the end of the 5th academic year through 
a variety of scheduling formats such as weekend, online, or the traditional evening format. 
Students will need to work closely with their graduate academic advisor in order to complete 
this degree within a 5-year time frame that will include summer classes between the 4th and 
5th years. Students may take longer to complete this degree depending on their preferred 
format and availability of classes. An example of a course sequence, in order to complete the 
degree within 5 academic years includes: Summer- OM 535, 545, 586; Fall- OM 520 and 530; 
Spring- OM 536, 538, and an Elective. (OM 520 and 536 are choices within the required 6 cr. 
Specialization courses. OM 533 may be taken in place of either 520 or 536). 

Required During Undergraduate: (12 credits) 

OM 500 Organizational Behavior 

OM 509 Financial Management 

OM515 Research Methods 

OM 551 Organizational Communication 

Required during Fifth Year: (18 credits) 

OM 530 Legal Aspects of Administration 

OM 535 Leadership 

OM 538 Perspectives in Management 

OM 545 Intro, to Human Resource Management 

OM 586 Strategic Planning 

Elective Choose any graduate level course 

AND 
* Specialization, Management: (6 credits) Choose two: 

OM 520 Intro to Management Info Systems 
OM 533 Managing Customer Satisfaction 
OM 536 Marketing Management 



1 50 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Medical Imaging Major 

Combined BS General Track/Certificate Diagnostic Medical Sonography 
Class of 2012 and Beyond 

Medical Imaging Major, Combined BS General Track/Certificate Diagnostic 
Medical Sonography 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits16 


BIO 121 


Human Structure & 
Function I 


4 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 3 
Technology 


ENG 


Core Elective 


3 


BIO 122 


Human Structure & 4 


HIS/PS 


Core Elective 


3 




Function II 


Ml 100 


Intro to Medical Imaging 


2 


ENG 


Core Elective 3 


MTH 


Math Core (Bank I) 


3 


HIS/PS 
MTH 115 


Core Elective 3 
Statistics (Core) 3 


Sophomore Year 








First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 


HP 999 


CPR Certification 




PHY 117/717 


Physics Introduction I 4 


PHL100 


Intro to Philosophy 


3 


Ml 114/714 


Rad. Procedures II 4 


Ml 106 


Medical Terminology 


1 


Ml 126/726 


Rad. Exposure & 2 


Ml 112 


Methods of Patient Care 


2 




Processing II 


Ml 113/713 


Rad. Procedures I 


4 


Ml 140 


Clinic I (T, R) 2 


Ml 125/725 


Rad. Exposure & 
Processing I 


3 


Ml 206/706 


Diagnostic 2 
Assessment 


Ml 251 


Rad. Image Evaluation I 


1 


Ml 252 


Rad. Image Evaluation 1 


Core 


CPSSS Core Elective 


3 


RLS 


II 

Core Elective 3 




Summer Term A- 


-6 wks. 


Total Credits 2 




Ml 160 Clinic I (40 hours per week Monday-Friday) 


Junior Year 









First Semest 


E?r Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


FA 


Core Elective 


3 


HP 410 or 


Intro to Research or 3 


PSY123 


Intro to Psych (CPSSS 


3 


PSY 232 


Research Methods 




Core) 




Ml 220/721 


Rad. Physics 2 


PHY 118/718 


Physics Introduction II 


4 


Ml 245 


Clinic IV (M, W, F) 3 


Ml 214 


Rad. Biology and 
Protection 


2 


Ml 290 


Intro to Cross-Sectional 2 
Anatomy 


Ml 221 


Special Procedures 


2 


Ml 305 


Advanced Medical Img 2 


Ml 225 


Clinic III (T, R) 


2 


Ml 450/750 


Quality Mgt in Medical 2 


Ml 253 


Imaging Pathology 


2 


FA 


Img 

Core Elective 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 51 



Summer 
Ml 260 



Term B-6 wks. Total Credits 2 

Clinic V (40 hours per week Monday-Friday) 



Senior Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

2 



HP 999 


CPR Recodification 




DMS 


Clinical Sonography I 


DMS 


Introduction to Sonography 


3 


130# 


(begins March) 


100 






DMS 


Abdominal Sonography 


DMS 


U.S. Physics and 


3 


115 




105 


Instrumentation 




DMS 


Pelvic Sonography 


DMS 


Sonographic Cross-Sect. 


3 


120 




110 


Anatomy 




DMS 


Small Parts Sonography 


Ml 265 


Clinic VI (M,W) (Internship) 


2 


125 




MI415 


Senior Seminar 





Ml 415 


Senior Seminar 

(First 7 weeks - May grads only) 




(Last 7 weeks - Dec. grads only) 




RLS 


Core Elective (Term A) 


PHL223 


Social Ethics or 


3 






or 102 


Intro to Ethics 









Ml 400 Issues in Medical Imaging 1 
(First 7 weeks) 



Total credits required for graduation (BS, 
Medical Imaging) 134 (20 credits toward 
DMS certificate) 



* Senior year of B.S. -Medical Imaging overlaps with Sessions I and II of DMS Certificate. 

# DMS 130 (Clinical Sonography I) is an equivalent course for Ml 275. 
Note: DMS courses will be taught on alternating weekends. 

Master's Degree-Organizational Management 

(Human Resources Specialization*) 

24 additional credits required to complete the M.S. degree 

NOTE: Students may complete the M.S. degree by the end of the 5th academic year through a 
variety of scheduling formats such as weekend, online, or the traditional evening format. 
Students will need to work closely with their graduate academic advisor in order to complete 
this degree within a 5-year time frame that will include summer classes between the 4th and 
5th year. Students may take longer to complete this degree depending on their preferred 
format and availability of classes. An example of a course sequence, in order to complete the 
degree within 5 academic years, which can be done on campus in the evenings includes: 
Summer-OM 545, 586; Fall-OM 527, 530, Elective; Spring- OM 538, 552, 557. (OM 527 and 
557 are choices within the requirements for the *Specialization in HR. OM 558 may be taken in 
place of either OM 527 or 557). 

Required During Undergraduate: (12 credits) 

OM 500 Organizational Behavior 

OM 509 Financial Management 

OM515 Research Methods 

OM 551 Organizational Communication 



1 52 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Required During Fifth Year: (18 credits) 

OM 530 Legal Aspects of Administration 

OM 552 Regulation of Human Resource Management 

OM 538 Perspectives in Management 

OM 545 Intro, to Human Resource Management 

OM 586 Strategic Planning 

Elective Choose any graduate level course 
AND 

*Human Resources Specialization: (6 credits) 
Choose Two: 

OM 527 Selection, Recruitment, and Training & Development 
OM 557 Performance, Compensation, and Reward Systems 
OM 558 Employee Relations and Services 



Medical Imaging Major, Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate 

Program Director Sheryl Goss, MS, RT, (R), RDMS, RDCS, RVT 

In order to pursue the combined bachelor of science in medical imaging/certificate in 
diagnostic medical sonography (DMS), students must meet the stated requirements for 
admission to the DMS certificate program (see section on Diagnostic Medical Sonography). In 
addition, students must meet with the sonography program director and submit an application 
prior to the fall, mid-semester of the junior year. Commitment to the DMS program must be 
given to both advisors, in writing, during the first week of the spring semester, junior year. In 
consideration of the combination of the Ml major and DMS course loads, students must 
possess a minimum GPA in the medical imaging major courses of 2.7 in order to pursue this 
dual track. If not admitted at this point, students may re-apply upon completion of their B.S. in 
medical imaging. 

Students may complete both the B.S. in medical imaging and the DMS Certificate in less than 
5 academic years following this sequence. Please note sessions III through VI are part time 
credit load. For example, students entering as first year in Fall, 2007, can complete both by 
the end of March, 2012. This will result in the student (already possessing the professional 
A.R.R.T. credential) being registry-eligible and will enable them to sit for the national exam 
administered by the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS). Upon 
successful completion of the examination, the student will earn the professional credential of 
Registered Diagnostic Medical Sonographer (RDMS). The student will then hold the 
professional credential of: Mary Smith, BS, RT (R), RDMS. 

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate 

Sequence of Required Courses 



Session III 
Summer I 
DMS 135 
DMS 145 

DMS 140 



Total Credits 8 
Obstetrical Sonography I 3 

Fetal and Neonatal 3 

Anomalies* 
Clinical Sonography II 2 



Session IV 
Summer II 
DMS 250 
DMS 145 

DMS 255 



Total Credits 5 



Obstetrical Sonography 
Fetal and Neonatal 
Anomalies* (continued 
from Session III) 
Clinical Sonography III 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 53 



Session V 






Session VI 




Fall 


Total Credits 9 


Spring (ends 


in March) Total Credits 6 


DMS 260 


Intro to Vascular 
Sonography 


3 


DMS 295 


Comprehensive 3 
Registry Review 


DMS 275 


Interventional 


1 


DMS 300 


Clinical Sonography V 2 




Sonography 




DMS 280 


Issues in Sonography 1 


DMS 285 


Journal and Case Study 


1 


Total credits 


in DMS program 48 




Review 




Total combined credits 162 


DMS 290 


Clinical Sonography IV 


4 







See Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate Course Descriptions, page 300. 

* Fetal and Neonatal Anomalies runs for the entire 14 weeks, encompassing Session III and 
IV. Credits assigned in Session III. 



Medical Imaging Course Descriptions (Ml) 

100 Introduction to Medical Imaging 2 credit 

This introduction to the medical imaging profession includes the historical development 
as well as specialties within the fields, organizational structure of hospital departments, 
and opportunities for professional growth. The profession is examined in order to assist 
the student in making a commitment to pursue this field. Lecture: 2 hour 

Fall, Spring (as needed) 

104 Medical Terminology I (Web-based) 1 credit 
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the medical 
vocabulary necessary for work in health-related fields. It covers the basic techniques of 
medical word building followed by medical terms relating to body structure, 
integumentary, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, blood, lymph, and immune 
systems. No previous knowledge of anatomy, physiology, or pathology is necessary. 

105 Medical Terminology II (Web-based) 1 credit 
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the medical 
vocabulary necessary for work in health-related fields. It covers the basic techniques of 
medical work building followed by medical terms relating to musculoskeletal, 
genitourinary, female reproductive, endocrine and nervous system, and special senses. 
No previous knowledge of anatomy, physiology or pathology is necessary. 

106 Medical Terminology 1 credit 
Anatomical names of bones and organs of the body and other descriptive terms and 
their common abbreviations; prefixes and suffixes, proper usage, spelling, and 
interpretation of terms. Lecture: 1 hour 

Fall only (online) 

1 1 2 Methods of Patient Care 2 credits 

Communication, asepsis, body mechanics, vital signs, emergencies, drug administration, 
and isolation technique. Lecture: 2 hours 

Fall only 



1 54 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



1 13/713Radiographic Procedures I (Lab) 4 credits 

This course is designed to develop preclinical competency in specific diagnostic 
procedures through a combination of lecture and laboratory. It is an introduction to basic 
theory and principles of radiographic procedures of the upper and lower limbs, bony 
thorax, chest, and vertebral column. 

Prerequisite: BIO 121 or permission of instructor. Fall only 

114/714Radiographic Procedures II (Lab) 4 credits 

This course is designed to develop preclinical competency in specific diagnostic 
procedures through a combination of lecture and laboratory. It is a continuation of 
Radiographic Procedures I, emphasizing theory and principles of radiographic 
examinations of the abdomen, gastrointestinal system, biliary tract, urinary system, and 
cranium. 

Prerequisite: Ml 113; Prerequisite: BIO 122 or equivalent Spring only 

125/725Principles of Radiographic Exposure and Film Processing I (Lab) 3 credits 

Elements of x-ray production. Emphasis on factors affecting production of an acceptable 
diagnostic radiograph: contrast, density, recorded detail, and visibility of detail. 

Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 2 hours. Fall only 

126/726Principles of Radiographic Exposure and Film Processing II (Lab) 2 credits 
Continuation of Ml 125. Further study of theories and factors affecting production of a 
quality radiograph inclusive of processing. 
Lecture: 2 hours Laboratory: 1 hour 

Prerequisite: Ml 125. Spring only 

140 Clinical Experience I 2 credits 

Orientation to the clinical setting including rotations through out-patient facilities and 
operating room within the hospital. Equipment familiarization, application of theoretical 
principles through examination of patients under direct supervision. Four evening 
rotations: 3-10 pm. within the semester. 16 hours per week. 

Prerequisites: Ml 113, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. HIPAA education. 
Spring only 

160 Clinical Experience II 2 credits 

Continuation of Ml 140. Experience in perfecting the application of ionizing radiation 
under supervision. Clinical experience in a hospital setting including 
diagnostic/fluoroscopic, portable and operating room rotations in addition to evening 
hours, weekend hours, and outpatient rotation. Five evening rotations (3-10 pm.) plus 
one weekend (Saturday and Sunday day shift). 40 hours per weeks. 

Prerequisites: Ml 140, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. Summer Term A 
(May-June, 6 weeks) 

206/706Diagnostic Assessment (Lab) 2 credits 

Through a combination of lecture and lab, this course is designed to provide student 
education and development of skills in patient assessment. Advanced patient care topics 
such as venipuncture and contrast media administration, performance and analysis of 
EKG, history taking, and pharmacology are covered. 

Prerequisite: Ml 112 or permission of instructor. Spring only 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 55 



214 Radiation Biology and Protection 2 credits 

A study of the effects of ionizing radiation on living matter; changes in the biochemistry, 
micro and macro-morphology, genetics, and embryology which are produced by ionizing 
radiation in order to fully understand topics such as patient protection, personnel 
protection, maximum permissible dose, and exposure monitoring. 

Prerequisite: Ml 160. Fall only 

220/721 Radiographic Physics and Equipment (Lab) 2 credits 

This course explores the fundamentals of x-ray properties, production of ionizing 
radiation and its interactions, x-ray circuitry, and equipment through a combination of 
lecture and laboratory. 

Prerequisite: PHY 107/108 or permission of instructor. Spring only 

221 Special Radiographic Procedures 2 credits 

This course deals with special radiographic procedures. Topics covered are procedures 
done in the general radiography department including, but not limited to, mammograms, 
arthrograms, and myelograms. Angiographic and interventional radiography as well as 
relaTed equipment are covered. Lecture: 2 hours 

Prerequisites: BIO 121/122, Ml 113/114. Fall only 

225 Clinical Experience III 2 credits 

Continuation of Ml 160, including rotation through out-patient facilities and operating 
room within the hospital. 1 6 hours per week. Four evening rotations (3-1 pm.) 

Prerequisites: Ml 160, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. Fall only 

245 Clinical Experience IV 3 credits 

Continuation of Ml 225. Practical application of theory and skills acquired in all phases of 
the curriculum. Three evening rotations- 3-10 pm. 24 hours per week. Rotations 
through Computed Tomography, Special Procedures, and three other advanced 
modalities of student's choice in preparation for senior year internship. 

Prerequisites: Ml 225, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. Spring only 

251 Radiographic Image Evaluation I 1 credit 
The course bridges the gap between patient positioning and the resulting image. This 
course will focus on radiographic evaluation of the upper and lower limbs, chest, bony 
thorax and vertebral column. 

Corequisite: Ml 113. Fall only 

252 Radiographic Image Evaluation II 1 credit 
This course is a continuation of Ml 251 , Radiographic Image Evaluation I. It will focus on 
radiographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal system, biliary tract, urinary system, 
cranial structures and operative procedures. 

Prerequisite: Ml 251. Spring only 



1 56 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



253 Imaging Pathology 2 credits 

This course will offer a foundation in the basic principles of pathology. The focus is on 
the appearances of diseases and injury diagnosed by medical imaging procedures. 
Etiology, treatment and prognosis will also be discussed. 

Prerequisite: Ml 252. Fall only 

260 Clinical Experience V 2 credits 

Final experience in the general radiography department to include indirect supervision in 
areas of demonstrated competency. 40 hours per week. Out-patient as well as five 
evening rotations (3-10 pm.). 

Prerequisites: Ml 245, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance.. Summer Term B 
(July-August) 6 weeks. 

265 Clinical Experience VI 2 credits 

Advanced practical application of theory and skills in specialty areas. 16 hours per week. 
Optional minor rotations or internship in specialty areas begin. 

Prerequisites: Ml 260, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. Fall only 

275 Clinical Experience VII 2 credits 

Continuation of Ml 265. 16 hours per week. Optional minor rotations or internship in 
specialty areas. Senior research project. 

Prerequisites: Ml 265, CPR certification, annual health examination, immunizations, 
current liability insurance, Act 34 criminal background clearance. Spring (May grads), 
Fall (December grads). 

290 Introduction to Cross-Sectional Anatomy for Radiographers 2 credits 

A general overview of cross-sectional anatomy as it applies to radiology. Emphasis on 
identifying anatomical structures as they relate to computed tomography (CT) and 
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lecture: 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Ml 221, BIO 121/122, or college level anatomy course. Spring only 

300 Cardiovascular Interventional Radiography 2 credits 

Advanced-level course for registry-eligible or registered radiographers. Focus of the 
course is cardiac catheterization, angiography, and interventional procedures. This 
course also provides instruction in the patient care and procedural techniques necessary 
to understand this highly complex area of imaging. Lecture: 2 hours 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level anatomy or professional certificate in a 
health science field. Fall only 

305 Advanced Medical Imaging 2 credits 

Students explore topics of advanced diagnostic imaging and therapeutic technologies. 
The focus includes specialized modalities such as computer fundamentals and 
applications, computed radiography (digital imaging), pediatric imaging, trauma imaging, 
mammography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 
nuclear imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), bone densitometry, sonography, 
and radiation oncology. The modalities will be presented in terms of history, indications, 
and procedures performed. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level anatomy or professional certificate in a 
health science field. Spring 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 57 



400 Issues in Medical Imaging 1 credit 

This course involves discussion of current issues relevant to medical imaging and their 
impact upon the profession. Topics include, but are not limited to mandatory vs. 
voluntary continuing education, licensure, multiskilling, regional vs. programmatic 
accreditation, and charting and documentation. 

Prerequisite: Senior level status or permission of instructor Fall (first seven weeks) 
only 

413 Medical Imaging Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. To be arranged. 

415 Senior Seminar credit 

This course assists students in preparation for the ARRT examination taken upon 
graduation. 

Prerequisite: Ml 260, must be an M.I. Major. Fall (December grads). Spring (May 
grads) 

450/750Quality Management in Medical Imaging Sciences (Lab) 2 credits 

Through lecture and lab, this course focuses on quality management and its associated 
topics of quality assurance and quality control as they relate to the field of medical 
imaging. Particular emphasis is on quality control which is the part of the overall program 
that deals with instrumentation and equipment. Methods used to test, evaluate and 
ensure radiographic quality are covered. 

Prerequisite: Ml 253. Spring only 

480 Special Topics in Medical Imaging 

Topics vary from semester to semester and are announced with pre-registration 
information. An example of courses offered include those in magnetic resonance 
imaging, CT scan, bone densitometry, and sonography. 



Nursing Major 

College of Health Sciences 

Degree BSN, Nursing 

Department Chair Cynthia Mailloux, PhD, RN 

Faculty 

Kathleen Gelso, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, BSN Villanova University, MSN College 
Misericordia 

Brenda Hage, Associate Professor of Nursing, BSN State Universiity of New York at Albany; MSN 
College Misericordia, PhD Virginia Commonwealth University 

Todd Hastings, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, BA Rutger's University; MS The 
Pennsylvania State University; MS Wilkes University 

Cynthia Mailloux, Chair - Associate Professor of Nursing, BSN Wilkes University; MSN College 
Misericordia; PhD The Pennsylvania State University 

Vanessa Mayorowski, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, BSN Marywood College; MSN 
College Misericordia 

Brenda Pavill, Associate Professor of Nursing, BS Wilkes College; MS Bloomsburg University; 
MSN College Misericordia; PhD Marywood University 



1 58 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Donna Ayers Snelson, Associate Professor of Nursing, BSNE Wilkes University; MSN University 
of Pennsylvania 

Jean R. Steelman, Professor of Nursing, BSNE Wilkes College; MSN College Misericordia; PhD 
New York University 

Christina Tomkins, Visiting Assistant Professor of Nursing, BSN, MSN Bloomsburg University 

Marion Villano, Assistant Professor of Nursing, BSN, MSN College Misericordia 

Annette Weiss, Assistant Professor of Nursing, BSN The Pennsylvania State University; MSN 
University of Hartford 

Philosophy 

The Department of Nursing at Misericordia University is an integral part of the College of 
Health Sciences. The nursing faculty supports the mission of the University and the principles 
of academic excellence, service leadership, and professional preparation which are 
components of the Trinity of Learning. The faculty is committed to providing quality education 
to its students, based on the values of mercy, service, justice, and hospitality. The beliefs 
serve as the foundation of the nursing curriculum. Faculty holds the following beliefs about 
persons, environment, health, and nursing. 

Persons. Persons are whole human beings, unique in their inherent worth and dignity. 
Persons function as autonomous agents characterized by the capacity for emotions, 
reasoning, and perceiving. 

Environment. Environment is the context in which persons exist. Environment is dynamic, 
multidimensional and reciprocal. 

Health. Health is experienced by persons as a dynamic state of being which results from a 
process of making choices over time. 

Nursing. Nursing is a learned profession based on its own theory and science. As a science, 
nursing focuses on research, information, and health care technology which are foundational 
to evidenced based practice. As a practice, nursing is concerned with the health and well 
being of persons as individuals, families, groups, communities, and the global society. 
Communication skills are an essential component of the nurse person relationship. Nurses 
support the active participation of persons in determining health care decisions. They are 
engaged in health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and illness and disease 
management which involve the shared responsibility of persons, health care providers and 
society. Nurses use critical thinking and the nursing process to design, provide, manage and 
coordinate care within the health care system. Ethical and legal principles guide the practice of 
professional nursing. 

The faculty further believes that teaching/learning is a co-creative process. Learning is a life 
long process that involves critical thinking and intellectual curiosity. Learning occurs when the 
student is an active participant in the learning process. Students share in the responsibility to 
achieve their highest potential. 

Teaching is viewed as an empowering process. Members of the faculty engage with diverse 
learners to achieve outcomes of the nursing program and promote educational mobility. 
Faculty enhances the teaching/learning process by maintaining current knowledge in the 
discipline of nursing and integrating research and service into nursing education. 

Undergraduate education in nursing cultivates higher order thinking skills through the 
integration of liberal arts and professional studies. The undergraduate nursing program 
prepares professional nurses for leadership roles in health care. Students are prepared as 
nurse generalists to assist people with managing an increasingly complex system of care. At 
the end of the curriculum students are prepared for graduate study in nursing. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 59 



Consistent with the mission of the university and its goals for graduate education, the nursing 
faculty believes that master's education in nursing builds on the skills of a baccalaureate 
nursing education. Master's nursing education has as its primary focus the advanced practice 
clinical role. Advanced practice nurses are educated to practice independently and 
interdependent^ in the role of health care providers. The faculty believes that the transition to 
the role of advance practice nurse occurs throughout the entire master's program and results 
in the preparation of a clinician who is able to provide a broad range of health care services 
that are directed toward the improvement of patient care outcomes. Finally, faculty believes 
that master's education in nursing provides the foundation for future doctoral study in nursing. 

The nursing faculty purport that graduate education assists students to acquire higher-order 
critical thinking and decision making skills. Advanced practice nurses are prepared to 
analyze, synthesize, and utilize research evidence to provide high quality health care, initiate 
change, and improve practice. As beginning clinicians, students must develop an 
understanding of health care policy, organization, and finance and use this knowledge to make 
cost-effective clinical decisions, to improve health care delivery, and to enhance outcomes of 
patient care. Master's nursing education promotes an understanding of the principles, 
personal values, and beliefs that provide a framework for the decision making and consultation 
processes which influence the interventions and care delivered by clinicians. Professional role 
development provides students with a clear understanding of the nursing profession, 
advanced practice nursing roles, and the requirements for, and regulation of, these roles. 
Master's nursing education exposes students to a broad range of nursing and related theories 
and facilitates the integration of appropriate theory in the development of comprehensive and 
holistic approaches to care. Advanced practice nursing students understand the wide diversity 
of sub-cultural influences on human behavior including ethnic, racial, gender, age and class 
differences and demonstrate this understanding in the delivery of culturally sensitive care. 
Clinicians prepared in an advanced practice nursing program develop a strong theoretical 
foundation in health promotion, illness prevention, disease management, and maintenance of 
function across the health/illness continuum. These clinicians generate and use expert 
teaching and coaching strategies to promote and preserve health and healthy life styles. 

Advanced practice nursing education requires additional core skills and knowledge to further 
support the role of clinician. Expert clinicians conduct comprehensive health assessments and 
physical examinations, using increasingly sophisticated communication and observational 
skills. They apply knowledge of system-focused, physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of 
disease as a basis for physical examination, diagnostic reasoning, decision making, and 
management of care. Knowledge of advanced pharmacology, including pharmacotherapeutics 
and pharmacokinetics of broad categories of pharmacologic agents, is essential to the 
clinician's selection of appropriate disease management and treatment modalities. Finally, 
advanced practice nursing students must have the opportunity to master knowledge of health 
care problems and to apply knowledge and skills in extensive clinical practice. 

Undergraduate Nursing Program 

Outcomes 

All graduates of the undergraduate nursing program will be able to: 

1. Incorporate science, theoretical and empirical knowledge from the liberal arts, basic 
sciences, and nursing to promote health, risk reduction, disease prevention, and, illness and 
disease management for the welfare of others. 

2. Utilize an evidence based approach in the delivery of health care to individuals, families, 
groups, and communities within the global society. 



1 60 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



3. Use critical thinking skills and the nursing process to design, provide, manage, and 
coordinate nursing care. 

4. Participate with patients and interdisciplinary team members to improve quality patient care. 

5. Incorporate knowledge of leadership management principles in professional role 
development. 

6. Provide safe, humanistic nursing care to patients in a variety of settings by demonstrating 
respect for patient rights, professionalism, and ethical decision-making. 

7. Demonstrate information literacy and utilization of healthcare technologies used to support 
the delivery of health care. 

Policies 

Policies specific to the nursing major are published in the undergraduate nursing student 
policy handbook. Each student is required to review the handbook online each academic year 
and submit the completed acceptance form to the nursing department secretary no later than 
the third week of the fall semester. 

Selection, Advancement, and Graduation Criteria 

Admission into Nursing 

Students admitted to nursing in the traditional nursing undergraduate program (first year) must 
meet the general admission requirements of Misericordia University in addition to program- 
specific requirements specified below. Full-time transfer students must meet admission 
requirements as specified in the transfer student section of this catalog. Non-traditional 
applicants, such as second degree students and registered nurse students, must meet specific 
requirements as outlined below and in the appropriate nursing student policy handbooks. All 
non-nursing transfer credits will be evaluated by the registrar and the nursing department chair 
(or designee) to determine equivalencies. 

Admission into undergraduate nursing requires: 

a. SAT scores of 900 with a minimum score of 450 in the math and verbal exams 

b. High school average of 80 or higher 

c. B or above in science and mathematics courses 

d. Completion of one year of chemistry, biology, and mathematics (including one 
semester of algebra). 



Admission into the second degree nursing program requires: 

a. Completed bachelor's degree 

b. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 

c. Completion of BIO 211, 212, 227, PSY 275, HP 241 (for full-time option only; in 
special circumstances, one or more of these courses can be completed as junior 
co-requisites with permission of the department chairperson). 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 161 



Admission for RN students (those holding an RN license) include: 

a. Graduation from an approved associate's degree or diploma nursing program; 
students are required to submit transcripts of all prior college-level course work and 
a copy of the RN license 

b. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 for all prior college-level course 
work 

c. Official written verification of a minimum of 1 ,000 hours of clinical practice in the 
past three years (waived for graduates of basic nursing programs in the three years 
prior to application). 

Note: Curriculum requirements may vary based on transcript evaluation. 

State Board Requirements 

The nursing department, in accordance with the State Board of Nurse Examiners, advises all 
nursing students that felonious acts prohibit licensure in Pennsylvania as of January 1 , 1997. 
The following is taken from the law. 

The Board shall not issue a license or certificate to an applicant who has been: 

1. Convicted* of a felonious act prohibited by the act of April 14, 1972 (P.L. 233, No. 64), 
known as "The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act", or 

• 2. Convicted* of a felony relating to a controlled substance in a court of law of the United 
States and any other state, territory or country unless: 

a. At least ten years have elapsed from the date of the conviction; 

b. The applicant satisfactorily demonstrates to the Board significant progress in 
personal rehabilitation since the conviction such that licensure should not create a 
substantial risk of harm to the health and safety of patients or the public or a 
substantial risk of further criminal violations, and 

c. The applicant otherwise satisfies the qualifications contained in this act. 

A person convicted of any felonious act may be prohibited from licensure by the Board of 
Nursing at any time. 

* Convicted includes a judgment, an admission of guilt, or a plea of no lo contendere. 

Special Expenses 

In addition to tuition and fees, expenses for the major includes CPR certification and 
recertification, malpractice liability insurance, uniforms, NCLEX examination fee, 
developmental testing fees, annual health examination and immunization fees, clinical lab 
supply kit, membership in the National Student Nurses Association, and field trip expenses. 

Transfer Students 

All non-nursing transfer college credits will be evaluated by the registrar and the nursing 
department to determine equivalencies. Related field AAS degree-holders will be required to 
complete either by direct transfer and/or completion of coursework at Misericordia University, 
at least one course in all core curriculum areas prior to graduation. 



1 62 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Traditional Undergraduate Nursing Program 
Normal Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Science Core 


3 




Science Core 3 


PSY 123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




English Core 3 




History/Political Science 


3 




History/Political Science 3 




Core 






Core 




English Core 


3 


PHL 100 


Introduction to Philosophy 3 


SOC 101 


Comparative Sociology 


3 


PSY 275 


Developmental Psychology 3 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology 4 

BIO 227 Bacteriology 4 

MTH 120 Math Reasoning 3 

HP 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

Philosophy Core 3 

Junior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

NSG 300 Conceptual Basis of 2 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology 4 

NSG 201 Foundations of Nursing 3 

MTH 115 Statistics 3 

Elective 3 

RLS Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

NSG 303 FHP Adult 11 6 





Professional Nursing 




NSG 304 


FHP Pediatric Nursing 


4 


NSG 301 
NSG 302 


FHP Adult 1 

FHP Psych-mental Health 


6 
4 


NSG 305 


Physical Assessment 
Religion Core 


3 
3 


HP 320 


Principles of 
Pharmacology Elective 


3 








Senior Year 










First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HP(NSG) 
410 


Intro, to Nursing 
Research 


3 


NSG 403 


FHP Aggregates and 
Populations 


4 


NSG 401 


FHP Adult 111 


5 


NSG 404 


FHP Adult IV 


4 


NSG 402 


FHP Child-bearing and 

Family 

FA Core 


4 
3 


NSG 405 


Baccalaureate Capstone 

FA Core 

Elective 


3 
3 
3 








Total required credits for graduation 126 
credits 





* May be taken either fall or spring. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 63 



Normal Sequence for Non-traditional Students 

Accelerated Registered Nurse Option: Expressway RN to BSN§ 

The Accelerated Expressway RN to BSN Program is designed for highly motivated registered 
nurses who want to earn their degree in a timely manner. Credits are earned through transfer, 
advanced placement, and matriculation. Advanced placement credits (32 credits) for course 
work completed in a state-approved, nationally accredited associate's degree or diploma 
nursing program are awarded following successful completion of designated courses in the RN 
curriculum. After a transcript evaluation has been completed, the RN student completes the 
necessary individually determined core and cognate credits along with 19 credits of course 
work in the professional nursing major. This course work includes one clinical practice course 
in community health, which uses a flexible adult learning model for scheduling. As adult 
learners, RN students also have the opportunity to earn credit by CLEP subject exams and 
Prior Learning Assessment. Under ordinary circumstances, graduates of associate degree 
programs are not required to complete more than 66 total credits in core, cognate, and major 
requirements at Misericordia University. RN students who hold a bachelor's degree in another 
field are exempt from core requirements. 

In addition to meeting the admission requirements for RN students, articulation status and the 
awarding of advanced placement credits is determined by the following: 

a. Graduates from NLN accredited associate's degree or diploma nursing programs 
within three years of the application date are eligible for direct articulation and will 
be awarded 32 advanced-placement credits for their prior nursing course work. 

b. Graduates from NLN accredited associate's degree or diploma nursing programs 
within four to ten years of the application date must provide official written 
documentation of completion of a minimum of 1 ,000 hours or more clinical practice 
during the three years prior to the application date to be eligible for direct 
articulation and the awarding of 32 advanced-placement credits for their prior 
nursing course work. 

c. Applicants who have graduated more than ten years prior to the application date 
must provide a resume detailing clinical experience, along with official written 
documentation of completion of a minimum of 1 ,000 hours or more clinical practice 
during the three years prior to the application date. These candidates may be 
required to complete a full portfolio or validation testing prior to being eligible for 
articulation and the awarding of 32 advanced-placement credits prior to nursing 
course work. 

d. Applicants who have not graduated from an NLN accredited nursing program must 
successfully complete validation testing before prior learning credits are awarded. 

For more information, prospective students should contact the Expressway Office at (570) 
674-3022. 

§ An RN-MSN option is available for those registered nurses who do not hold a BSN degree 
and who wish to pursue graduate education (see Graduate Nursing Programs). 



1 64 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Core Requirements (number of credits vary; see core curriculum requirements) 

Required Cognates Courses 6 credits 

HP 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

MTH115 Basic Statistics 3 

Required Professional Nursing Courses 19 credits 

NSG 397 Professional Nursing Concepts I 2 

NSG 398 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan 3 

NSG 410 Introduction to Nursing Research 3 

NSG 460 Professional Nursing Concepts II 4 

NSG 465 Application of Professional Nursing Concepts 4 

NSG 555 Legal, Ethical, and Public Policy Issues in Health Care 3 
Elective Credits (number of credits vary) 

Second Degree and Adult Learner Option 

The second degree option is designed for individuals who have completed a non-nursing 
bachelor's degree. The adult learner option is designed for those individuals who have 
completed extensive college-level coursework and/or a non-nursing associate's degree. 

Second Degree Day Options 

Individuals entering the second degree option do not need to meet the core curriculum 
requirements of the university. The total number of credits required for graduation (126 credits) 
includes transferred core, nursing prerequisite courses (21 credits) and credits required in the 
nursing major (51 credits). In addition, 6 graduate credits can be earned while completing the 
BSN degree. The majority of the prerequisite courses must be completed prior to starting the 
nursing courses in the full-time program and all the prerequisites must be completed prior to 
starting the part-time evening option. 

Adult Learner Option - PTAEP 

Those completing the adult learner option may have to complete all university core courses. 
The total number of credits required for graduation (126 credits) includes core, prerequisites 
(21 credits) and credits required in the nursing major (51 credits). The majority of the 
prerequisite courses must be completed prior to starting the nursing courses in the full-time 
program and all the prerequisites must be completed prior to starting the part-time evening 
option. Students with a related field associate degree will be required to complete, either by 
direct transfer and/or completion of coursework at Misericordia University, at least one course 
in all core curriculum areas prior to graduation. 

Both the second degree and the adult learner options are available in the full-time day and the 
part-time accelerated evening (PTAENP) formats. 

Prerequisite Courses (21 -24 credits) - Second degree and adult learner students take the 
following prior to starting The nursing courses: 

BIO 227 Bacteriology 4 

BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology 4 

BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology 4 

HP 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 3 

PSY 275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 

NSG 201* Foundations Essential to Professional Nursing Practice 3 

MTH115| Basic Statistics 3 

* NSG 201 coreq in second degree program with permission of chair 
f MTH 115 may be taken as a co-requisite in the full-time option only. 

* May be taken either fall or spring. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 65 



Nursing, Full-time Day Option 

Sequence of Required Courses 

Pre requisites: A&P I & II, Bacteriology, Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, NSG 201 

Statistics 



Sophomore Year 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

NSG 201 Foundations Essential 3 

to Professional Nursing 
Practice 



Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 12-15 


Second Semester Total Credits 13 


NSG 300 


Conceptual Basis of 


2 


NSG 303 


FHP Adult 11 6 




Professional Nursing 




NSG 304 


FHP Pediatric Nursing 4 


NSG 301 


FHP Adult 1 


6 


NSG 305 


Physical Assessment 3 


NSG 302 


FH P. Psych-mental 
Health 


4 




across the Lifespan 


NSG 201 


Foundations Essential to 
Professional Nursing 
Practice (May be taken 
concurrently with 
chairperson permission) 


3 






Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 12-15 


Second Semester Total Credits 11-14 


NSG 410 


Introduction to Nursing 


3 


NSG 403 


FHP Aggregates and 4 


/HP 410 


Research 






Populations 


NSG 401 


FHP Adult 111 


5 


NSG 404 


FHP Adult IV 4 


NSG 402 


FHP Child bearing and 


4 


NSG 405 


Baccalaureate Capstone 3 




Family 




GRAD 


Elective 3 


GRAD 


Elective 


3 







Part-time Accelerated Evening Nursing Program (PTAENP) 

All classes are held on Monday and Thursday evenings. Classes start at 5 p.m. Other days 
may need to be scheduled depending on clinical availability. All students are admitted into a 
cohort which commences study in May of each year. Pre requisites: A&P I & II, Bacteriology, 
Developmental Psychology, Nutrition, Statistics 



766 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Yearl 

Sequence of Required Courses 
Summer 



Year 3 



Monday Class - Thursday Clinical 

NSG 201 Foundations Essential to 

Professional Nursing Practice 





NSG 302 


FHP Psych Mental Health 


4 




Fall 1 
NSG 300 

NSG 301 


Conceptual Basis of 
Professional Nursing 
Practice 
FHP Adult 1 


Spring 1 

2 NSG 303 

NSG 305 

6 


FHP Adult 11 
Physical Assessment 
across the Lifespan 


6 
3 


Year 2 


Summer 2 
Session 1 










NSG 304 


FHP Pediatric Nursing 


4 






NSG 402 


FHP - Child Bearing and Family 4 
(12 hour clinical/week) 




Fall 2 

NSG 403 


FHP Aggregates and 


Spring 2 
4 NSG 401 


FHP Adult 111 


5 




Populations 


NSG 410 


Introduction to Nursing 
Research 


3 



HP 320 Principles of Pharmacology 3 



Summer 3 
NSG 404 
NSG 405 



FHP Adult IV 
Baccalaureate Capstone 



Second Degree Students 

Second degree students in good standing may earn graduate credits while completing the 
undergraduate program with permission of their advisor. Students may register to take any two 
of the following graduate courses after successful completion of the indicated prerequisite 
course work: 

a. NSG 512 Concepts and Theories in Nursing 

b. NSG 555 Legal, Ethical, and Public Policies in Health Care 

Note: Taking graduate coursework may require students to attend classes at times other than 
proposed in the part-time schedule. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 67 



Nursing Course Descriptions (NSG) 

201 Foundations of Nursing 3 credits 

This course emphasizes basic nursing concepts and the recognition of select functional 
health patterns such as activity-exercise, nutritional-metabolic, elimination, and sleep- 
rest functional health patterns, Basic theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are 
taught and implemented within a nursing practice framework. Competencies in 
cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills are developed and refined in clinical practice 
settings and/or simulated clinical situations. 
(2 credits lecture and 1 credit clinical/laboratory) 

Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 227, PSY 275, HP 241; Co-requisite: BIO 212 

210 Conceptual Base of Nursing Practice 2 credits 

The emphasis in this course is on assisting the student to develop a theoretical base for 
nursing practice. Students are introduced to nursing process and the metaparadigm. An 
overview of selected models/theories will be presented as a way to view nursing 
practice. 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all nursing prerequisites 

300 Concepts of Nursing 2 credits 
This course presents an overview of major health professions, with a focus on the 
profession of nursing. The emphasis in this course is on assisting the student to develop 
a theoretical base for professional nursing practice based on Gordon's functional health 
patterns. Students are introduced to the nursing metaparadigm, nursing theorists, and 
the nursing process as a foundation for baccalaureate nursing practice. 

Prerequisites: NSG 201, BIO 212 

301 Functional Health Patterns Adults I 6 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including 
coping and stress tolerance; cognitive-perceptual; nutritional/metabolic; activity and 
exercise; and elimination. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to 
achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in 
medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the autonomic nervous, integumentary, 
musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal systems, in addition to pain and infectious disease 
as health problems of adults. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical 
thinking skills to examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that 
influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits 
lecture and 3 credits clinical/laboratory) 

Prerequisites: NSG 201; Co-requisite NSG 300 

302 Functional Health Patterns Psychiatric Nursing 4 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns of clients 
with psychiatric-mental health problems, including health perception/health 
management; cognitive-perceptual; sleep-rest; self perception/self concept; role- 
relationship; sexuality-reproductive; value-belief; and coping/stress tolerance. 
Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health 
outcomes for clients with acute and chronic mental health disorders. Emphasis is placed 



1 68 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



on psychobiology, psychiatric genetics, and psychosocial therapeutic modalities used in 
the nursing care of adults and children with psychiatric disorders. Students apply 
principles of psychopharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current 
research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of 
nursing care to clients in the psychiatric setting. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical) 

Prerequisites: NSG 201; Co-requisite NSG 301 

303 Functional Health Patterns Adults II 6 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including 
cognitive-perceptual; nutritional/metabolic; activity and exercise. Theoretical, scientific, 
and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for adult clients 
with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the 
metabolic, cardiovascular, sensory, autoimmune, and respiratory problems of adults. 
Students will work in a variety of settings including caring for patients in the perioperative 
period. Students apply principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to 
examine current research evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning 
and delivery of nursing care to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 3 credits 
clinical/laboratory) 

Prerequisites: NSG 201; Co-requisite NSG 301 

304 Functional Health Patterns Pediatrics 4 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns in children 
from infancy through young adulthood. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles 
are used to achieve positive health outcomes for pediatric clients and their families with 
acute and chronic illness in a variety of pediatric settings. Emphasis is placed on normal 
growth and development. Students examine the applications of current research 
evidence, principles of pharmacology, as well as legal and ethical issues influencing the 
planning and delivery of nursing care to pediatric clients and their families. (2 credits 
lecture and 2 credits clinical/laboratory) 

Prerequisites: NSG 300, NSG 301, NSG 302; Co-requisite NSG 303 

305 Physical Assessment 3 credits 
This course examines techniques used by nurses in the ongoing assessment of the 
health status of patients. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, obtaining health 
histories, and physical assessment techniques used across the lifespan. (2 credits 
lecture and 1 credit laboratory) 

320 (HP) Pharmacology 3 credits 

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge and 
understanding of essential principles of pharmacology. The course will focus on 
therapeutic classifications; characteristic drug groups; physiologic influences on drug 
effects; principles of therapy; drug interactions; and legal, ethical, and economic issues 
of drug therapy. 

350 Intermediate Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan I 3 credits 

This course introduces concepts that establish a framework for wellness promotion 
within microsystems (individuals and families) across the lifespan. Research relevant to 
health promotion will be introduced. 

Prerequisites: BIO 211, BIO 212, BIO 227, PSY 275, HP 100, HP 241, NSG 210. All 
coursework required through first year and sophomore year. Corequisites: NSG 355 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 69 



351 Intermediate Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan II 3 credits 

The concept of wellness is explored as it relates to individuals and families. Stress is 
examined as it impacts on the wellness of persons experiencing alterations in comfort, 
mobility, acid-base, fluid & electrolyte, gas exchange and transport. Personal, theoretical 
and empirical knowledge from the sciences, humanities and nursing are utilized as a 
frame of reference for understanding the maintenance of wellness. 

Prerequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355, NSG 365, NSG 361. Corequisite: NSG 356. 

355 Application of Intermediate Concepts Across the Lifespan I 3 credits 
This course will apply the nursing process and selected nursing theorists to wellness 
concepts of microsystems (individuals and families) throughout the lifespan. 

Corequisite: NSG 350 

356 Application of Intermediate Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan II 3 credits 
Selected nursing theorists are utilized to develop a framework of nursing care for clients 
and families experiencing a temporary loss in their level of wellness due to an alteration 
in comfort, stress, mobility, fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, transport 
and gas exchange. Health teaching, legal-ethical issues and research are discussed as 
they impact on individual/family wellness throughout the lifespan. 

Corequisite: NSG 351 

361 Clinical Application of Intermediate Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan I 3 
credits 

The focus of nursing care is explored through clinical application of nursing process and 
nursing theories to clinical situations within microsystems (individual and families) across 
the lifespan. The student will focus on promotion of wellness. 

Corequisites or prerequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355, NSG 365 

362 Clinical Application of Intermediate Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan II 4 
credits 

The focus of nursing care is explored through clinical application of nursing process and 
nursing theories to clinical situations with clients/families experiencing a temporary loss 
of wellness. The student is exposed to clinical situations of acute care and community 
health with clients across the lifespan. Semester junior year. 

Corequisites or prerequisites: NSG 351, NSG 356, NSG 366 

365 Intermediate Clinical Nursing Concepts, Strategies and Skills I 1 credit 
This course develops and refines competencies in cognitive, affective, and psychomotor 
skills for application in clinical settings across the lifespan. Scientific and humanistic 
concepts are integrated with simulation of clinical skills. 

Corequisites or prerequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355 

366 Intermediate Clinical Nursing Concepts, Strategies and Skills II 1 credit 
Develops intermediate competencies in cognitive, affective, and therapeutic 
communication skills for application in a clinical setting. Scientific and humanistic 
concepts are integrated with simulation of clinical skills for microsystems (individuals and 
families) experiencing a temporary loss of wellness across the lifespan. 

Corequisites or prerequisites: NSG 350, NSG 355 



1 70 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



397 Professional Nursing Concepts I 2 credits 
This course focuses on concepts basic to the development of professional practitioners. 
Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, nursing theories, and the re-socialization of the 
professional nursing role. Knowledge bases for professional practice, the changing 
health care system, information technology, and practice strategies, including wellness 
and health promotion across the lifespan are explored. 

Prerequisite: RN status 

398 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan 3 credits 
This course examines techniques used by registered nurses in the ongoing assessment 
of the health status of clients. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, obtaining health 
histories, and physical assessment techniques used across the lifespan. 

Prerequisites: Junior nursing, senior nursing or RN status 

401 Functional Health Patterns Adults III 5 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns, including 
coping and stress tolerance; cognitive-perceptual; health perception-health 
management, nutritional/metabolic; activity and exercise; and elimination. Theoretical, 
scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health outcomes for 
adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical settings. Emphasis is 
placed on altered cellular proliferation, and alterations in endocrine, neurologic, 
oncology, renal and hepatic function as health problems of adults. Students apply 
principles of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research 
evidence and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care 
to adults and their families. (3 credits lecture and 3 credits clinical) 

Prerequisites: NSG 303, NSG 304, NSG 305; Co-requisite NSG 402 

402 Functional Health Patterns Childbearing 4 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing, basic and 
psychosocial sciences and focuses on sexuality and reproductive functional health 
patterns of women and their families to achieve a positive pregnancy outcome and safe 
fetal environment. Emphasis is placed on normal, as well as, abnormal processes of 
childbirth to provide students with the knowledge and basic obstetrical skills to care for 
women, newborns, and families experiencing a normal obstetrical course and those 
experiencing complications. Students examine human genetics, the application of 
current research evidence, principles of pharmacology, and legal/ethical issues 
influencing the planning and delivery of nursing care to pregnant women, newborns, and 
families. In the clinical component of the course, emphasis is placed on the role of the 
professional nurse working in the obstetrical specialty, the application of the nursing 
process in providing nursing care to pregnant women, newborns, and families and the 
enhancement of critical thinking skills, therapeutic nursing interventions, select 
pharmacotherapies, effective communication and interpersonal skills. (2 credits lecture 
and 2 credits clinical) 

Prerequisites: NSG 303, NSG 304, and NSG 305; Co-requisite NSG 401 

403 Functional Health Patterns in Populations 4 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores alterations in functional health patterns, including self- 
perception, self-concept; sexuality-reproductive; coping-stress tolerance; health 
perception-health management, value-belief; cognitive-perceptual, and role relationship. 
Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive health 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 171 



outcomes for individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations. Emphasis 
is placed on population-centered health care in the community. The values of public 
health nursing concepts are embedded within the implementation of community-oriented 
nursing practice. In the clinical component of the course, nursing practice takes place in 
a variety of public settings. Perspectives in global health care are considered in relation 
to a population-based approach and its major health problems and burdens of disease. 
Students examine the application of current research evidence, principles of 
pharmacology, as well as legal and ethical issues influencing the planning and delivery 
of health care to individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and populations. The 
role of the nurse as community leader is emphasized. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits 
clinical) 

Prerequisites: NSG 401, NSG 402; Co-requisite NSG 404 

404 Functional Health Patterns Adults IV 4 credits 
This course builds upon previous knowledge and skills from nursing and the basic and 
social sciences and explores selected alterations in functional health patterns including, 
nutritional/metabolic; activity-exercise, elimination, cognitive-perceptual, health 
perception-health management pattern, coping and stress tolerance, and value-belief 
pattern.. Theoretical, scientific, and humanistic principles are used to achieve positive 
health outcomes for adult clients with acute and chronic illness in medical surgical 
settings. Emphasis is placed on the normal aging process and pathophysiologic 
changes of adults with complex health problems and critical alterations in cardiovascular, 
integumentary, hematological, and multi-system dysfunction. Students apply principles 
of pharmacology and use critical thinking skills to examine current research evidence 
and legal-ethical issues that influence the planning and delivery of nursing care to adults 
and their families. (2 credits lecture and 2 credits clinical) 

Prerequisites: NSG 401, NSG 402; Co-requisite NSG 403 

405 Baccalaureate Capstone 3 credits 
This capstone course is focused on facilitating the transition from the role of student to 
the role of the professional nurse in the contemporary health care environment. 
Strategies for success on the national licensing examination are designed and 
implemented. Students are introduced to leadership and management concepts as they 
apply to professional practice and the health care milieu. Critical analysis of legal, 
ethical, and diversity issues in health care is emphasized. 

Prerequisites: NSG 401, NSG 402, ; Co-requisite NSG 403, NSG 404 

410 Introduction to Nursing Research 3 credits 

This introductory course is designed to prepare students to become consumers of 
research who critically evaluate and base care on evidence. Emphasis is placed on the 
components of the quantitative and qualitative research processes, the concepts and 
terms associated with these processes, and the competencies necessary to read, 
evaluate, and interpret research findings for practice. Building on critical thinking skills, 
this course will expand students' knowledge by assisting them to develop and use 
principles of evidence based healthcare to address problems in professional practice. 

Prerequisite: MTH 115; Cross reference HP 410 

* Students who have completed a three-credit research course may not be required 
to complete HP (NSG) 410. 



1 72 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



450 Advanced Nursing Concepts across the Lifespan I 3 credits 
The focus of this course is on concepts relating to the group aspect of macro-systems. 
Restoration of wellness across the lifespan is addressed with emphasis on cell 
proliferation, neurological/neurobiological and endocrine deviations and behavioral 
adjustment. Group leadership and evaluation of selected research is emphasized. 

Prerequisites: NSG 351, NSG 356, NSG 362, NSG 366. Corequisite: NSG 455 

451 Advanced Nursing Concepts Across the Lifespan II 3 credits 
The focus of this course is on concepts relating to macrosystems (groups and 
communities). Synthesis of wellness, multisystem problems and health care across the 
lifespan will be addressed, as well as application of research and 
leadership/management. 

Prerequisites: NSG 450, NSG 455, NSG 461. Corequisite: NSG 456 

455 Advanced Nursing Application Across the Lifespan I 3 credits 
The nursing care of macrosystems (groups) in need of restoration of wellness across the 
lifespan will be addressed. Selected nursing theories will be used. Health teaching, 
legal/ethical issues and evaluation of research findings will be emphasized within the 
framework of the nursing process. 

Corequisite: NSG 450 

456 Advanced Nursing Application Across the Lifespan II 3 credits 
The focus of this course is the application and synthesis of nursing in the community and 
in intense crises areas using selected nursing theorists. Health teaching, legal/ethical 
issues, leadership/management and the application of research will be emphasized 
within the framework of the nursing process. 

Prerequisites: All courses through first semester senior year; corequisite: NSG 451 

460 Professional Nursing Concepts II 4 credits 
This course focuses on the concept of aggregates at-risk, including families and 
communities. Family and community assessment is emphasized. Nursing theory, 
nursing process, and principles of leadership and management are applied to models for 
health planning and population focused practice. Basic concepts of epidemiology are 
presented and applied to national health initiatives. 

Prerequisite: NSG 397 (RN's only) 

461 Clinical Application of Advanced Nsg Concepts Across the Lifespan I 4 credits 
Clinical application of the concepts of selected nursing theorists are emphasized within 
the context of the nursing process. Nursing care is provided to groups in need of 
restoration of wellness in such settings as chronic and long-term care. Therapeutic 
communication skills, teaching/learning, legal/ethical issues and group processes will be 
emphasized. 

Corequisite or prerequisites: NSG 450, NSG 455 

462 Clinical Application of Advanced Nsg Concepts Across the Lifespan II 4 credits 
Clinical application of concepts of selected nursing theorists will be addressed. Nursing 
care experience is provided within the framework of the nursing process to 
individuals/families and groups in the community to enable synthesis of previous learning 
experiences. 

Corequisite or prerequisites: NSG 451, NSG 456 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 73 



465 Clinical Application of Professional Nursing Concepts 4 credits 
Clinical application of baccalaureate nursing concepts will be emphasized. Students will 
work with aggregates in the community to implement interventions to promote health. 
Nursing care delivery systems in the community will be explored. Application of case 
management principles and strategies for individuals and/or groups in the community will 
be examined. 

Prerequisite: NSG 460 (RN's only) 

466 Advanced Clinical Nursing Concepts, Strategies, and Skills 1 credit 
This course further develops and refines advanced competencies in cognitive, affective 
and psychomotor skills for application in a clinical setting. Scientific and humanistic 
concepts are integrated with simulation of clinical skills. 

Prerequisite: NSG 362 

475 Issues in Nursing 2 credits 

The focus of this course is to facilitate the student into the professional nursing role. The 
historical, current and futuristic aspects of nursing will be examined along with 
behavioral, socioeconomic, environmental, legal, ethical and political issues. Emphasis 
is placed on debate in order to promote active discourse and critical thinking. 

Prerequisite: Completion of all 300 level nursing courses 

480 Special Topics in Nursing 1-3 credits 

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue the investigation of selected 
topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with 
preregistration information. 



Occupational Therapy Major 

College of Health Sciences 
Degree MS, Occupational Therapy 

Department Chair Grace Fisher, EdD, OTR/L 

Coordinator, Doctoral Program Ellen McLaughlin, EdD, OTR/L 

Coordinator, Weekend Program Gwen Bartolacci, OTD, OTR/L 

Faculty and Staff 

Gwen Bartolacci, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, AS Mount Aloysious College; BS 
University of North Dakota; MS The Pennsylvania State University; OTD Nova Southeastern 
University 

Joseph A. Cipriani, Professor of Occupational Therapy, BA Wilkes College; BS College 
Misericordia; MA Wichita State University; EdD Nova Southeastern University 

Verna G. Eschenfelder, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, BS University of Texas 
Medical Branch, MS, PhD Texas Woman'sUniversity 

Grace S. Fisher, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy; BA Wilkes University, Post- 
Baccalaureate Certificate University of Pennsylvania; MS College Misericordia; EdD Temple 
University 



1 74 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Amy Lynch, Coordinator of Post Professional Pediatric Certificate, BS Gettysburg College; MS 
Tuft's University 

Ellen McLaughlin, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, BS and MS College Misericordia; 
EdD Rutger's University 

Lalit J. Shah, Professor of Occupational Therapy, BS University of Bombay; MS College 
Misericordia; EdD Nova Southeastern University 

Dawn Evans, Academic Coordinator of Fieldwork Education, BS and MS College Misericordia 

Since 1985, the occupational therapy department has been preparing occupational therapy 
practitioners to utilize theory-based, occupation-focused assessment and intervention 
strategies to assist the individual in improving functional performance. Recently, the curriculum 
has been updated to reflect the three themes of occupation, evidence based-practice and 
community based practice. Successful completion of the program results in a professional 
master of science degree in occupational therapy. Graduates of the program can expect to 
practice successfully in a variety of traditional and non-traditional health care delivery models 
with clients across the lifespan. 

Two entry options are available. The weekday program is five years in length and is 
traditionally selected by recent high school graduates. The weekend program utilizes a three- 
year model, with classes meeting on alternating weekends year round. This program is 
specifically designed for COTAs and those individuals already possessing a baccalaureate 
degree in another discipline. 

The five-year weekday program combines the foundation of a liberal arts education with 
professional occupational therapy coursework to produce a holistic practitioner who has a 
strong background in the use of occupation and critical inquiry skills to advance the 
profession. Students achieve a bachelor's degree in health science along with the master of 
science in occupational therapy degree. Opportunities exist to complete a bachelor of science 
degree in psychology, as well as a minor or certificate in several other areas of study, 
including a pediatric specialization.. This provides additional flexibility to the student who 
chooses to gain expertise to enhance the educational preparation within occupational therapy. 

The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, 
4720 Montgomery Avenue, PO Box 31220, Bethesda, MD, 20814-3425, (301) 652-2682. 
Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the occupational therapy examination given by 
the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. Successful candidates are able 
to apply for occupational therapy licensure in the state chosen for employment. 

Mission 

The mission of the Occupational Therapy Department at Misericordia University is to provide 
an environment that reflects the values and attitudes of justice, mercy, service, and hospitality. 
The Trinity of Learning is exemplified by experiences in core courses in the liberal arts, the 
occupational therapy curriculum, and a variety of service-related experiences. We strive to 
provide quality education through high academic standards, an emphasis on understanding 
human occupation, and an emphasis on evidence-based practice; aim to offer outstanding 
professional preparation through specialty tracks and choices of undergraduate majors and 
minors directly related to the profession of occupational therapy; and work to serve others 
through an emphasis on volunteering and service learning experiences. We strive to provide 
educational opportunities in formats that are accessible to both entry level and post- 
professional students through our weekday, weekend, and post-professional programs. Our 
ultimate mission is to help students become competent, responsible and involved 
professionals within their communities. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 75 



Philosophy 

The individual is a holistic, dynamic system that consists of biological, psychological, 
sociocultural and spiritual dimensions in interaction with the environment. Occupations are the 
primary means for individuals to interact with their environment. Occupations are the 
organizing elements that influence our perceptions and actions in an individualistic and 
emergent fashion. 

The individual possesses an innate drive to explore and accommodate to their environment 
that is essential to human existence, not only as a means of survival, but also as enabling the 
process of self actualization (AOTA, 2003). The drive toward action when channeled into 
occupation is fundamental to development, health, adaptation and satisfaction. 

Occupational performance reflects the individual's dynamic experience of engaging in daily 
occupations within the environment (Law & Baum, 1994). It includes the ability to adapt, cope 
with the challenges of daily living, and fulfill age specific life roles through goal directed 
meaningful occupations. The interpersonal relationships within an occupational context also 
influence performance. Dysfunction in occupational performance is an individually determined 
state of being defined at any one time by personal, social, and cultural variables (Fidler, 1996). 
Occupational therapy is the use and application of occupation and interventions to create a 
balanced lifestyle of occupational performance from the consumers' perspective. These 
interventions are based on a critical analysis of clinically relevant evidence and research 
literature. Occupational therapy prevents occupational dysfunction, and maintains, promotes 
and restores health and occupational performance through engagement in occupation and the 
use of compensatory, technological and environmental adaptation and modification (Practice 
Framework, 2002). The therapeutic relationship between consumer and therapist enhances 
occupational performance. 

The education of the occupational therapy student is guided by several beliefs. We believe 
that individuals construct knowledge based on their unique interpretation of meaningful 
experiences. Education is not a product to be delivered, but rather is a process to be 
facilitated with each student. Faculty can encourage the construction of knowledge by setting 
the stage for meaningful interactions, reflections, and experiences (Howard, et al, 2000), 
however students are the architects of their own learning. The role of the student is to actively 
engage in occupations during the learning process, engage in self assessment and collaborate 
with other students in an increasingly self-directed manner. Involvement of the student in 
community based initiatives that reflect the values of mercy and service lead to the 
development of role emergent and creative professionals who are capable of taking the 
initiative to respond to the needs of their clients and communities. Engaging students in 
contribution's that add to the profession's body of knowledge provide a means for them to be 
developers of knowledge rather than merely recipients of information. Through this guided 
process, the student develops the ability to critically think, develop professional behaviors and 
integrate the skills necessary to become a life long learner. 

Curriculum Design 

A liberal arts education provides the essential academic foundation for occupational therapy 
education at Misericordia University. Within the occupational therapy curriculum, our students 
learn to analyze situations critically, think logically, employ scientific methodology 
appropriately, express themselves clearly and persuasively in both oral and written media, 
consider the numerous dimensions of the person during intervention including the physical, 
psychological, social, cultural, historical, and spiritual components; appreciate the arts and use 
them in their work; and follow a standard of ethical conduct in their personal and professional 
lives. These abilities are critical for laying the foundation for the student for transition to an 
entry level OT practitioner. As students progress through the five-year educational process, 



1 76 Bachelor's Degree Programs 






they are also socialized into the profession. This involves actively participating in professional 
organizations, becoming advocates for consumers, and developing a commitment to lifelong 
learning. 

The manner in which the occupational therapy curriculum is delivered is complex. The 
curriculum design reflects both the mission and philosophy of the occupational therapy 
department and university as well as the philosophy of the profession. 

This curriculum is designed on beliefs the occupational therapy faculty holds in regard to 
professional education. We hold that these beliefs are in accordance with our philosophy and 
reflect the program mission and are well incorporated into learning modules and program 
objectives. These include the following concepts: 

A solid foundation in the liberal arts and in normal growth and development allows for a 
thorough understanding of the dimensions of human performance. 

The development of knowledge occurs in a sequential process beginning with basic 
concepts and techniques and progressing to increasingly more complex constructs and 
application of these concepts and constructs in practice. 

Individuals construct knowledge based on their unique interpretation of meaningful 
experiences. Faculty can encourage the construction of knowledge by setting the stage 
for meaningful interactions, reflections, and experiences (Howard, et al, 2000), however 
students are the architects of their own learning. 

Skills of inquiry, critical reasoning and problem solving are essential professional 
behaviors for practicing occupational therapists. 

Continuous examination and definition of one's own values and attitudes are critical 
steps in the growth and development of professional behaviors and ethical practice. 

Development of interpersonal skills and an appreciation of the value of collaboration 
must be integral to all learning experiences. 

The occupational therapy curriculum is designed in such a way as to reflect the values and 
intent of the profession. Students enter the program at two levels, each based on whether the 
student applies to the weekday five-year program or the three and a half year weekend college 
(WEC) program. Upon entry to the professional sequence of coursework, students follow a 
structured, integrated sequence of learning experiences that will prepare them to become 
entry-level occupational therapists. Based upon the profession's philosophy, the university and 
program mission, the educational outcome goals of the curriculum, which includes both 
didactic and fieldwork components (Level I and Level II), provide a learning experience such 
that: Graduates of the Misericordia University Occupational Therapy Program, will meet the 
following: 

Occupational Therapy Program Curricular Goals: 

1. Demonstrate skills necessary to participate in designing and implementing a 
beginning-level research project. 

2. Describe the process an occupational therapist would use to engage in evidence 
based practice (EBP). 

3. Demonstrate the usage of evidence based practice. 

4. Recognize and respect the significance that incorporating EBP has for individual OT 
practitioners when interacting with their clients. 

5. Demonstrate and analyze the role and importance of participation in occupation 
throughout the life span. 

6. Assess client needs via an occupational profile and an occupational performance 
analysis. 

7. Identify, analyze and apply major tenets from the discipline of occupational science. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 177 



8. Plan and implement occupation-based occupational therapy intervention programs 
that are culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice and 
supported with appropriate theoretical perspectives. 

9. Design and critique programs that promote access to occupational therapy and 
provide services for individuals, groups and populations, especially the underserved. 

10. Demonstrate management and leadership skills that are applicable to a variety of 
practice settings. 

1 1 . Design creative and entrepreneurial ideas for occupational therapy services. 

12. Demonstrate skilled collaboration and consultation when dealing with others in the 
community. 

13. Evaluate the process for securing potential funding for pilot, start-up and on-going 
programs for occupational therapy. 

14. Discuss and evaluate ongoing professional development to ensure a level of 
practice consistent with current and accepted standards. 

15. Discuss major historical events and their influence on occupational therapy theory, 
models and practice. 

Curriculum Themes 

Three themes provide the overarching structure to the curriculum design. These themes were 
developed by the faculty following a full curricular review considering years of student 
feedback, program outcomes and consideration of the new standards and centennial vision. 
These themes are: 

Occupation Focused Practice 

Features of occupation focused practice include the ability to collaboratively determine the 
meaning and purpose of an individual's occupational profile, identify needs and priorities, and 
construct a plan of motivating therapeutic activities. This process, infused with occupations, 
reflects best practice and results in a more meaningful lifestyle. 

Our curriculum is developed to foster an understanding and appreciation of: 

the role of occupation throughout the life span 

how occupation is used as a means and an end in occupational therapy practice 

the value of occupation based assessment and intervention 

how the focus on occupational performance improves therapeutic outcomes therapeutic 
outcomes 

Evidence Based Practice 

Evidence based practice is a collaborative process between therapist and client in which the 
best available research evidence, in combination with the therapist's clinical experience, is 
reviewed to determine the most appropriate therapeutic options that support the client's 
occupational goals. Essential to this is the therapist's ability to recognize and respect the 
significance that EBP will have for the profession, as well as for the client. 

Community Initiative 

Community initiatives help to increase access to occupational therapy services for all 
individuals, groups and populations, especially those underserved. We prepare students to 
work in emerging practice areas and community settings as well as traditional settings. We 
desire to instill in out students leadership characteristics for service to the community, 
including an entrepreneurial spirit, skilled interdisciplinary collaboration and the ability to 
identify funding resources. 



1 78 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Course Sequences 

In order to meet our curricular goals, the sequence of coursework is delivered using a 
progressive approach. This sequence covers five areas: Liberal Arts & Foundational 
Knowledge, Individual Development and Occupation, Professional & Community Initiatives, 
Clinical Performance, Reasoning & Application, and Research & EBP: Strengthening our 
Knowledge Base. The five interwoven sequences of education are described in more detail 
below. 

Sequence I Liberal Arts and Foundational Knowledge (Core, Cognate, OT 312, OT 313) 

Students establish the foundation of knowledge through the completion of all liberal arts core 
courses, BIO 211 and 212:Anatomy and Physiology, OT 312 Functional Anatomy and OT 313 
Applied Neuroscience. The science foundation provides a basis for clinical expertise regarding 
knowledge of body structures and functions. The liberal arts provide a broad foundation upon 
which to build the student's professional education. Required courses in psychology and 
psychopathology provide a further basis from which the student can begin to understand the 
interaction between the individual, their environment and 

Sequence II Individual Development , Environment and Occupation (OT 205, 220, 221, 

275, 320, 330, 335) 

Students are introduced to the concepts of human growth and development through the two- 
course sequence exploring the Human Development (OT 220 and OT 221). and concurrently 
explore the theories and analysis of occupations from the perspective of self and other (OT 
205, 275). OT 335 provides a thorough investigation of the influences that the environment 
may have on occupational performance, and OT 330 introduces the students to the many 
models and frames of reference that may be used to guide the development of a 
comprehensive and holistic approach to the client. OT 320 promotes students understanding 
of impairments and disabilities and their potential influences on occupational performance. 

Sequence III Professional and Community Initiatives (OT 103, OT 410, 411, 412 570, 630) 

Students learn the importance of developing professional behaviors and the application of 
these behaviors to develop individual therapeutic relationships and leadership skills in the 
community. Professional behaviors are introduced in OT 103, where broad issues about the 
profession, such as its' standards, ethics and vision for the future are discussed. The 
Community Based Practice Series (OT 410,411,412) provide less structured opportunities for 
students to create occupational opportunities in non-traditional settings, and to take an active 
role in the development of their learning. OT 570 assists the student in acquiring the traditional 
management and supervisory skills necessary in may of today's practice environments, as well 
as the leadership capacities for entrepreneurial work. OT 630, as a culminating course, 
requires the student to investigate the professional issues and trends in the profession that will 
challenge and motivate them as they enter into practice as entry level therapists. 

Sequence IV Clinical Performance, Reasoning and Application (OT 405, 407, 510, 511 

512, 601, 602) 

The development of clinical skills begins in OT 405 and OT 407 where students acquire 
general competencies in conducting an occupation centered evaluation and assessment 
process and attaint he entry-level clinical skills that are required to progress through the 
intervention series in upcoming semesters. The Intervention Series, OT 510, 511 and 512, 
provide the students with opportunities to integrate prior levels of learning to construct 
intervention for a variety of clients with an occupation and evidence based approach derived 
from on theoretical principles. The final application of this sequence occurs during the 
student's Level II FW experiences (OT 601 and 602). 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 79 



Sequence V Research and EBP - Strengthening our Knowledge Base (OT 520, 433, 633) 

While basic bibliographic, search and information literacy are introduced early throughout the 
curriculum, the essence of the research series begins in OT 520 where students learn about 
qualitative and quantitative research designs, grants, and the research process. OT 690 and 
OT 695 require them to take a research proposal from start to finish, designing a study, 
collecting data, and analyzing and presenting results. OT 433 begins the evidence based 
practice components, where students complete and individual EBP review throughout the 
semester. These skills are later applied at the graduate level, in OT 633, where students work 
individually, but collaborate online to share resources while they are on Level II fieldwork. This 
final EBP course results in a project to be shared with the fieldwork site. 

Admissions 

Students with a diverse background of extracurricular activity, leadership positions, an 
appreciation for the relevance that occupation plays in their individual lives, and who meet the 
following criteria will be considered for the occupational therapy program: 

Weekday five year professional entry-level master's degree: 

High school science background required in biology and mathematics; physics 
recommended 

Minimum of 2.5 cumulative high school GPA 

1 ,000 SAT score and/or top 20th percentile in class ranking 

Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly 
recommended) 

A full day (6-8 hours) of documented service in a health care setting with an 

occupational 

therapist by the beginning of studies. 

Submission of a 500-word, typed statement of personal and professional goals 

On a space-available basis, students who do not meet the minimum criteria for SAT or class 
rank will have their applications competitively reviewed. Individuals selected then need to be 
successfully interviewed by an occupational therapy faculty member. 

COTAs must submit evidence of current NBCOT certification 

If a COTA, one year of full-time employment as a COTA is recommended. 

Transfer into the weekday five-year professional entry-level master's degree 

Misericordia University accepts a limited number of transfer students into the weekday five 
year entry-level master's degree program. Transfer students are typically admitted at the first 
year or sophomore level of this program. Transfer admission into the sophomore level occurs 
only when space is available. Transfer credits are evaluated on an individual basis by the 
registrar. The following criteria is applied in a competitive process: 

Minimum 2.8 college/university cumulative GPA (if GPA is based on less than 30 
credits, a 1,000 

minimum SAT score is also required) 

Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly 
recommended). 

A full day (6-8 hours) of documented service in a health care setting with an 
occupational therapist by the beginning of studies. 

Submission of a 500-word typed statement of personal and professional goals 



1 80 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Weekend College Professional Entry-Level Master's Degree 

Students who meet the following criteria will be considered for admission: 

A baccalaureate degree in another discipline from an accredited program with a 
minimum of a 2.8 cumulative grade point average. 

A certified occupational therapy assistant who has graduated from an accredited 
program with minimum of a 2.80 cumulative grade point average. 

Admissions candidates are required to submit: 

Two letters of reference (at least one from an occupational therapist is highly 
recommended). 

A full day (6-8 hours) of documented service in a health care setting with an 
occupational therapist by the beginning of studies. 

Submission of a 500-word, typed statement of personal and professional goals. 

Successful interview with an occupational therapy faculty member. All applications are 
competively reviewed prior to this phase. 

COTAs must submit evidence of current NBCOT certification, with one year of 
employment as a COTA highly desirable. 

English Language Proficiency 

If English is not your first language, or if English is not the primary language spoken in your 
home, you must submit the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The following are 
the minimum score requirements: 

Internet-based TOEFL exam (iBT): The Internet-based TOEFL has four subsections, with a 
grading scale for each section from 1 to 30 (30 being the highest score). Misericordia 
University will look closely at the score for each section rather than the total score. The 
minimum scores for each section are as follows: 



Writing: 


22 


Speaking: 


22 


Reading: 


22 


Listening: 


22 



Students should indicate on the registration form that they wish the test results to be sent 
directly to Misericordia University. The TOEFL code for Misericordia University is 2087. 

Fieldwork 

Fieldwork education is designed to provide occupational therapy students with opportunities to 
integrate academically acquired education with practice. It is during the students' experiences 
in fieldwork that they can learn, practice and refine skills of observation, evaluation, treatment 
planning and implementation, documentation and communication. In the fieldwork setting, the 
students begin to define their future role as practicing occupational therapists and can develop 
the necessary personal and professional skills essential in meeting the demands of this 
challenging profession. 

Level I and Level II Fieldwork is an essential part of an occupational therapy program's 
curriculum as established by the American Occupational Therapy Accreditation Council for 
Occupational Therapy Education. At Misericordia University, fieldwork education begins in the 
junior year for a weekday student and ends in the fall semester of the graduate year. For 
weekend college students, fieldwork education begins in the second year of the program and 
ends in the spring semester of the graduate year. 

Level I Fieldwork is integral to the academic courses offered in the occupational therapy 
curriculum. There is a Level I Fieldwork experience for each intervention course offered. 
Experiences in Level I Fieldwork include; observation, interaction with consumers and other 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 81 



professionals, opportunities to experience the intervention process under direct supervision, 
and evaluation of the student's performance in these areas. The experiential nature of the 
learning is a hallmark of Level I Fieldwork and carries the expectation of engagement with 
people in occupation across the life span continuum in a variety of settings. Students are 
primarily supervised by certified and licensed occupational therapists with at least one year 
experience. Students may also have the opportunity to be supervised by certified and 
licensed occupational therapy assistants and a variety of other health care professionals. 
Students are responsible for all costs incurred that are associated with fieldwork including but 
not limited to transportation, meals, and dress requirements. 

Level II Fieldwork begins after successful completion of all required academic coursework. It 
is the cumulative educational experience in which students have the opportunity to apply 
academically acquired knowledge in assessing, planning and implementing occupational 
therapy intervention programs for consumers in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional 
service settings. Students must complete six months of Level II Fieldwork experience and be 
supervised by a licensed and certified occupational therapist with at least one year of practice 
experience. Upon successful completion of all coursework, Level I and Level II Fieldwork, the 
student will qualify to take the NBCOT (National Board for Certification in Occupational 
Therapy) examination. Students are responsible for all costs incurred that are associated with 
fieldwork including but not limited to living arrangements, transportation, meals, and dress 
requirements. 

Fieldwork Education is managed by the Academic Coordinator of Fieldwork Education. For 
more information related to Fieldwork Education, contact Dawn M. Evans, MS, OTR/L, 
Academic Coordinator of Fieldwork Education at 570-674-6415 or e-mail at 
devans@misericordia.edu. 

Related Expenses 

Additional expenses for occupational therapy students normally include a lab fee, uniforms, 
name pins, school patches, and a certification examination fee. Students are required to 
purchase an online practice examination, which will be added to fees for the final year of the 
program. As part of professional 

development, students are expected to become members of the American Occupational 
Therapy Association and are encouraged to become members of the Pennsylvania 
Occupational Therapy Association (each Association has reduced student rates; details are 
available in the occupational therapy office). Students entering the program are required to 
join the American Occupational Therapy Association, with membership added to student fees. 
Attendance at professional conferences is encouraged as students continue their lifelong 
commitment to learning. Students should plan on regular use of a computer for course 
communications and assignments. There are several state-of-the-art computer laboratories on 
campus. 

Retention 

Retention requirements for the occupational therapy program can be found in the occupational 
therapy program guide. Retention criteria for overall GPA, major GPA, and individual course 
grade minimums vary at different levels of the program. Refer to the occupational therapy 
program guide for details. 

Degree and Options 

Upon successful completion of all requirements students in the weekday program and COTAs 
in the weekend program are issued a BS in health sciences and a MS in occupational therapy. 
Students with bachelors' degrees upon admission to the programs take relevant courses to be 
issued an MS in occupational therapy. There are several options available to students 
primarily in the weekday program for their undergraduate degree. Students can earn an 



1 82 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



undergraduate major in psychology by taking five additional courses in the spaces below 
marked "free electives," plus doing some of their fieldwork in a psychiatric setting. A 
specialization in pediatrics is also offered to students in the traditional weekday program. 
Minors in several disciplines are also options. Finally, minors are available in music, art, and 
dance at neighboring institutions through a cross registration agreement. 

Five Year Entry Level MS Weekday Program 

Sequence of Required Courses — Weekday Program 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 

PHY 117 Physics Introduction I 4 



MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


SOC101 


PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


MTH 115 


OT103 


Intro to OT 


3 


ENG 


or FA 


Core 




FA or 


ENG 


Core 


3 


OT103 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

PHY 1 1 8 Introductory Physics II 4 

Comparative Sociology 3 

Basic Statistics I 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 
Intro to OT 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 

BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology 4 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 6 

BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology 4 



OT205 


Occupation: Theories & 
Persp I 


3 


OT275 


Occupation: Theories & 
Persp II 


3 


OT220 


Human Developement I 


3 


OT221 


Human Development II 


3 


PSY/ 


Communication Skills 


3 


OT335 


Context and Environment 


3 


SWK 285 






PSY 290 


Psychopathology 


3 


OT320 


Impairments & Disabilities 


3 








Junior Year 











First Semester Total Credits 16 

OT312 Functional Anatomy 4 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 6 

OT313 Applied Neuroscience 4 



OT330 


Conceptual Foundations of 


3 


OT520 


Research Design in OT 3 




OT 




OT410 


Community based Practice I 2 


OT405 


Occ. Performance Analysis 


3 


OT510 


Adult/Geriatric Occupational 4 


OT407 


Clinical Skills 


3 




Performance Interventions I 




Elective 


3 


RLS 


Core 3 


Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


OT511 


Adult/Geriatric Occupational 
Performance Interventions II 


4 


OT512 


Pediatric Occupational 4 
Performance Interventions 


OT411 


Community Based Practice II 


1 


OT412 


Community Based Practice III 1 


OT433 


Evidence Based Practice in 


2 


HIS 


Core 3 




OTI 




OT690 


Research Project I 3 


PHL 


Core 


3 


PHL 


Core 3 


HIS 


Core 
Elective 


3 
3 




Graduate Year Elective 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 83 



Graduate Year 



First Semester Total Credits 14 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


OT601 


Level II Fieldwork I 


6 


OT570 


Management & 3 


OT602 


Level II Fieldwork II 


6 




Entrepreneurship 


OT633 


Evidence Based Practice in 


2 


OT630 


OT Issues and Trends 2 




OTII 




OT695 

FA 

RLS 


Research Project II 3 
Core 3 
Core 3 
Elective 3 








Total required for graduation 160 credits 



Three Year Entry-level MS Weekend Program- Overview 

The weekend program utilizes a three-year model, with classes meeting on alternating 
weekends year round. This program is specifically designed for individuals who possess a 
baccalaureate degree in another discipline. COTAs may meet the requirements for a 
bachelor's degree in health sciences by completing the prerequisite year and the first year of 
the professional curriculum. The weekend program presents professional occupational therapy 
coursework in an adult learning model to produce a holistic practitioner who has a strong 
background in the use of occupation and critical inquiry skills to advance the profession. Some 
courses include the use of Blackboard as a distance learning component, with reduced face to 
face meeting time. 

Three Year Entry Level MS Weekend Program 

Prerequisite Year for Individuals with an Associate Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 



First Semester Total Credits 13 

BIO 21 1 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 

PSY 290 Psychopathology 3 

ENG Core 3 

HIS Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 10 

BIO 212 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 

PHL Core 3 

RLS Core 3 



Summer 

MTH 115 
PHY 117 
FA Core 



Total Credits 13 

Statistics 3 

Physics Introduction I 4 

3 



First Year Professional 



First Semester Total Credits 9 

OT103 Intro to OT 3 

OT 220 Human Development 3 

OT 320 Impairments & Disabilities 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 9 

OT 205 Occupations I 3 

OT 221 Human Development II 3 

SWK 285 Communication Skills 3 



1 84 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Summer Total Credits 10 

OT 275 Occupations II 3 

OT 330 Conceptual Foundations 3 

OT312 Functional Anatomy 4 



Second Year Professional 



First Semester Total Credits 10 

OT313 Applied Neuroscience 4 

OT 405 Occupational Performance 3 

Analysis 
OT407 Clinical Skills 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 9 

OT410 Community-based Practice 2 

I 
OT510 Adult/Geriatric 4 

Occupational Performance 

Interventions I 
OT 520 Research Design in OT 3 



Summer 
OT335 

OT411 
OT433 
OT511 



Total Credits 10 
3 



Contextual Influences on 
Performance 

Community-based Practice II 
Evidence-based Practice in OT I 
Adult/Geriatric Occupational 
Performance Interventions II 



Third Year Professional 



First Semester Total Credits 8 

OT412 Community-based Practice 1 

III 
OT512 Pediatric Occupational 4 

Performance Interventions 
OT 690 Research Project 1 3 



Second Semester 
OT 601 Level 

OT 602 Level 



OT633 



Total Credits 14 
Fieldwork I 6 

Fieldwork II 6 



Evidence-based Practice in 
OTII 



Summer 
OT570 



Total Credits 8 
3 



Management & Entrepreneurship 

inOT 
OT 630 OT Issues and Trends 2 

OT 695 Research Project II 3 

Weekend College Prerequisites 

Prerequisite Year for Individuals with an Associate Degree 



Sequence of Required Courses 

First Semester Total Credits 13 

BIO 21 1 Anatomy & Physiology I 4 

PSY 290 Psychopathology 3 

ENG Core 3 

HIS Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 10 

BIO 212 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 



PHL Core 
RLS Core 






Bachelor's Degree Programs 185 



Summer Total Credits 13 

MTH115 Statistics 3 

PHY 1 1 7 Physics Introduction I 4 

FA Core 3 

First Year Professional 

First Semester Total Credits 9 Second Semester Total Credits 9 

OT103 Intro to OT 3 OT 205 Occupations I 3 

OT220 Human Development 3 OT 221 Human Development II 3 

OT 320 Impairments & Disabilities 3 SWK 285 Communication Skills 3 

Summer Total Credits 10 

OT 275 Occupations II 3 

OT 330 Conceptual Foundations 3 

OT312 Functional Anatomy 4 



Second Year Professional 

WEC students must complete the following prerequisite (cognate) classes before entering the 
professional phase of the program: 

4 credits - BIO 21 1 Anatomy & Physiology I 

4 credits - BIO 212 Anatomy & Physiology II 

3 credits - MTH 115 Statistics 

3 credits - PSY 290 Psychopathology 

3 credits - PHY 117 Physics Introduction I (with Lab) 

The occupational therapy department reserves the right to make changes in schedules, 
sequences, and policies as the need arises. 



Occupational Therapy Course Descriptions (OT) 

103 Introduction to Professional Behaviors in Occupational Therapy 3 credits 

The course will address an introduction into the profession of occupational therapy and 
the Misericordia University Occupational Therapy program curriculum, policies and 
procedures. Specific topics will include: American Occupational Therapy Association 
policies and documents, the OT Practice Framework and the history of the profession. 
The course will have students apply concepts from occupational therapy to their own 
learning and life experiences. 

Prerequisite: OT major. Spring; WEC: Fall 

205 Occupation: Theories and Perspectives I 3 credits 

An exploration of the biologic, psychologic, social, and cultural elements of occupational 
behavior are discussed. The relationship of occupation to the evolution of an individual 
sense of competence and autonomy, social efficacy and motivation, social role learning, 
and development of adaptational styles are explored. Through a series of laboratory and 
community experiential activities, students will enhance their personal activity repertoire 
as well as learn the process for activity analysis. 

Prerequisite: OT 103. Fall only 
1 86 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



220 Human Development Through Occupation I 3 credits 
In this course, development from birth through adolescence will be studied both from the 
viewpoints of psychology, occupational science and occupational therapy. An 
understanding of the biosocial, cognitive, psychosocial, and spiritual changes as a 
person ages will be presented. Engagement in human occupation and how it influences 
the developmental process will be explored. 

Prerequisites: OT 103. Fall only 

221 Human Development Through Occupation II 3 credits 
In this course, adult development will be studied both from the viewpoints of psychology, 
occupational science and occupational therapy. An understanding of the biosocial, 
cognitive, psychosocial, and spiritual changes as a person ages will be presented. 
Engagement in human occupation and how it influences the aging process will be 
explored. 

Prerequisite: OT 220. Spring only 

275 Occupation: Theories and Perspectives II 3 credits 

Through a variety of experiences in purposeful activity, students will explore the 
dimensions and characteristics of human occupation. This will include the real and 
symbolic aspects of the activity and its contribution to the development of a personally 
appropriate lifestyle. This course extends the concepts explored in OT 205 to include the 
extrapersonal dimension of activity. Through a series of classroom and community- 
based experiential activities, students expand their personal activity repertoire, their . 
activity leadership skills, and their understanding of activity analysis. 

Prerequisite: OT 205. Spring only 

312 Applied Functional Anatomy 4 credits 
This course will provide the student with a detailed understanding of the musculoskeletal 
anatomy of the limbs, trunk, and head in humans. Since this understanding is critical to 
enhance the ability of the student to work with clients with disabilities, it is considered as 
a foundation for the study of occupational therapy intervention. The focus of the course 
will be on the bones and muscles of the limbs and trunk, and how they work to produce 
movement. Case studies will be used to facilitate learning. The course will include some 
content on the nerves and blood supply to these organs, as they influence function. 

Prerequisites: BIO 21 1, BIO 212, OT 220, OT 221, PHY 107. Fall WEC: Summer 

313 Applied Neuroscience 4 credits 
Through exploration of case studies, the student learns normal and pathological 
anatomy and neurology, and how it relates to human function and dysfunction. Students 
will participate in guided exploration of the neurological and musculoskeletal systems, 
evaluating representative case models. In the laboratory component, students will learn 
various evaluation techniques that can be used to identify and evaluate dysfunction of 
neurologic systems, bones, or muscles. 

Prerequisites: Bio 211, Bio 212, OT 220, OT 221, PHY 107. Spring; WEC: Fall 

320 Impairments and Disabilities Influencing Occupational Performance 3 credits 
Through the study of medical terminology, International Classification of Functions, and 
the OT Practice Framework, the student learns a system of classification of impairments 
and disabilities. The consequences of diseases, injuries, or disorders and the implication 
that these have on the livelihood of individuals typically referred to occupational therapy 
for intervention will also be addressed. 

Prerequisite: OT 220/221. Fall, WEC: Fall 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 87 



330 Conceptual Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3 credits 

Students conduct an in-depth exploration of occupational therapy through the study of its 
history, philosophy, frames of reference, and leaders. Emphasis will be on the 
application, integration, and analysis of current and emerging theories and frames of 
reference that impact the occupational therapy process. 

Prerequisites: All 200 level courses. Fall, WEC: Summer 

335 Context and Environment 3 credits 

The course will explore the impact of the non-human components of the environment on 
the functional performance of individuals with disabilities, and environmental adaptations 
(including assistive technologies) that allow a person with a disability to function more 
fully in the environment. The course will examine the affect of lighting, temperature, 
visual and auditory stimuli, and physical structure on the cognitive, physical, and 
emotional performance of individuals with disabilities, and how these factors influence 
control, independence, and freedom of the individual. 

Prerequisites: SOC 101, OT 330, PHY 107, all 200 level OT courses Spring; WEC: 
Summer 

405 Occupational Performance Analysis 3 credits 

This course addresses the evaluation system used by occupational therapists in practice 
including the development of an occupational profile and an occupational performance 
analysis. Selected interview, observational, standardized, and non-standardized 
assessment instruments will be covered. 

Prerequisites: OT 320, OT 335. Fall, WEC: Fall 

407 Clinical Skills 3 credits 

Students will be introduced to mobility skills, splinting, therapeutic exercise, physical 
agent modalities, critical care issues, positioning and basic handling techniques, and 
professional behavior issues. This course is designed to prepare the student for in-depth 
analysis and application of intervention strategies that will be addressed in the OT 
Intervention Series. This course is integrated with course content from OT 405 OP 
Analysis. 

Prerequisites: OT 320. Fall, WEC: Fall 

410 Community-based Practice I 2 credits 
Students will be introduced to the topic of community based practice and emerging areas 
of practice within occupational therapy. Students will explore the changes that are 
occurring within the healthcare delivery system and address other non-medical models 
of practice. Community-based Practice I will focus on community-based mental 
healthcare settings. A fieldwork experience will be coordinated with the OT 510 
Occupational Therapy Intervention: Adults I. 

Corequisite: OT 511. Spring, WEC: Spring 

411 Community-based Practice II 1 credit 
Community-based Practice II will focus on community-based intervention strategies for 
older adults with physical and psychosocial dysfunction as well as the well-elderly 
dealing with age-related issues. Students will integrate and apply knowledge from OT 
Community-Based Practice I and focus on the needs of older adults living within the 
community. A fieldwork experience will be coordinated with the OT 51 1 Occupational 
Therapy Intervention: Adults II. 

Corequisite: OT 511. Fall, WEC: Summer 



1 88 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



412 Community-based Practice III 1 credit 

Community-based Practice III will focus on community-based intervention strategies for 
the pediatric population. Students will integrate and apply knowledge from OT 
Community-Based Practice I and II and focus on the needs of infants, children, and 
adolescents living within the community. A fieldwork experience will be coordinated with 
the OT 512 Occupational Therapy Intervention: Pediatrics. 

Corequisite: OT 512. Spring WEC: Fall 

430 Specialization Sequence: Sensory Integration 

This course is designed to augment the Intervention course series, particularly the 
Intervention I course. The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to implement 
the occupational therapy process with consumers affected by sensory integrative 
disorders and to be knowledgeable about factors that impact service delivery. In-class 
exercises and out-of-class assignments will be provided to improve students' skills and 
increase students' self-confidence with the material. This class should not be considered 
as a preparatory class for SI Certification. Enrollment in this course is usually limited to 
students pursuing the pediatric specialization track in the traditional program. 

Spring, fourth year 

433 Evidence-based Practice I 2 credits 

In Evidence-based Practice I students will be introduced to the topic of evidence-based 
practice to support the practice of occupational therapy. Students will develop a clinical 
question, gather current published evidence, complete a critical review of the evidence, 
and summarize and present the results of the critical appraisal process. 

Prerequisite: OT 520. Spring, WEC: Spring 

510 Adult/Geriatric Occupational Performance Interventions I 4 credits 
The Occupational Therapy Intervention Adults I and II course series is offered over two 
consecutive semesters in an integrated model which teaches intervention skills required 
by the practicing occupational therapist. The process of intervention which this course 
series emphasizes includes: screening, assessment, formulation of intervention plans, 
treatment implementation, discontinuation of services, and documentation of services. 
This is done in accordance with the profession's standards of practice and code of 
ethics. Occupational Therapy Intervention Adults I and II are sequential in nature with 
emphasis on various types of service delivery systems and the common conditions seen 
in clients from late adolescence through the rest of the life span. Intervention strategies 
are addressed according to the delivery system and client condition being examined. 
The content is divided into the following modules: psychosocial dysfunction/psychiatric 
conditions, orthopedic/musculoskeletal conditions, neurorehabilitation, cardiopulmonary 
conditions and critical care, oncology, and other conditions. Due to the sequential nature 
of Intervention Adults I and II, textbooks are combined for both courses and there will be 
some overlap, continuation, and sharing of information. 

Prerequisites: OT 405, OT 407. Spring, WEC; Spring 

511 Adult/Geriatric Occupational Performance Interventions II 4 credits 
The Occupational Therapy Intervention Adults I and II course series is offered over two 
consecutive semesters in an integrated model which teaches intervention skills required 
by the practicing occupational therapist. The process of intervention which this course 
series emphasizes includes: screening, assessment, formulation of intervention plans, 
treatment implementation, discontinuation of services, and documentation of services. 
This is done in accordance with the profession's standards of practice and code of 
ethics. Occupational Therapy Intervention Adults I and II are sequential in nature with 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 1 89 



emphasis on various types of service delivery systems and the common conditions seen 
in clients from late adolescence through the rest of the life span. Intervention strategies 
are addressed according to the delivery system and client condition being examined. 
The content is divided into the following modules: psychosocial dysfunction/psychiatric 
conditions, orthopedic/musculoskeletal conditions, neurorehabilitation, cardiopulmonary 
conditions and critical care, oncology, and other conditions. Due to the sequential nature 
of Intervention Adults I and II, textbooks are combined for both courses and there will be 
some overlap, continuation, and sharing of information. 

Prerequisites: OT 510. Fall, WEC: Summer 

512 Pediatric Occupational Performance Interventions 4 credits 

This course will focus on occupational therapy intervention strategies for pediatric 
populations. Models of practice, theories, and frames of reference guide the intervention 
process for individuals whose occupational performance is affected by various 
developmental, physical, and psychosocial conditions. Screening, assessment, 
formulation of intervention plans, treatment implementation, discontinuation of services, 
and documentation of services are all aspects covered in the course. This is done in 
accordance with the profession's standards of practice and code of ethics. 

Prerequisite: OT 405, OT 407, OT 510/511. Spring, WEC: Fall 

520 Research Design in Occupational Therapy 3 credits 

This course presents the principles and processes involved in research. Qualitative and 
quantitative approaches are reviewed and analyzed relative to their strengths, 
limitations, and practical uses. The application of appropriate research methods to 
problems worthy of study is stressed. The student will complete a research proposal as 
part of this course. 

Prerequisites: MTH 115, OT 405, OT 407. Fall only; WEC: Spring 

630 Occupational Therapy Issues and Trends 3 credits 

Students explore, discuss and critically analyze issues affecting occupational therapy 
practice including reimbursement, role delineation, professional autonomy, legislation, 
health care systems, and managed care. 

Prerequisites: All 100-500 level OT courses; Co-requisite: OT 602. Spring; WEC: 
Summer 

570 Occupational Therapy Management and Supervision 3 credits 

The occupational therapist's role in financial management, human resource 
management, staff development, quality assurance, program management, and 
evaluation are explored. There is special emphasis on supervisory processes in 
facilitating professional growth and development, and management of COTAs and 
OTAs. Components of program planning, needs assessments, data collection and 
analysis, and resource allocation are introduced. 

Prerequisites: All 100, 200, 300 level OT courses, intervention series I and II 
Corequisites: OT 424, OT 520, OT 524, OT 724. Spring; WEC: Fall 



1 90 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



601 Level II Fieldwork I 6 credits 
This practical educational experience is designed to integrate and apply an academically 
acquired body of knowledge. There is particular emphasis on the development of clinical 
reasoning; the transmission of the values, beliefs, and ethical commitments of 
occupational therapy; communication of professional behaviors; and the development 
and expansion of a repertoire of occupational therapy assessments and intervention 
methodologies. This is a three month experience. 

Prerequisites: All 100, 200, 300 level OT courses, all intervention series courses. OT 
570 and by permission of the fieldwork coordinator. Summer; WEC: Spring 

602 Level II Fieldwork II 6 credits 
This three-month internship emphasizes the integration and application of an 
academically acquired body of knowledge and research enabling the student to achieve 
a level of competence in direct care that is congruent with the standards of entry-level 
practice of the profession of occupational therapy. Students must take this class as a 
follow-up class to OT 601 in order to meet the educational prerequisites to graduate and 
to be eligible to sit for the examination offered by the National Board for Certification in 
Occupational Therapy 

Prerequisites: All 100, 200, 300 level OT courses, all intervention series courses, OT 
570, OT 601 and by permission of the fieldwork coordinator. Fall; WEC: Spring 

610 Elective: Special Topics in Occupational Therapy Practice 3 credits 

Specialized areas of occupational therapy practice will be discussed; these will include, 
but are not limited to, hand therapy, sign language, assessment in pediatric practice, 
pediatric splinting, introduction to neuordevelopmental intervention techniques, and a 
series of courses offered in other disciplines within the College of Health Sciences. 
Topics vary each year depending upon the student interest and the availability of faculty 
with professional specialty expertise. 

Prerequisite: By permission of the instructor. Spring; WEC: Summer 

620 Analysis of Occupational Therapy Theories and Practice Models 3 credits 

Students conduct an in-depth study of theory development and analysis as it relates to 
macro and micro models of occupational therapy practice. This includes a 
comprehensive comparative analysis of frames of reference in differing health care 
delivery systems and ongoing research applications employed to validate the 
occupational therapy process. 

Prerequisites: AII-500 level OT courses; Corequisite: OT 601. Spring; WEC: Summer 

633 Evidence-based Practice II 2 credits 

Students will apply knowledge from OT Evidence-based Practice I and complete an in- 
depth evidence-based project related to occupational therapy practice. Students will 
develop a clinical question (relevant and applicable to a Level II Fieldwork placement), 
gather current published evidence, complete a critical review of the evidence, and 
summarize and present the results of the critical appraisal process. This course is online. 

Prerequisite: OT 433 

Co-requisite: OT 601 or 602 Completed during Level II Fieldwork 

690 Research Project I 3 credits 

Students will begin a research project that contributes to the knowledge-base of 
occupational therapy; the outcome will include a paper acceptable for publication in a 
professional journal. 

Prerequisites: MTH 115, OT 520. Spring; WEC: Summer 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 191 



695 Research Project II 3 credits 

Students will complete a research project that contributes to the knowledge-base of 
occupational therapy; the outcome will include a paper acceptable for publication in a 
professional journal. 

Prerequisite: OT 690. Spring; WEC: Fall 



Philosophy Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BA, Philosophy 

Department Chair Matthew L. Swanson, PhD 

Faculty 

Julie Kuhlken, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, BS, BA. MA Stanford University; MA, PhD 
Middlesex University 

Mark Painter, Professor of Philosophy, BA Evergreen State College; MA University of North 
Texas; PhD University of Missouri 

Melanie Shepherd, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, BA Hanover College, PhD The 
Pennsylvania State University 

Matthew L. Swanson, Associate Professor of Philosophy, BA, MA, PhD University of Missouri 

This program presents philosophy as an integral life activity growing out of a deep and 
passionate concern with life and its meaning and the recognition that the traumatic changes 
that mark an age and affect all people involve philosophical issues. In its academic mode, 
philosophy is noted for cultivating those dispositions and aptitudes requisite for critical thinking 
and sound judgment. In this function, it provides the strongest preparation for rational living 
and intelligent participation in contemporary discussions about issues such as freedom, 
justice, personal authenticity, morality, and political legitimacy. 

Pre-Law Specialization 

The pre-law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of American Law 
Schools, which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts 
background. The program represents sound preparation for the Law School Admissions Test 
and the study of law. 

General Requirements 

Philosophy majors must complete 30 credits in philosophy beyond the six credits that satisfy 
core requirements, and maintain a 2.00 (C grade) average overall and in the major. They are 
also required to take Introduction to Logic (PHL 105), Introduction to Ethics (PHL 102) and the 
four upper level historical courses: Ancient Philosophy (PHL 320), Early Modern Philosophy 
(PHL 330), 19th Century Philosophy (PHL 340) and 20th Century Philosophy (PHL 430). A 
proficiency in a foreign language is advisable. 

A large number of free electives allows students flexibility in personalizing their studies. Majors 
can, with approval of their advisors, either select from various minors and areas of 
concentration, pursue double majors, or select clusters of advanced courses from different 
disciplines in pursuit of more integrated understanding. 



1 92 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Philosophy BA Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL100C Introduction to 3 
Philosophy 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL 102M Introduction to Ethics 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester 


Total Credits 15 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 


3 




Core 


3 




Core 


3 




Core 


3 




Core 


3 


PHL105M 


Introduction to Logic 


3 


PHL 


Free elective 


3 


PHL 


Free elective 


3 


PHL 


Free elective 


3 



Junior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL 320 Ancient Philosophy 3 



PHL 



Free elective 
Free elective 
Free elective 
Core 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL 330 Early Modern Philosophy 3 



Free elective 
Free elective 
Free elective 
Core 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL 340 19th Century Philosophy 3 



PHL 



Free elective 
Free elective 
Free elective 
Free elective 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL 430 20th Century Philosophy 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 193 



Philosophy, Pre-law 

Degree BA, Philosophy 

Department Chair Matthew L. Swanson, PhD 

For information contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 

The pre-law specialization was developed in accordance with the Association of American Law 
Schools, which recommends that prospective law students have a broad liberal arts 
background. The program represents sound preparation for the Law School Admission Test 
and the graduate study of law. 

The program has been carefully designed to develop ability in expression and analytical 
comprehension, to afford basic information about human institutions and values, and to 
cultivate the ability to think creatively and critically with thoroughness and independence. 

Students may choose to major in English, history, philosophy, or interdisciplinary studies. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the major program requirements and the pre-law program 
requirements, the student will earn a bachelor of arts degree in English, history, philosophy, or 
interdisciplinary studies with a pre-law specialization. 

Pre-law students must fulfill the general and specific requirements of the university and of the 
specific major as stated in the catalog for retention in the program and for recommendation to 
law school. 

Pre-law students should register with the pre-law director, who can provide advice on course 
selection and information concerning the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and law schools 
can be obtained. 

Philosophy Prelaw BA Degree 

Suggested Course of Study, Pre-professional Curriculum 

First Year 



First Semester 



Total Credits 3 



POL 100 American National < 

Government 

Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 251 Law Seminar I 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 103 Global Politics 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 252 Law Seminar II 3 



Junior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 405 American Constitutional 3 

Law I 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 406 American Constitutional Law 3 
II 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 6 

POL 450 Law Internship I 3 

BUS 352 Business Law 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 3 

POL 451 Law Internship II 3 

POL Free Elective 3 

Total required for graduation 120. 



194 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Philosophy Course Descriptions (PHL) 

100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits 

This course examines those pivotal philosophies that have most significantly shaped the 
evolution of Western culture. Its aim is to critically reflect on the defining ideas of both 
tradition and the modern world, and to explore the specific challenges modernity poses 
to traditional thought. This course is a core requirement, and a prerequisite for all other 
philosophy courses. It is also offered in the honors colloquia. 

Fall and Spring 

102 Introduction to Ethics 3 credits 

This course investigates the basic issues and problems encountered in the field of 
ethical theory. These issues include the prescriptive/descriptive distinction, the 
motivation for morality, virtue vs. rule-based ethics, deontological vs. consequentialist 
theories, moral psychology, and meta-ethical analysis. As a philosophical reflection upon 
our moral experience special emphasis is placed upon rational justification for the 
stances we take in these issues. 

Fall and Spring 

105 Introduction to Logic 3 credits 

This course is intended to provide students with the skills needed to apply logical 
principles, techniques of critical thought, and argumentation to the analysis of their own 
words and the words of others. Emphasis will be on assessing the legitimacy of 
arguments, detecting common fallacies, evaluating evidence and improving skills in 
reasoning. 

1 1 1 Makers of the Modern Mind (Honors) 3 credits 

This course examines the pivotal philosophies from Descartes to Heidegger that have 
most significantly shaped the evolution of modern Western culture. Its aim is to critically 
reflect on the defining ideas for both tradition and modernity so that students may 
explore the meanings of modernity. 

Prerequisite: Reserved for Honors Students. Spring 

202 Environmental Philosophy 3 credits 

This course is a survey of the fundamental principles and traditions underlying what we 
call today "environmental philosophy." Students will explore the roots of our 
contemporary ideas about nature and ecology, animal rights, whether or not nature has 
intrinsic or merely instrumental value, ecofeminism, "deep" ecology, non-western 
perspectives on the environment, population, hunger, global warming and the Gaia 
theory that the planet is a living organism. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

205 Medieval Philosophy 3 credits 

This course covers the philosophical discussions and debates that dominated the 
interchange between philosophical and theological discourse in the Latin West from the 
1 1th to the 16th centuries. In the speculations of medieval philosophers, we find the 
constitutive elements of Western culture and philosophy. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 195 



210 Philosophy of Person 3 credits 

A dominantly phenomenological approach to analyzing the existential structures that 
constitute a person. Exploration of the possibilities for personal growth and evaluation of 
the various social forces that limit these possibilities. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

220 Philosophy and Literature 3 credits 

The exploration of philosophical issues through the medium of literature, as distinct from 
the argumentative format common to straight forward philosophical discourse. Major 
emphasis is on tracing the changing conceptions of human nature and individual human 
action in the context of changing conceptions of nature, the human community, political 
legitimacy and morality. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

223 Social Ethics 3 credits 

An examination of the leading ethical theories in normative discourse, and their 
application to the most urgent social problems that address us. Topics such as poverty, 
war, animal rights, economic justice, and the morality of sex and reproduction are 
debated. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

257 Philosophy of Religion 3 credits 

An inquiry into the nature of religion and the objects of thought and feeling associated 
with religion, such as the nature and existence of God, the nature of religious experience 
and symbolism, evil, creation, and immortality. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

261 Philosophy of Women 3 credits 

A philosophical examination of the literature and central issues of the women's liberation 
movement. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

270 Social and Political Philosophy 3 credits 

An examination of the key issues in the history of Western social and political 
philosophy. These include the nature and purpose of government, political legitimacy, 
the relationship between theories of human nature and political systems, and the 
evolution of rights. 

Prerequisite: PHL 100 

310 Medical Ethics 3 credits 

This course in applied ethics explores the ethical questions related to modern science 
and the health professions. Topics such as abortion, human experimentation, genetic 
engineering, patient-rights, and the delivery of health care are analyzed. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 



1 96 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



320 Ancient Philosophy 3 credits 

A examination of the history of philosophy from the origins of scientific thought in Asia 
Minor through the synthesis of St. Augustine. Major emphasis is on Plato and Aristotle. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 plus any other 100 or 200 level course 

330 Early Modern Philosophy 3 credits 

An examination of the history of philosophy from the Renaissance through the early 19th 
century. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism are studied in relationship to 
Kant and his attempt to synthesize the two. Emphasis will be on the shift from an 
ancient/medieval world view, and how this shift sets the stage for contemporary issues. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 

340 19th Century Philosophy 3 credits 

This course investigates the Enlightenment ideal of personhood, particularly as it is 
expressed in Kant's critical project, and the various 19th century reactions to this ideal as 
formulated in the works of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Dostoevsky. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 

410 Philosophy of Law 3 credits 

The focus is on four basic questions: What is the fundamental nature of law? What are 
the appropriate limits of legal regulations? How should the notion of responsibility be 
defined in the criminal law? And how and to what extent is punishment justifiable? 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 

430 20th Century Philosophy 3 credits 

This course examines the following dominant 20th century philosophical methodologies: 
pragmatism, phenomenology, logical positivism, linguistic analysis, and existentialism. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 

440 Economics of Freedom and Justice 3 credits 

A dramatic tour through those history-shaping ideas that are of immediate relevance to a 
world torn by economic problems and debates about conflicting notions of social justice. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course 

480 Independent Study 3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

(On demand) 

485 Special Topics 3 credits 

Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration 
information. 

Prerequisites: PHL 100 and any other 100 or 200 level course. (On demand) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 197 



Pre-Doctor of Physical Therapy Program 

College of Health Sciences 

Degree DPT, Doctor of Physical Therapy 

Department Chair Susan P. Barker, PhD 

Faculty 

Susan P. Barker, Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Pennsylvania; MS Temple 
University; PhD Drexel University 

Richard Haydt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy, BS Wilkes College; MSPT Beaver 
College; DPT University of St. Augustine 

Diane E. Madras, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BA University of Missouri-Columbia; 
MS Columbia University; PhD Louisiana State University 

Kelley A. Moran, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Delaware; MS Arcadia 
University; DPT Temple University 

Michael Moran, Professor of Physical Therapy, BS State University of New York at Stony Brook; 
MS University of Scranton; ScD Nova University 

Maureen Pascal, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Pennsylvania; MS 
Boston University; DPT Temple University 

Steven Pheasant, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BA Wittenberg University; MS Arcadia 
University; PhD University of Toledo 

Amy Tremback-Ball, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS, MS College Misericordia; PhD 
Marywood University 

The Physical Therapy program is a 6-1/2 year professional program resulting in a bachelor's 
degree and a doctor of physical therapy degree. During the first 3-1/2 years, the student 
completes the requirements for a bachelor's degree in an area of the student's choice 
http://www.misericordia.edu/academics/. (For a list of the bachelor's degrees offered at 
Misericordia, go to http://www.misericordia.edu/academics/.) The student enters the 
professional curriculum in the spring semester of the fourth year. The professional curriculum 
includes eight semesters. Plans of study are available on the Physical Therapy website, at 
http://www.misericordia.edu/pt. 

Mission 

It is the mission of the physical therapy education program at Misericordia University to 
provide professional physical therapy education opportunities and to help meet physical 
therapy health care needs. 

The physical therapy program is committed to providing an education program which produces 
competent physical therapy practitioners who are critical thinkers and educated consumers of 
research and which prepares graduates for productive careers in physical therapy and as 
advocates for, and participants in, life long learning. 

As an entry-level professional post baccalaureate program, the physical therapy curriculum 
reflects a commitment to the complementary relationship between liberal arts and professional 
studies which enables graduates to adapt to and deal with constantly evolving societal and 
professional needs. 

The physical therapy program's commitment to providing quality physical therapy education 
expresses the founding Sisters' values and attitudes of justice, mercy, service and hospitality. 

Philosophy 

The physical therapy education program is based on the belief that graduates of entry-level 
physical therapy programs should possess the clinical decision making and problem solving 
skills which enable them to function as reflective practitioners in the contemporary, dynamic 
health care system. Physical therapists need to be sensitive to the needs of a culturally 



1 98 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



diverse society as evident in their interactions with clients, families, health care colleagues and 
the community in which they practice. 

An educational program for physical therapists should reflect the concepts of androgogy (adult 
education) to include problem solving, critical thinking and analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and 
integration of theory and evidence in practice, clinical decision making, mentoring and self- 
directed learning. 

Physical therapists should integrate the core values of the profession in all professional 
activities. While capable of autonomous practice, they should have the ability and desire to 
remain open to input from and collaboration with other health care professionals. 

A physical therapy entry-level education program prepares physical therapy generalists but 
provides graduates with the tools which enable them to develop specialty expertise through 
the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills and a holistic approach to health 
care. 

The academic and clinical faculty and the academic and clinical education environments must 
reflect and foster professional values and behaviors. The academic and clinical faculty and 
curriculum components must be inextricably linked for the provision of a professional 
education program that prepares competent health care practitioners. 

A diverse faculty whose members have responsibilities and activities consistent with their 
areas of teaching and scholarly expertise strengthens and enhances a professional education 
program. 

Student Goals 

Graduates of the program will: 

1 . Be prepared to practice as physical therapist generalists capable of contemporary, 
reflective, competent, legal, and ethical practice, 

2. Value the relevance of, and contribute to, evidence for the validation and advancement 
of the art and science of physical therapy, 

3. Accept the roles and responsibilities of physical therapists as professionally 
autonomous practitioners within the health care system, 

4. Accept the responsibility for education of self, the community, profession, clients, and 
colleagues in the health care system, 

5. Value and foster communication and interaction with colleagues for the benefit of 
optimal service to clients, and 

6. Respect and respond to contemporary bio-psycho-social diversity in interactions with 
clients, families, colleagues and the community. 



Psychology Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree BS, Psychology 

Department Chair Mamie Hiester, PhD 

Faculty 

Mamie Hiester, Associate Professor of Psychology, BA Drew University; PhD University of 
Minnesota 

George Hunter, Associate Professor of Psychology, BA Siena College; MS Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute; MA, PhD Princeton University 

Charles A. LaJeunesse, Professor of Psychology, BS, MEd, PhD University of Missouri 






Bachelor's Degree Programs 199 



Alicia Nordstrom, Assistant Professor of Psychology, BA University of Rochester; MS Purdue 
University; PhD Pennsylvania State University 

Ryan O'Loughlin, Assistant Professor of Psychology, BA Quinnipiac University; MA University of 
Rochester; PhD University of Rochester 

Introduction 

The study of psychology enhances one's knowledge and understanding of human behavior, 
mental processes, and social interaction. As our society becomes increasingly diverse and our 
economy more global, this knowledge and understanding will be necessary for success in the 
rapidly changing workplace. Therefore, the psychology major is relevant to any occupation that 
involves interaction with others. It prepares students who wish to obtain baccalaureate-level 
positions, as well as those who wish to pursue graduate study in psychology or related fields. 

The field of psychology is exceedingly diverse and career options within the field are 
numerous. Therefore, the psychology major was designed with two goals in mind. First, in 
order to ensure a solid background in the methods, theories, and content of the discipline of 
psychology, all majors must take a required core of psychology courses. Second, great 
flexibility is built into our curriculum to allow students to tailor a program of study that best 
meets their individual interests and career goals. 

Goals and Objectives 

The psychology department has adopted the goals and objectives for undergraduate 
psychology programs specified by the American Psychological Association: 

1 . Knowledge Base of Psychology 

Students will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, 
empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology. 

2. Research Methods in Psychology 

Students will understand and apply basic research methods in psychology, including 
research design, data analysis, and interpretation. 

3. Critical Thinking Skills in Psychology 

Students will respect and use critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and, when 
possible, the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental 
processes. 

4. Application of Psychology 

Students will understand and apply psychological principles to personal, social, and 
organizational issues. 

5. Values in Psychology 

Students will be able to weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect 
other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline. 

6. Information and Technological Literacy 

Students will demonstrate information competence and the ability to use computers 
and other technology for many purposes. 

7. Communication Skills 

Students will be able to communicate effectively in a variety of formats. 

8. Sociocultural and International Awareness 

Students will recognize, understand, and respect the complexity of sociocultural and 
international diversity. 

9. Personal Development 

Students will develop insight into their own and others' behavior and mental processes 
and apply effective strategies for self-management and self-improvement. 

10. Career Planning and Development 



200 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Students will emerge from the major with realistic ideas about how to implement their 
psychological knowledge, skills, and values in occupational pursuits in a variety of settings. 

Admissions Requirements: 

Incoming students seeking admission as psychology majors must meet the university's 
general admissions requirements as stated in this catalog. 

Requirements 

In addition to the core curriculum, which includes Introduction to Psychology, students are 
required to complete at least 43 credits in psychology and three credits in Sociology (SOC 221 
Cultural Minorities). The 43 credits in psychology must include the following courses: PSY 101 
(Introductory Seminar), PSY 200 (Career Seminar), PSY 232 (Research Methods), or PSY 233 
(Advanced Research Methods), PSY 250 (Social Psychology), PSY 275 (Child & Adolescent 
Psychology) or PSY 277 (Adult Development and Aging), PSY 285 (Communication Skills), 
PSY 290 (Psychopathology) or PSY 332 (Child Psychopathology), PSY 301 (Cognitive 
Psychology), PSY 303 (Biological Psychology), PSY 475 (Practicum) or PSY 490 
(Independent Research), PSY 470 (Advanced Seminar in Psychology), one 
Biological/Cognitive Elective, one Social/Developmental Elective, and one Clinical/Counseling 
Elective. Students take a remaining 30 credits in free electives, which allows them to complete 
courses, minors, and/or certificate programs that are consistent with their interests and career 
goals. 

Students must achieve grades of "C-" or above in all required psychology courses. If a student 
earns a "D" or "F" in any required psychology course he/she must repeat that course and earn 
a "C-" or above. 

Psychology BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 Second Semester Total Credits 16 

PSY 123 Introduction to Psychology 3 SOC 101 Comparative Sociology 3 

General Biology II 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Basic Statistics 3 

Introductory Seminar 1 



BIO 103 


General Biology I 


3 


BIO 104 


HIS 


Core 


3 


HIS 


PHL 


Core 


3 


PHL 


MTH 


Core Bank I 


3 


MTH 115 
PSY 101 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


FA 


Core 


3 


FA 


Core 3 


ENG 


Core 


3 


ENG 


Core 3 


PSY200 


Career Seminar 


2 


PSY 250 


Social Psychology 3 


PSY 275 


Child & Adolescent 
Psychology 


3 


PSY 233 


Advanced Research 3 
Methods 


OR 


Adult Development & Aging 




PSY 285 


Communication Skills 3 


PSY 277 










SOC 221 


Cultural Minorities 


3 






PSY 232 


Research Methods 


3 







Bachelor's Degree Programs 20 1 



Junior Year 



First Semester 
RLS 

PSY 303 
PSY 290 
or PSY 332 



Total Credits 15 
Core 

Biological Psychology 
Psychopathology 
Child Psychopathology 
Free elective 
Free elective 



5 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


3 


RLS 


Core 3 


3 


PSY 301 


Cognitive Psychology 4 


3 


PSY 


Social/Developmental 3 
Elective 


3 
3 


PSY 


Clinical/Counseling 3 

Elective 

Free elective 3 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


PSY 475 


Practicum in Psychology 


3 


PSY 470 


Advanced Seminar in 3 


or PSY 490 


Independent Research 






Psychology 


PSY 


Biological/Cognitive 
Elective 


3 




Free elective 3 
Free elective 3 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 3 




Free elective 


3 




Free elective 3 




Free elective 


3 






Electives 











Developmental/Social Electives: PSY 224, PSY 275 OR PSY 277 (if not taken as required 
course), PSY 310, PSY 425, PSY 435 

Clinical/Counseling Electives: PSY 225, PSY 290 OR PSY 332 (if not taken as required 
course), PSY 315, , PSY 325, PSY 450, PSY 452, PSY 455 

Biological/Cognitive Electives: PSY 302, PSY 304, PSY 305, PSY 306 

* Certain Special Topics courses (PSY 381) may be included in the above categories if 
specified by the department at the time the course is offered. 

Total required for graduation 124 credits 



Mental Health Interventions Certificate 

The psychology department also offers a mental health interventions certificate (21 credits) for 
students interested in pursuing mental health careers. Students can choose either a child or 
adult track, depending on the population with which they are interested in working. See a list of 
requirements, page 306. 



202 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Psychology Course Descriptions (PSY) 

101 Introductory Seminar 1 credit 

Focus is primarily on the market opportunities with those stopping at a bachelor's degree 
in psychology, a master's degree in psychology or related field, and for those pursuing a 
doctorate in psychology or a related field. Also an introduction to our program, related 
clubs, faculty and other topics related to being a psychology major. 

Spring only 

123 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits 

A survey of the science of contemporary psychology, its methods, findings, theoretical 
foundations and practical applications. Topics include biological basis of behavior, 
developmental processes, perception, learning, motivation, personality, social behavior 
and abnormal behavior. 

Fall and Spring 

200 Career Seminar 2 credits 

Designed to help psychology majors find their career goals through the use of 
technologies related to career decision-making. This seminar plays out in three phases: 
1) assessing students' career-related interests, skills, values and personality; 2) 
investigating into and choosing career paths that match the students' interests, skills, 
values and personality; and 3) planning how to enter their most favored career path. 

Prerequisite: PSY 101, Introductory Seminar or permission of instructor. 
Fall only 

224 Organizational and Industrial Psychology 3 credits 

Investigation of organizational behavior, personnel and industrial psychology, with 
emphasis on utilization of basic psychological theory to make organizations more 
effective. Topics include personnel selection, performance appraisal, training employees 
and managers, leadership and supervision, communication, motivation attitudes and job 
satisfaction. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123 or permission of instructor. Spring odd years 



225 Psychology of Adjustment 

This course invites students to learn more about the nature of adjustment from a psycho- 
socio-cultural approach that includes culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender in 
considering adjustment in our over-stimulating, fast-paced world. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123 Spring even years 

232 Research Methods 3 credits 

Development of an appreciation for the scientific method as applied to the behavioral 
sciences. The language of science, concepts, propositions, hypotheses, models, 
theories and empirical laws. Analysis of the concepts of experimental, correlational and 
case study methods. Prepare skills in conducting scientific literature reviews and survey 
research. 

Prerequisites: PSY 123, MTH 115. Fall and Spring 






Bachelor's Degree Programs 203 



233 Advanced Research Methods 3 credits 

This course is the second of a two-semester sequence of research related courses 
required of all psychology majors. The goal of the course is to help students develop the 
skills necessary to conduct research in psychology. Students will learn how to conduct 
research from identifying a problem to interpreting results. These skills will be developed 
through the completion of assigned laboratory exercises and a small independent 
research project. 

Prerequisite: PSY 232. Spring only 

250 Social Psychology 3 credits 

Study of the relationships between individuals, and between individuals and groups or 
institutions. Topics include attribution of responsibility, interpersonal attraction, social 
influence, attitude change, characteristics and effects of crowds, and determinants of 
behavior. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall and Spring 

275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 credits 

Study of the relationship between physiological and psychological growth of the 
individual from infancy through adolescence. Emphasis on the theoretical formulations of 
child and adolescent development relative to emotional and cognitive processes. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall and Spring 

277 Adult Development and Aging 3 credits 

This course will provide an overview of adult development from early adulthood through 
death and will focus on both normative changes and individual differences. Topics to be 
discussed include: biological changes, changes in health and health habits, cognitive 
and intellectual changes, sex roles and family roles, work and work roles, development 
of relationships, changes in personality and motives, mental health and 
psychopathology, and death and dying. Developmental theories, models, and research 
methods will also be discussed. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Spring odd years 

285 Communication Skills: Interviewing and Recording Techniques 3 credits 

Development of skills that may be useful in working directly with clients and others, 
including listening for emotions, monitoring one's own reactions and responses, and 
building a client-worker relationship, which can foster constructive change in the client. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall and Spring 

290 Psychopathology (formerly PSY430 Abnormal Psychology) 3 credits 

Study of both professional and popular theories regarding mental illness and abnormal 
behavior. Exploration of chronology of abnormal behavior theories and treatments from 
demonology and phrenology to psychophysiology and chemotherapy, from madness and 
demonic possession to modern day viewpoints. Comparative study of the medical, 
behavioral and social models of mental disorder. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall and Spring 



204 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



301 Cognitive Psychology 4 credits 
This course will cover the techniques and findings of modern cognitive psychology, as 
well as the theoretical issues and explanatory models of complex mental processes. 
Potential topics include: thinking, problem-solving, creativity, memory, attention, 
language, mental imagery, cognitive development, and the neural basis of cognition. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: PSY 232. Spring only 

302 Learning 3 credits 
A survey of current and traditional research findings and theories related to classical, 
operant, and observational learning. Non-associative forms of learning and the 
application of learning principles in behavior modification will also be discussed. 

Prerequisite: PSY 232. Spring even years 

303 Biological Psychology 3 credits 
This course surveys the recent advances in understanding how the brain works and how 
it controls behavior. Beginning with the basics of the structure and functioning of the 
nervous system, students explore the biological bases of topics that have long been of 
interest to psychologists. These topics include: Sensation and perception, motivation and 
emotion, learning and memory, and abnormal behavior and its treatments.. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall only 

304 Sensation and Perception 3 credits 
This course deals with how we construct a conception of physical reality from sensory 
experience. While the primary focus will be on vision and hearing, the chemical senses 
(taste and smell) and the somatosenses (touch, temperature, vibration, etc.) will also be 
addressed. Students will cover the anatomy and physiology of the various sensory 
receptors, the neural mechanisms of sensation, sensory representation in the brain, as 
well as the phenomenological experience of perception. Topics will include the ways in which 
illusions can fool our senses and what they tell us about how our sensory systems work. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Spring odd years 

305 Psychopharmacology 3 credits 
This course explores what is currently known about the neurobiology of psychiatric 
disorders and the use of psychoactive drugs to treat them. Starting with the basics of the 
brain/behavior relationship and principles of pharmacology, we will cover the symptoms 
and treatment of the affective disorders, anxiety disorders and the schizophrenias, 
among others. Also included will be the psychological aspects and pharmacotherapy of 
the neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, and 
Alzheimer's disease. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall even years 

306 Drugs and Behavior 3 credits 
Drug abuse is our nation's number one health and social problem. In this course 
students will examine the use and abuse of drugs from many perspectives: social, 
historical, legal, medical, pharmacological and psychological. Beginning with a basic 
coverage of how the brain controls behavior, we will look at how drugs interact with the 
brain to have such powerful effects on behavior. Topics will include the medical use of 
drugs (including over-the-counter and psychotherapeutic drugs), the illegal abuse of 
drugs like heroine and cocaine, and the use and abuse of legal drugs such as caffeine, 
nicotine and alcohol. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall odd years 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 205 



310 Gender Studies 3 credits 

Focuses on gender issues from the perspective of different disciplines. Specific topics 
may include: biological, social, and cultural determinants of gender differences, gender 
roles in the family, philosophical views of men and women, gender in the classroom, 
gender issues in the workplace, gender issues in the health professions, and men, 
women and power. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall odd years 

315 Psychological Assessment (formerly PSY 280 Tests and Measurements) 3 
credits 

Development of skills necessary to determine the adequacy of testing instruments. 
Topics include personality measures, interest tests, IQ scales, achievement tests and 
aptitude tests. Summary of measurement statistics provided, but students are 
encouraged to take MTH 115 Basic Statistics, as background. 

Prerequisite: PSY 232. Fall odd years 

325 Autism Spectrum Disorder 3 credits 

This course will review the history of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), identify the 
characteristics of each disorder, as well as diagnostic criteria and procedures for 
diagnosis. Students will learn about the importance of early identification and detection, 
and will learn about research-based assessment tools and behavioral interventions used 
to treat ASD. 

Prerequiste: PSY 123. Spring even years 

332 Childhood Psychopathology (formerly PSY 432, Developmental 

Psychopathology) 3 credits 

This course will focus on the nature, causes, course, and treatment of various child and 
adolescent disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning 
disabilities, conduct disorder, autism, childhood depression, anxiety disorders in children, 
and eating disorders. These disorders will be discussed and understood as deviations 
from normal development in childhood and adolescence. 

Prerequisite: PSY 275. Fall only 

381 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

Topics may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with preregistration 
information and course hours. 

(On demand) 

425 Seminar on Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood 3 credits 

This seminar explores development during adolescence and emerging adulthood, and 
focuses on describing and explaining both normative development and individual 
differences. Students will analyze contemporary theories and current research on salient 
issues in adolescence and emerging adulthood, such as puberty, neurological and 
cognitive development, identity, dating and sexuality, family and peer relationships, 
school and work, and racial, ethnic, and cultural influences. We will also consider 
adolescent problems such as delinquency, drug and alcohol use, depression, and eating 
disorders. 

Prerequisite: Psy 275. Fall even years 



206 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



435 Controversies in Psychology 3 credits 

This course focuses on debates and conflicts over the past 30 years related to 
psychological concepts and theories of human behavior and experiences. The 
controversies discussed cross all subfields of psychology including clinical, social, 
developmental, biological, and cognitive. Topics may include multiple personality 
disorder, expert testimony, new age therapies, repressed memories, sexual orientation 
conversion therapies, inkblot tests, media violence, effect of spanking and divorce on 
children, and paranormal phenomenon. Students will learn in-depth methodologies for 
critical thinking and apply learned strategies to real-world problems. The course 
emphasizes the application of research skills to examine the multiple facets of each 
controversy in light of evidence gathered from current empirical sources. Students will 
take sides on an issue of their choice, gather evidence to support their position, and 
present their case in a symposium-style debate. 

Prerequisite: Psy 123. Spring odd years 

450 Personality 3 credits 

Survey of various theories of development, structure and characteristics of personality. 
Freudian theory, behavioral, humanistic and existential viewpoints, trait theorists and 
others are explored. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123, junior status or permission of instructor. Fall only 

452 Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 credits 

Emphasis is on treatment of psychopathology, including discussion of salient issues in 
therapy, attributes of successful therapists, ethical issues in therapy, and multicultural 
counseling. In addition, an emphasis will be placed on learning about major established 
therapies including, Psychoanalysis, Adlerian Therapy, Existential Therapy, Person- 
Centered Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, Reality Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Cognitive- 
Behavioral Therapy, Feminist Therapy, and Family Systems Therapy. We also study the 
current research on the effectiveness of the various therapies. 

Prerequisite: PSY 290. Spring odd years 

455 Child Interventions 3 credits 

The child interventions course focuses on assessment methods and interventions to 
treat child and adolescent disorders. Students will learn and practice how to conduct a 
comprehensive clinical interview to diagnose child and adolescent disorders and to 
become familiar with therapeutic issues such as ethnical and legal responsibilities and 
how to build a therapeutic relationship. Several models of child therapy will be discussed 
including family therapy and parent training, dialectical behavior therapy, group and 
psychopharmacological approaches. The course emphasizes the application of research 
in clinical practice and places assessment and treatment in a multicultural context. 
Assignments focus on critical thinking about childhood problems and their treatments 
and the practical application of assessment and treatment techniques through role-plays, 
practice sessions, and experiential assignments. 

Prerequisites: PSY 290 OR PSY 332. Spring even years 

470 Advanced Seminar in Psychology 3 credits 

A capstone experience intendecKto integrate earlier learning and to discuss post 
graduation issues. 

Prerequisite: Completed junior year as a psychology major. Spring only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 207 



475 Practicum in Psychology 3 credits 

Work experience in a setting where psychology is applied. Can be used to further career 
exploration or promote transition to the work place. 

Prerequisite: Completed junior year as a psychology major. Fall and Spring 

490 Independent Research 3 credits 

Opportunity for students to conduct a study on a topic of their choosing. 

Prerequisites: Overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, completion of PSY 233, and junior year 
status as a Psychology major. 
Fall and Spring 



Social Work Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences CSWE Program 

Degree BSW Accreditation 1975 

Department Chair Dennis Fisher, MSW Current Accredited Status 2004-2012 

Faculty 

James Calderone, Professor of Social Work, AB Wilkes University; MSSW University of 
Wisconsin-Madison; EdD Temple University 

Dennis Fisher, Associate Professor of Social Work, BS, MEd Bloomsburg University; MSW 
Marywood University 

Patricia J. Lewis, Associate Professor of Social Work, BS Wilkes University; MSW Marywood 
University; DSW Hunter College, City University of New York 

Deborah Mills, Visiting Assistant Professor of Social Work; BSW College Misericordia; MSW 
Temple University 

James Siberski, Assistant Professor, BA Wilkes University; MS College Misericordia 

Mission 

The mission of the social work program is to prepare students for entry-level generalist social 
work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. Inherent 
within this mission is a commitment to the development of BSW graduates who are dedicated 
to improving social, economic, and environmental conditions among diverse populations; and 
to promoting the Sisters of Mercy values of mercy, service, justice, and hospitality. 

Curriculum Policy Statement 

The social work program curriculum is organized around the primary goal of preparing 
competent baccalaureate-level generalist practitioners. It evolved institutionally from the 
Sisters of Mercy's own call to compassionate service through the ministries of teaching and 
healing and developed according to those mandates for curhcular content established by the 
Council on Social Work Education. These mandates include a liberal arts perspective, which is 
also the base for all professional programs in the university, and a professional foundation 
composed of required social work courses and field practicums designed to provide an 
integrated learning experience. This experience intends to educate students in the critical 
areas of social work values and ethics, diversity, social and economic justice, at-risk 
populations, human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policies and services, 
social work practice, and research. 



208 Bachelor's Degree Programs 






Program Goals 

The goals of the social work program are: 

1 . To educate and promote the development of problem-oriented, undergraduate 
generalist social work practitioners whose knowledge and skills base enables them to 
assess and address problematic situations among diverse individuals, families, 
groups, communities and organizations. 

2. To foster students' ability to integrate the institutional and professional ideals of social 
justice and intervene on behalf of those discriminated against and oppressed. 

3. To prepare students for graduate studies and foster commitment to a process of 
continued professional growth and development. 

Program Objectives 

Graduates of the BSW program will have sufficient knowledge and skills to: 

1 . Apply critical thinking skills in their professional practice. 

2. Practice within the values and ethics of the social work profession as reflected in the 
NASW Code of Ethics and the historical legacy of social work. 

3. Demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to the positive value of human 
diversity and a knowledge of special populations at-risk of, and/or victims of, 
discrimination and oppression. 

4. Advance social and economic justice through advocacy and social change strategies 
designed to benefit those populations denied opportunities due to historical, 
institutional, and social mechanisms of oppression and discrimination. 

5. Demonstrate understanding of the history of the social work profession and its impact 
on current practice and issues. 

6. Apply generalist practice knowledge and skills with individuals, families, groups, 
organizations and communities. 

7. Use evidence-based theoretical frameworks to understand interactions among 
individuals and between individuals and other social systems, and to recognize the 
biological, psychological and social factors that influence human behavior and 
development throughout the life cycle. 

8. Analyze and assess the impact of social policy on client systems and service 
providers, and suggest ways that policy can be influenced. 

9. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate research studies, to utilize research findings to 
effect practice, and to evaluate their own practice interventions. 

10. Use communication skills differentially with client populations, colleagues, and 
members of the community. 

1 1 . Use supervision, consultation and other professional development opportunities to 
enhance practice knowledge and skills. 

12. Assess the organizations context of a social service agency, function within the 
parameters of this context, and advocate for necessary change. 

13. Demonstrate the use of professional self including the ability to write clearly, 
understand verbal and nonverbal communication, accept constructive criticism of 
performance, and employ various mechanisms to develop self-awareness. 

14. Assess and describe the community context of social work practice. 

15. Demonstrate understanding of the professional context of social work practice. 

16. Utilize a global perspective in understanding the commonality of human needs and the 
different ways in which these needs are addressed. 

17. Demonstrate proficiency in computer applications required for adequate service 
delivery in agency settings. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 209 



Field Instruction 

Field instruction is the principle means through which students demonstrate application of 
knowledge and skills. Offered in a variety of settings in both the public and private sectors, 
field instruction presents students with a structured educational experience that enables them 
to integrate classroom information, learn about the structure and operation of social work 
agencies, and experience actual practice situations. Students receive a minimum of 600 hours 
of supervised field experience through assignments in both their junior and senior years. 

Social work field instruction is limited to social work majors who have successfully completed a 
specific sequence of courses and have been formally admitted into the social work program. 
Transportation to and from field placement is the student's responsibility. 

Admission 

Although students who meet university admission criteria will be admitted into the social work 
major as first year students for the purpose of academic advising and support, formal program 
admission does not occur until the end of the second semester of the sophomore year. The 
following criteria will be used in determining formal admission: 

1 . Personal interview with a member of the full-time social work faculty; 

2. Completion of a minimum of 45 credit hours, including all first year and sophomore 
social work core courses listed in the university catalog; 

3. Attainment of a minimum grade of 2. 00 in SWK 251 Introduction to Social Welfare; 
SWK 252 Social Welfare Policies and Services, and SWK 285 Communication Skills. 
In addition, students must have successfully completed SWK 200 Building Multicultural 
Competence and earned a minimum GPA of 2.50 in SOC 103 Community Services. 

4. Attainment of an overall G.P.A. of 2.50 and a minimum of 2.50 in social work core 
courses; 

5. Acceptance of and sensitivity toward diversities among people; 

6. Emotional and mental maturity and stability for effective social work practice; 

7. Values, ethics, and behaviors consistent with those of social work; 

8. A personal statement and narrative response. 

Any student not fulfilling the criteria above will be duly notified by the department chair of 
program probation or dismissal. Students placed on probation will be allowed one semester for 
grade replacements and/or other corrective actions. Students dismissed from the program will 
not be readmitted. Specific procedures for admissions can be found in the student handbook 
and field instruction manual. Excerpts of these policies and procedures can also be requested 
from the admission's office. 

Retention 

Continuation in the major requires that students maintain a 2.50 GPA in the social work core 
and a minimum overall GPA of 2.50. 

Transfer Students 

Both internal and external transfer students must first interview with the department chair or 
designee prior to formal admission into the major. The program and its policies will be 
discussed and an evaluation will be made of transfer credits. Two recommendations from 
individuals capable of assessing the student's character and potential for the BSW degree are 
required. Formal program admission occurs after successful completion of one full semester in 
the major and prior to enrollment in SWK 371 Field Instruction I. Transfer students must also 
meet all standards expected of incoming first-year students. 



270 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Curriculum Options 

Considerable flexibility within the major exists to allow students to elect minors in such areas 
as child welfare services, gerontology, addictions counseling, and psychology. 

The social work program is entering its third decade of accreditation by the Council on Social 
Work Education. Graduates may be eligible for advanced standing in numerous graduate 
schools of social work throughout the country. 

Social Work BSW Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


BIO 103 


General Biology I* 


3 


BIO 104 


General Biology II 3 


PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology* 


3 


SOC 122 


Social Problems* 3 


SOC101 


Comparative Sociology* 


3 


POL 100 


American National 3 


HIS 


History Core 


3 




Government* 


BUS 105 


Basic Computer 


3 


HIS 


History Core 3 




Technology 




MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 3 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester Total Credits 16 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 



SOC 103 


Community Service* 


3 


MTH 115 


Statistics* 3 


SOC 221 


Cultural Minorities* 


3 


SOC 321 


The Family* 3 


SWK 200 


Build. Multi-Cult. 
Competencies* 


1 


SWK 252 


Social Welfare Policies, 3 
Service* 


SWK 251 


Introduction to Social 
Welfare* 


3 


PHL 
101C 


Introduction to Philosophy 3 


SWK 285 


Communication Skills* 


3 


SWK 360 


Special Topics* 1 


Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


ENG 


English Core 


3 


ENG 


English Core 3 


GER241 


Intro, to Social 


3 


RLS 


Religion Core 3 




Gerontology* 




SWK 352 


Adaptive Behavior* 3 


SWK 232 


Research Methods* 


3 


SWK 354 


SWK Methods and 3 


SWK 353 


SWK Methods and 


3 




Processes II* 




Processes I* 




SWK/ADC 


Substance Abuse 3 


SWK 371 


Field Instruction I* 


3 




elective* 


SWK 472 


Field Instruction Seminar I* 


1 


SWK 360 


Special Topics* 1 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 211 



Senior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


PSY 290 


Psychopathology* 


3 


RLS 


Religion Core 3 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 


3 




Free Elective 3 


SWK 


Free Elective* 


3 




Free Elective 3 




Free Elective 


3 


SWK 


SWK Free Elective* 3 


SWK 475 


Field Instruction II* 


3 


SWK 476 


Field Instruction III* 3 


SWK 473 


Field Instruction Seminar 


1 




or 




II* 




SWK 477 


Field Instruction IV* (6) 




or 






(Block) 


SWK 477 


Field Instruction IV *(Block) 




SWK 474 


Field Instruction 1 
Seminar III* 








Total required for graduation 126 credits 



* Required Social Work Core Course 

Social Work Course Descriptions (SWK) 

200 Building Multicultural Competence 1 credit 

Two-day workshop course intended to provide students with the opportunity to assess 
their level of cultural competence and develop skills for working with diverse populations. 

222 Drug Pharmacology 3 credits 

A comprehensive understanding of drug pharmacology and its effect on the user. The 
course will include examination of such topics as classifications of drugs, synergistic 
effects of drugs on the body, drug tolerance and dependence, and the over-the-counter 
pharmaceutical industry. 
Fall 

232 Research Methods 3 credits 

Quantitative and qualitative research methodology, and appreciation of the scientific 
method as applied to the behavioral sciences and social work. The language of science, 
concepts, propositions, models, hypotheses and empirical laws. Analysis of concepts of 
the experimental, correlational and case study methods. Critical reading of research; 
introduction to research activities; and evaluation of interventive efforts. 

Prerequisite: MTH 115 or permission of instructor. Fall 

251 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 credits 
Introduction to the field of social work and the social welfare system in the United States. 
Focuses on the historical and philosophical antecedents of present day social welfare 
programs and the development of social work as a profession. 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor. Fall 

252 Social Welfare Policies and Services 3 credits 
A systems approach to the study and assessment of contemporary social welfare 
programs. Focuses on the interplay of social, political and economic forces that influence 
the planning and implementation of social welfare services. 

Prerequisite: SWK 251 or permission of instructor. Spring 



21 2 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



285 Communication Skills 3 credits 

Development of skills for helping professionals in direct work with individual clients, 
groups, and others. Listening for emotions, monitoring one's own reactions and 
responses, building group leadership skills, and developing relationships that foster 
constructive change. 

Prerequisites: PSY 123, SOC 101. Fall/Spring 

333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 credits 

A study of the special problems of the adolescent substance abuser. Correlates that add 
impetus to the progression of the problem will be examined. Emphasis will be on early 
identification and detection as key components in initiating intervention strategies. 

Fall 

335 Substance Abuse in Special Populations 3 credits 

A multi-faceted look at the myriad of special populations affected by substance abuse. 
Emphasis will be on cross-cultural influences and the role they play in contributing to 
substance abuse. 

Prerequisite: ADC 340 or permission of instructor. Spring 

337 Substance Abuse Treatment Methods 3 credits 

An examination and critique of the many treatment resources and methods that have 
been developed during the last 20 years. Discussion will include but not be limited to 
such treatment methods as psychotherapy with individuals and groups, drug therapy, 
family and network therapy, detoxification, and behavioral therapy. 

Prerequisite: ADC 340 or permission of instructor. Spring 

339 Substance Abuse and Criminality 3 credits 
yAn examination of the correlation between substance abuse and criminality. This 
course will analyze the theoretical models of the substance abuse/crime relationship and 
its societal implications. Topics to be explored will include drugs and street crime, DUI, 
Interdiction, strategies, urinalysis testing, and substance abuse and family violence. 

Fall 

340 Alcoholism 3 credits 
An introduction to the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholism. Emphasis is placed on 
contemporary beliefs and attitudes toward alcohol, effects on the family, and implications 
for treatment. 

341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 
Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis and treatment methods specific to the aged 
substance abuser. Issues examined will include misuse and abuse of prescription drugs, 
behavior and risk factors, factors relaTed to underdiagnosis and relationship to 
depression and suicide. 

Alternate years: WEC 

352 Adaptive Behavior 3 credits 

A life cycle course exploring the bio-psycho-social-cultural determinants of human 
behavior from a ecological/systems perspective. Emphasis is placed on the adaptive 
capacity of humans in interaction with their physical and social environments. 

Prerequisites: PSY 123, SOC 101, social work majors only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 213 



353/4 Social Work Methods and Processes I and II 3 credits 

Skills in social work assessment and intervention with micro-mezzo-macro systems. The 
generalist perspective and theoretical underpinnings of systems intervention will be 
developed and applied in the context of generalist social work practice. 

Prerequisites: For SWK 353-SWK 251, SWK 285; For SWK 354-SWK 252, SWK 
353, social work majors only 

355 Sexuality in Childhood and Adolescence 3 credits 
Overview of the emerging sexual self from early childhood through adolescence. 
Examination of one's own sexual values and their relationship to acceptance of 
diversified sexual behaviors and lifestyles. 

356 Developing Cultural Competence with Children and Families 3 credits 
Examination of issues involved in working with children and families from diverse 
cultural, ethnic, and language groups. Emphasis on awareness and understanding of 
one's own cultural background, values, and beliefs, and their implications for developing 
intercultural effectiveness while working with others. 

358 Counseling the Older Adult 1-3 credits 

A social worker practice course with emphasis on individual and group counseling 
techniques for older persons with emotional and social difficulties. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Alternate years 

360 Special Topics in Social Work Practice 1-3 credits 

361 Special Topics in Social Work Policy 1-3 credits 
Content of these courses varies from semester to semester in keeping with student and 
faculty interest. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (On demand) 

363 Child Welfare Services 3 credits 

The history and current provision of services to children in need of care because of 
neglect, abuse, or lack of family support. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall 

371 Field Instruction I 3 credits 
Students work in a community agency two days per week (200 hours) for one semester, 
under the supervision of an agency person and a member of the social work faculty. 
Students participate fully in agency activities. 

Prerequisites: SOC 103, SWK 251, SWK 285, SWK 353; Social Work majors only 

372 Field Instruction Seminar 1 credit 
Weekly seminar for students involved in field instruction; for duration of field placement. 
Integration of theoretical knowledge with practical field experiences. Student case 
materials and experiences discussed. 

Social work majors only 



214 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



375 Aging Policies and Programs 3 credits 

Analysis of causes, intent, and results of policy decisions as they are experienced as 
programs and services for the elderly. Discussion of policies affecting income, health 
care, social services, and volunteerism. 

Prerequisite: GER 241. Spring 

390/391 Seminar 3 credits 

Analysis of special areas of social work 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (On demand) 

392 Child Abuse and Neglect 3 credits 
A practice-oriented course for students who intend to work in a protective service role. 
Topics include abuse and neglect: causes, legal sanctions for intervention, treatment 
approaches, case planning, and services. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Fall 

393 Child Welfare Law 3 credits 
Examination of the laws that child welfare workers rely on to promote the rights of 
families and children. Topics include state and local laws that provide services to families 
and children, legal resources for offenders, child welfare service provision in specific 
areas, e.g., adoption. 

Prerequisite: CWS 363 or permission of instructor. Spring 

395 Foster, Residential and Adoptive Care 3 credits 

Assessment, case planning, and the provision of services in foster care, in residential 
facilities and for child adoption. 

Prerequisite: SWK 363 or permission of instructor. Alternate years 

473/474Field Instruction Seminar 2 credits 

Weekly seminar for students involved in field instruction; for duration of field placement. 
Integration of theoretical knowledge with practical field experiences. Student case 
materials and experiences discussed. 

Corequisite: Field instruction course; social work majors only 

475/476Field Instruction l-ll 3 credits 

Two days a week (400 hours) for two semesters, senior social work students practice in 
a social service agency; practice supervised by agency representative; education 
directed by social work facility. Direct service to clients. 

Prerequisite: Permission of field coordinator; social work majors only 

All Field Instruction IV 3 credits 

An alternative to SWK 476 in cases where block placements are more valuable. Senior 
social work students work full-time in an agency for 12 to 14 weeks (400 hours) for one 
semester. Practice supervised by an agency representative; education directed by social 
work faculty member. Direct service to clients. 

Prerequisite: Permission of field coordinator; social work majors only 

480 Independent Study 3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. (On demand) 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 21 5 



Speech-language Pathology Major 

College of Health Sciences 

Degree MS, Speech-language Pathology 

Department Chair Glen Tellis, PhD 

Faculty 

Lori Cimino, Clinical Director, BS Man/wood University, Pennsylvania; MS Bloomsburg University, 
Pennsylvania 

Mckinley Hunter Manasco, Assistant Professor, MS University of Montevallo, Montevallo, 
Alabama; PhD, University of South Alabama, Alabama 

Glen Tellis, Associate Professor, MA California State University, Fresno; PhD The Pennsylvania 
State University 

Can Tellis, Assistant Professor, BA The Pennsylvania State University; MS University of 
Pittsburgh; PhD, University of Pittsburgh 

Ruixia Yan, Assistant Professor, BA and MA Shanxi University, China; Ph.D. University of 
Louisiana at Lafayette 

Introduction 

The speech-language pathology program is a five-year, professional master's degree program 
with admission in the first year. Students admitted as first year or undergraduate transfers who 
successfully complete all major and university requirements are awarded a BS degree in 
health sciences in addition to an MS degree in speech-language pathology. Students who 
have baccalaureate degrees — whether in communication disorders or another field — are 
conferred the MS degree in speech-language pathology upon completion of all requirements 
but do not receive the BS in health science. 

For traditional five year and transfer students, the program's first two years of study provide a 
strong foundation in the liberal arts and sciences appropriate breadth to develop the ability in 
students to think independently, weigh values, and understand fundamental theory. This 
further serves to develop skills of critical thinking and communication, inherent in 
baccalaureate education and essential to professional socialization. The speech-language 
pathology professional curriculum is initiated in the first year and continues through the fifth 
year. 

The program is guided by the accreditation and certification standards put forth by the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) as the accrediting agency for entry- 
level speech-language pathology programs. Graduates of programs accredited by ASHA are 
eligible to apply for national certification by ASHA and for state licensure as speech-language 
pathologists in the individual United States and territories in which licensure is mandated. The 
master's program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia University is accredited by the 
Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association. 

Mission 

The speech-language pathology program is committed to providing an educational experience 
which produces competent speech-language pathologists who are critical thinkers and 
educated consumers of research, and which prepares its graduates for productive careers in 
speech-language pathology and as advocates for, and participants in, life-long learning. As an 
entry-level professional program, the speech-language pathology curriculum reflects a 
commitment to the complementary relationship between liberal arts and professional studies 
that enables graduates to adapt to constantly evolving societal and professional needs. The 
department of speech-language pathology is committed to the provision of affordable, quality 
professional education that expresses the founding Sisters' values and attitudes of hospitality, 



216 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



justice, mercy, and service. The overall goal is to develop a well-rounded empathetic 
competent professional who will provide the highest quality of care to individuals with 
communication disorders. 

Philosophy 

The speech-language pathology department is based on the belief that graduates of entry- 
level allied health professional programs should possess the clinical decision making and 
problem solving skills which enable them to function as peer colleagues in the contemporary, 
dynamic health care and educational systems. Speech-language pathologists need to be 
sensitive to the needs of a culturally diverse society as evident in their interactions with clients, 
families, and fellow health care and education professionals in the community in which they 
practice. 

An educational program for speech-language pathologists should reflect the concepts of 
androgogy (adult education) to include problem solving, critical thinking and analysis, 
integration of theory and practice, clinical decision making, mentoring, and self-directed 
learning. 

Speech-language pathologists should have the ability to articulate and exchange knowledge, 
and seek additional knowledge and skills. They should also have the ability and desire to 
remain open to input from and collaboration with other health care and education 
professionals. Speech-language pathologists value collaboration and communication in a spirit 
of mutual collegiality among health care and education providers as essential to meeting the 
health care needs of society. 

A speech-language pathology professional education program prepares students to be 
practicing generalists but also provides graduates with the tools that enable them to develop 
specialty expertise through the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills and a 
wholistic approach to health care. 

The academic and clinical faculty and the academic and clinical education environments must 
reflect and foster professional values and behaviors. The academic and clinical faculty and 
curriculum components must be inextricably linked for the provision of professional education 
programs preparing competent health care practitioners. 

A diverse faculty whose members have responsibilities and activities consistent with their 
areas of teaching and scholarly expertise strengthens and enhances a professional education 
program in speech-language pathology. 

Goals 

The goals of the speech-language pathology department at Misericordia University are to 
prepare graduates who: 

1. Engage in contemporary, competent, legal, and ethical practice. 

2. Value the critical inquiry in the validation and advancement of the science of speech- 
language pathology and audiology. 

3. Describe the roles and responsibilities of speech-language pathologists as 
professionally autonomous practitioners within the health care and educational 
systems. 

4. Accept the responsibility for education of self, the community, the profession, clients, 
and colleagues in the health care and educational systems. 

5. Value and foster communication and interaction with colleagues for the benefit of 
optimal service to clients with communication disorders. 

6. Respect and respond to contemporary bio-psycho-social diversity in interactions with 
clients, families, colleagues, and the community. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 217 



It is the mission of the speech-language pathology program to educate and prepare students 
who will be ethical and competent clinicians in the provision of services to persons with 
speech-language-hearing disorders. 

Program Objectives 

To ensure that graduates of the speech-language pathology program will be prepared for their 
professional roles and responsibilities, the following are the program's curriculum objectives. 
Upon successful completion of the speech-language pathology program, graduates will be 
able to: 

1. Provide prevention, screening, consultation, assessment and diagnosis, treatment, 
intervetion, management, counseling, and follow-up services for disorders of: 

a. speech (i.e., articulation, fluency, resonance, and voice including aeromechanical 
components of respiration). 

b. language (i.e., phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatic/social 
aspects of communication) including comprehension and expression in oral, 
written, graphic, and manual modalities; language processing; preliteracy and 
language-based literacy skills, including phonological awareness. 

c. swallowing or other upper aerodigestive functions such as infant feeding and 
aeromechanical events (evaluation of esophageal function is for the purpose of 
referral to medical professionals). 

d. cognitive aspects of communication (e.g., attention, memory, problem solving, 
executive functions). 

e. sensory awareness related to communication, swallowing, or other upper 
aerodigestive functions. 

2. Establish augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques and 
strategies including developing, selecting, and prescribing of such systems and 
devices (e.g., speech generating devices). 

3. Provide services to individuals with hearing loss and their families/caregivers (e.g., 
auditory training; speech reading; speech and language intervention secondary to 
hearing loss). 

4. Screen hearing of individuals who can participate in conventional pure-tone air 
conduction methods, as well as screening for middle ear pathology through screening 
tympanometry for the purpose of referral of individuals for further evaluation and 
management. 

5. Use instrumentation (e.g., videofluoroscopy, EMG, nasendoscopy, stroboscopy, 
computer technology) to observe, collect data, and measure parameters of 
communication and swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions in accordance 
with the principles of evidence-based practice. 

6. Select, fit, and establish effective use of prosthetic/adaptive devices for 
communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions (e.g., 
tracheoesophageal prostheses, speaking valves, electrolarynges). This does not 
include sensory devices used by individuals with hearing loss or other auditory 
perceptual deficits. 

7. Collaborate in the assessment of central auditory processing disorders and providing 
intervention where there is evidence of speech, language, and/or other cognitive- 
communication disorders. 

8. Educate and counsel individuals, families, co-workers, educators, and other persons in 
the community regarding acceptance, adaptation, and decision making about 
communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive concerns. 



218 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



9. Advocate for individuals through community awareness, education, and training 
programs to promote and facilitate access to full participation in communication, 
including the elimination of societal barriers. 

10. Collaborate with and provide referrals and information to audiologists, educators, and 
other health professionals as individual needs dictate. 

1 1 . Address behaviors (e.g., perseverative or disruptive actions) and environments (e.g., 
seating, positioning for swallowing safety or attention, communication opportunities) 
that affect communication, swallowing, or other upper aerodigestive functions. 

12. Provide services to modify or enhance communication performance (e.g., accent 
modification, transgendered voice, care and improvement of the professional voice, 
personal/professional communication effectiveness). 

13. Recognize the need to provide and appropriately accommodate diagnostic and 
treatment services to individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds and adjust 
treatment and assessment services accordingly. 

14. Be critical consumers of professional literature. 

1 5. Accept responsibility for service to one's fellow human beings. 

The academic curriculum, practicum experiences, research requirement, and service activity 
requirements that students must complete in this program have been designed and will be 
implemented in a way that will ensure that graduates meet or exceed these objectives. The net 
result of the student's educational experience in this program will be a well-prepared, service- 
oriented, competent professional who is fully prepared and eligible for ASHA certification as a 
speech-language pathologist. 

Undergraduate Program in Speech-language Pathology 

Students may enter the undergraduate speech-language pathology program in one of two 
ways: (1) as traditional five-year students who have graduated from high school but have not 
yet entered college, or (2) as students who have entered college and have taken speech- 
language pathology courses at other colleges or universities and wish to transfer, or have 
either chosen a different major or have not selected a major but wish to transfer into the 
speech-language pathology program. 

Admission of Traditional Five-Year Students 

Students must have graduated from high school but have not yet entered college. For these 
students, the speech-language pathology curriculum is a 5 year professional program leading 
simultaneously to the baccalaureate and master's degrees. Prospective undergraduate 
applicants must meet both Misericordia University's and the speech-language pathology 
department's admissions criteria. For more information, please see applying to the speech- 
language pathology program section of this catalog. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

Students may seek admission into the program as a transfer, either from another department 
at Misericordia University or another institution of higher learning. Applications for admission 
of transfer students wiil be considered on a competitive, space-available basis. All students 
accepted into the program as undergraduate transfers must meet Misericordia University's 
requirements for a baccalaureate degree by taking the necessary coursework to ensure 
compliance with the requirements. 

Advancement to the Undergraduate Speech-language Pathology Program 

For both traditional five-year students and transfer students, advancement to the 
undergraduate program (traditionally the junior year) is continuous. Students who are admitted 
to the program take Speech-language Pathology undergraduate courses in their freshmen, 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 219 



sophomore, and junior years. Students need to maintain a 3.0 GPA throughout the 
undergraduate program. 

Advancement to Graduate Study in Speech-language Pathology 

To advance to the graduate portion of the speech-language pathology program (typically the 
senior and fifth years of study), students must: 

1 . Maintain an overall cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. 

2. Receive a grade of "C-" or better in the undergraduate speech-language pathology 
courses. 

3. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses 
taken prior to the senior year (first year graduate school). 

Advancement within the Graduate Portion of the Speech-language Pathology Program 

To advance from the first year (traditionally the senior year) to the second year (traditionally the 
fifth year) of study, students must 

1 . Maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in all coursework and a minimum 
cumulative GPA of 3.0 in the graduate professional courses. 

2. Receive a grade of "B-" or better in all graduate level professional courses (courses at 
the 500 and 600 levels). Any student who receives a C+ or lower in any graduate level 
course (excluding clinic) has one opportunity to retake that course and receive a B- or 
better. Failure to achieve a grade of B- or better in any graduate level professional 
course wiil result in dismissal from the program. Students must receive a B or better in 
all graduate level clinical courses (500 and 600 level courses). Any student who 
receives a B- or lower in any graduate level clinical course has one opportunity to 
retake that clinic and receive a B or better. Failure to achieve a grade of B or better in 
clinical courses will result in dismissal from the program. 

3. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses 
taken during the senior year (first year graduate school) and 5th year. 

Applying to the Speech-language Pathology Program 

A potential applicant can enter the program in speech-language pathology under one of five 
circumstances, they are as follows: 

1 . a traditional student who has been accepted into the 5-year professional program; 

2. an undergraduate transfer who has not been conferred a baccalaureate degree; 

3. a graduate holding the baccalaureate degree with communication sciences and 
disorders; 

4. a graduate holding the baccalaureate degree in a major other than communication 
sciences and disorders-post-baccalaureate non-major; or 

5. an individual working in the field with a baccalaureate degree who desires to work 
toward the master's degree on a part-time basis-part-time student 

Traditional Students 

These students have graduated from high school but have not yet entered college. For these 
students, the speech-language pathology curriculum is a 5-year professional program leading 
simultaneously to the baccalaureate and master's degrees. 



220 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Undergraduate Admission Requirements 

Prospective undergraduate applicants must meet both Misericordia University's and the 
speech-language pathology department's admission criteria. 

Misericordia University's general criteria for acceptance into an undergraduate program are: 

1 . Evidence of the completion of 16 Carnegie Units, or evidence of a high school 
equivalency diploma. 

2. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing 
(ACT) program. 

3. A letter of recommendation from the high school principal, a guidance counselor, or a 
teacher. 

The speech-language pathology department includes additional admissions criteria. 
Traditional students entering the 5-year professional program must have the following criteria 
to be considered for acceptance into the speech-language pathology department: 

1 . Preference will be given to students who have graduated in the top 1/3 of their high 
school graduating class or achieved a minimum combined SAT score of 1000 or the 
equivalent ACT score with a minimum 3.0 GPA. 

2. The student must provide an essay of no more than 500 words indicating why the 
student wishes to pursue a career in speech-language pathology. 

Evidence of exposure through volunteerism or service-learning related to working with children 
and adults is highly desirable. 

Graduate Admission Requirements 

Graduate study begins in the fourth (traditionally the senior) year and continues through to the 
fifth year of study. For traditional students to advance to graduate study, certain prerequisite 
criteria must be met: 

1 . Maintain an overall cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. 

2. Receive a grade of "C-" or better in the undergraduate speech-language pathology 
courses. 

3. Successfully master all course objectives for all speech-language pathology courses 
taken prior to the senior year (first year graduate school). 

a. Students begin their speech-language pathology courses in their freshman year 
and will typically complete all undergraduate coursework by their junior year. Upon 
completion of each semester, the progress of each student in terms of which 
course objectives were and were not mastered during that semester will be 
reviewed. 

b. For any course objectives not mastered, the student will be given an assignment to 
assist them in mastering those objectives. Students cannot take graduate level 
coursework if they have not mastered all objectives. 

Once criteria (1) through (3) above are successfully met, the candidate is automatically 
granted permission to commence to graduate study (i.e., there is no need for the student to 
make a formal application to graduate school). 

Undergraduate Transfer Students 

These students are individuals who have completed college-level courses either at 
Misericordia University or another institution of higher education, and who have a major other 
than speech-language pathology, but would like to major in speech-language pathology 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 22 1 



Undergraduate Admission Requirements 

Students who transfer into the program, either from another academic unit within the university 
or from another institution of higher education, also will be required to meet the department's 
admission criteria. Students will be required to meet Misericordia University's requirements for 
a baccalaureate degree by taking the necessary coursework to ensure compliance with the 
requirements. Please refer to undergraduate admission requirements for traditional students. 
A recommendation letter from a current professor may be substituted for a letter from a 
principal, guidance counselor, or teacher. 

Graduate Admission Requirements 

Please refer to graduate admission requirements for traditional students. 



Post-Baccalaureate Majors 



These students have earned a baccalaureate degree in communication sciences and 
disorders or speech-language pathology and are eligible for direct entry into the graduate 
program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia University. 

Graduate Admission Requirements 

Students who apply to the graduate program in speech-language pathology and possess a 
baccalaureate degree in communication sciences and disorders must meet the following 
departmental admissions criteria: 

1 . A cumulative grade point average of at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

2. GRE scores. In certain circumstances, however, the GRE requirement may be waived 
after consultation with the admission office. 

3. Original academic transcripts. 

4. Two letters of recommendation from professors or instructors in speech-language 
pathology. 

5. A type-written essay of no more than two double-spaced pages indicating why the 
student wishes to pursue a career in speech-language pathology. 

6. In addition to meeting the admissions requirement above, applicants for whom English 
is not their primary language must provide evidence of proficiency in the language. 
Evidence of English proficiency should be presented in the form of a minimum score of 
550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

These individuals are admitted directly into the graduate speech-language pathology program. 
Students must provide evidence of meeting certain knowledge and skills outcomes obtained 
during their undergraduate studies. The knowledge and skills outcomes should be 
documented on the Knowledge and Skills Acquisition (KASA) form used by ASHA for 
certification purposes. Any student who cannot provide evidence of acquiring certain 
knowledge and skills outcomes will be required to reconstruct their undergraduate experience 
so that the KASA form can be completed accurately. 

If you are a student about to earn a baccalaureate degree in communication disorders or 
speech-language pathology, you should contact the chair of your department to inquire about 
documenting your undergraduate studies using the KASA form from ASHA. 

As of January 1 , 2005, new ASHA certification standards have taken effect. These standards 
may require you to take additional coursework to meet the new standards. For example, 
candidates for certification will be required to show evidence of having completed courses in 
both the biological and physical sciences. If your undergraduate transcript does not show 
evidence of having taken a course in the physical sciences, for example, you would be 



222 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



required to take a course in the physical sciences to meet the new certification requirements. 
Any additional courses you may have to take to meet ASHA's certification standards can be 
worked into your schedule (e.g., many of the basic science courses are offered during the 
summer). 



Post-Baccalaureate Non-Majors 



These students have earned a baccalaureate degree in any discipline other than 
communication sciences and disorders (e.g., biology, communications, education, English, 
linguistics). 

Graduate Admission Requirements 

Students who apply to the graduate program in speech-language pathology and possess a 
baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than communication sciences and disorders or 
speech-language pathology must have the following admission requirements: 

1 . A cumulative grade point average of at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

2. GRE scores. In certain circumstances, however, the GRE requirement may be waived 
after consultation with the admissions office. 

3. Original academic transcripts. 

4. Two letters of recommendation. 

5. A type-written essay of no more than two double-spaced pages indicating why the 
student wishes to pursue a career in speech-language pathology. 

6. In addition to meeting the admissions requirement above, applicants for whom English 
is not their primary language must provide evidence of proficiency in the language. 
Evidence of English proficiency should be presented in the form of a minimum score of 
550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 

Before the candidate can begin graduate studies, he or she must successfully complete 
prerequisite undergraduate courses. These courses provide the individual with the appropriate 
framework and background in communication sciences and disorders so that he or she will be 
prepared to enter graduate study. To be granted entry into graduate study, the candidate must 
complete prerequisite under-graduate coursework with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00, 
and must have earned a grade of "C-" or better in each of the courses. For any course 
objectives not mastered, students will be given an assignment to assist them in mastering 
those objectives. Students cannot take graduate level coursework if they have not mastered all 
objectives. 

Part-Time Students 

These students have earned the baccalaureate degree in communication disorders or speech- 
language pathology and are working in the public schools. 

Graduate Admission Requirements 

Please refer to graduate admission requirements for post-baccalaureate majors. 

Teacher Certification 

Students who plan to work in the school system in Pennsylvania are required to obtain state 
teacher certification in speech and language disabilities. To be eligible for teacher certification, 
students must successfully complete the designated special education courses, SLP 300 - 
Speech-Language Pathology in the Schools class, the PRAXIS series exams (PRAXIS I and II 
tests; Teaching Speech to Students with Language Impairments test), a school fieldwork 
(supervised by a licensed speech-language pathologist who has the certificate of clinical 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 223 



competence), and other Pennsylvania Department of Education requirements (6 credits of 
Math; 6 credits of English - 3 American or British Literature and 3 English Composition; 3 
credits of lab science). Students need to obtain a C or better in all classes and maintain a 
minimum 3.0 GPA. Students from states other than Pennsylvania will need to check the 
requirements with their state education departments. These students will also need to 
determine whether their states have reciprocity agreements with Pennsylvania. 

Graduation 

To graduate with the master of science degree in speech-language pathology, students must 
meet the following criteria: 

1 . Complete all academic coursework. 

2. Complete all clinical practicum requirements. 

3. Pass a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis during the last year of 
graduate study. 

4. Show evidence of having taken the PRAXIS SLP 

Students meeting criteria (1) through (4) above will be eligible for graduation. Traditional 5- 
year students and undergraduate transfers who have completed both the undergraduate and 
graduate curricula at Misericordia University will be granted both the bachelor of science 
degree in health sciences and the master of science degree in speech-language pathology. 
Students who have completed the graduate curriculum only (i.e., students who earned a 
baccalaureate degree prior to commencing graduate studies in the speech-language 
pathology program) will be granted the master of science degree in speech-language 
pathology. 

Statement Concerning Program Accreditation 

The master's program in speech-language pathology is accreditated by the Council on 
Academic Accreditation (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. If 
students have additional questions about Misericordia University's ASHA accreditation status, 
they should contact the Accreditation Department at ASHA at (301)897-5700, X142. Students 
may also file grievances with ASHA's Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA). To learn 
about ASHA's grievance policy, students can go to the following link: www.asha.org 

Speech-language Pathology MS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 


PSY 123 


orSOC 101 


3 


SOC101 


or PSY 1231 3 


SCI 


Natural Science Core 


3 


SCI 


Natural Science Core 3 


HIS 


Core 


3 


ENG 


Core 3 


ENG 103 


Composition 


3 


ENG 


Amer or Brit Literature 3 


SLP 210 


Intro to Com Dis 


3 


Core 






Free elective 


3 


SLP 240 
HIS 


Norm SP & Lang Dev 3 
Core 3 



224 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Se 


i mester Total Credits 1 7 


FA 


Core 


3 


MTH 115 


Statistics 3 


MTH 


Bank I 


3 


RLS 


Core 3 


PHL 


Core 


3 


FA 


Core 3 


PSY 275 


Child & Adol Psych 


3 


SLP 250 


Speech & Hearing 3 


SLP 220 


A&P of Speech & Hr 


3 




Science 




Science 




SLP 330 


Intro to Audiology 3 


SLP 260 


Artic/Phon/Lang Dis 


3 


SLP 305 


OB & Clin Procedures I 3 


Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 


PHL 


or Natural Science 


3 


PHL 


or Natural Science 3 


Core 


Cognate 




Core 


Cognate 


SLP 300 


SLP in Schools 


2 


SLP 310/512 Research Methods 3 


SLP 410 


Aural Rehab 


3 


SLP 350 


Adult Comm Dis 3 


SLP 230 


Phonetics 


3 


SLP 450 


Optional Clinic 3 


SLP 325 


Stutt/Voice/Cleft Palate 


3 




TED 364 Meth in Spec. 3 


SLP 340 


Communication & Aging 


2 




Educ 


SLP 415 


OB & Clinical Procedures II 


2 




Free Elective 3 



Senior Year (Graduate I) 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7* 


Second Semester Total Credits 17 * 


SLP 500 


Artie & Phon Disorders 


3 


SLP 510 


Fluency Disorders 3 


SLP 530 


Voice Disorders 


3 


SLP 525 


Child Language Disorder 3 


SLP 575 


Motor Speech Disorders 


3 


SLP 545 


Aphasia & Cog Comm 3 


SLP 560 


Diag (3cr) with SLP 


4 




Dis 




555(1 cr) 




SLP 585 


SLP Seminar III 3 


SLP 505 


Clinic I (sec l-IV) 


3 


SLP 560 


Diag (3cr) with SLP 555 4 


SLP 565 


SLP Seminar I 


1 




(1cr) 


SLP 515 


Hearing Sem 


1 


SLP 605 


Clinic II (sec l-IV) 3 


RLS 


Core 


3 


SLP 566 


SLP Seminar II 1 




*18 with Diagnostics 




SLP 515 


Hearing Seminar 1 
* 18 with Diagnostics 



Summer Total Credits 6* 

SLP 589 Dysphagia ' 3 

SLP 560 Diag(3cr) with SLP 555 4 

(1cr) 
SLP 601 Sum Clin I (l-IV) 3 

Total Credits 6* 
SLP 540 AAC 3 

SLP 602 Summer Clinic II (l-IV) 3 

*10 with Diagnostics 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 225 



Graduate Year II 

First Semester Total Credits 12 Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

SLP610 Fieldworkll 9 SLP 620 Fieldwork II 9 

SLP 650 Professional Issues 3 SLP 680 Thesis Option 3 

* Students are only required to take SLP 560 
Diagnostics (3cr) with SLP 555 Diag Clin (1cr) once and SLP 515 Hearing Seminar once. 

Note 1: Students who decide to pursue teacher certification (to work as a school SLP in PA) 
will need all PDE courses and a lab science course 

Note 2: Students may need to take SLP 630 - a third field placement until they have satisfied 
the department's and ASHA's certificate requirements pertaining to clinical experiences. 
Note 3: For prerequisites, please refer to the catalog or advising sheet 

Speech-language Pathology Course Descriptions (SLP) 

210 Introduction to Communication Disorders 3 credits 

This course is designed to give the student an overview of the speech-language 
pathology profession by describing the types of disorders that are likely to be 
encountered in a typical caseload. Additionally, the student is given basic information 
about the profession: typical work settings, certification and licensure requirements, and 
the profession's Code of Ethics. 

Fall only 

220 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing 3 credits 

This course covers anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanism, 
including nomenclature, respiration, phonation, articulation/resonance, the nervous 
system, and the auditory system. A laboratory is included to assist the student in 
learning the anatomy, utilizing models, charts, videotapes, and cadavers. 

Fall only 

230 Phonetics 3 credits 

Principles of phonetics and their application to speech is covered in this course. 
Classification of speech sounds according to various systems including, but not limited 
to, manner and place, distinctive features, and phonological processes. Exercises in 
phonetic transcription utilizing the International Phonetic Alphabet will be provided. 

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 230). Fall only 

240 Normal Speech and Language Development 3 credits 

To understand what constitutes a delay or disorder of speech and/or language 
comprehension or production, the speech-language pathologist must understand the 
nature and sequence of normal speech and language development. This course is 
designed to address how humans typically develop speech and language abilities, both 
in terms of comprehension and production. 

Spring only 



226 Bachelor's Degree Programs 






250 Speech and Hearing Science 3 credits 

The study of speech and hearing physiology, acoustic phonetics, and speech perception 
is covered in this course. 

Spring only 

260 Articulation, Phonology, and Language Disorders 3 credits 

This course includes an exploration of the processes related to developmental 
articulation, phonology, and language disorders from birth through adolescence. 
Instruction in the principles underlying modification of these disorders is provided. 

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 230. Spring only 

300 SLP in the Schools 2 credits 

This course includes the establishment and maintenance of speech and hearing 
programs within various administrative organizations, particularly in public schools. 
Emphasis is placed on the individual educational plan (IEP) process including referral, 
assessment, evaluation, identification, and development of a meaningful IEP. 
Techniques of scheduling, record keeping, material and equipment selection, 
counseling, and behavior management are discussed. In addition, the development of 
coordinated professional and interdisciplinary procedures and issues of ethical practice 
and cultural diversity are addressed. 

Fall only 

305 Observation and Clinical Procedures I 2 credits 

This course includes clinical procedures for working in various practicum settings, using 
diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, writing behavioral objectives, procedures for 
report writing, and practical experience with clinician-made and commercial materials. 
This course also provides direct clinical observation of the evaluation and rehabilitation 
of individuals with speech, language, and hearing problems. A minimum of 20 clock 
hours of observation will be required. 

Spring only 

31 0/51 2 Methods and Critical Consumerism in Research 3 credits 

A study of research design and statistical analysis as it pertains to communication 
disorders is covered in this course. Topics will include levels of measurement, single and 
group research designs, nonparametric and parametric statistics, and the organization 
and implementation of research from formulation of research questions through 
dissemination of results. The seminar will involve the critical review of representative 
samples of research in the speech-language pathology literature. 

Spring only 

325 Stuttering, Voice, and Cleft Palate 3 credits 

An introduction to the developmental, psychogenic, and organic bases for stuttering, 
voice disorders, and cleft palate is covered in this course. Instruction in principles 
underlying treatment of these disorders with emphasis on anatomical deviations and 
laryngeal dysfunction is provided. 

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 220. Fall only 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 227 



330 Introduction to Audiology 3 credits 

This course provides an introduction to theories of hearing. Students will be exposed to 
basic audiometric principles used in hearing measurement. Auditory tests include pure 
tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and electrophysiological measures used to assess 
hearing sensitivity in clients across the lifespan. 

Spring only 

340 Communication Disorders and Aging 2 credits 

This course will expose students to communication in the adult and aging population. 
The course will cover information relaTed to normal age-related changes that occur 
throughout the body and their impact on speech, language, and hearing. Information 
also will be presented on the common communication disorders present in older adults. 

Fall only 

350 Adult Communication Disorders 3 credits 

An overview of basic anatomy of those portions of the central nervous system that 
control swallowing and human communication will be provided. The course will prepare 
students for an advanced study of speech and language development and neurogenic 
communication disorders of children and adults. 

Prerequisite SLP 210, SLP 220. Spring only 

410 Aural Rehabilitation 3 credits 

Information and strategies for aural habilitation intervention with children and adults who 
have hearing loss will be covered. Models of audiological intervention will be presented. 
Topics to be addressed include hearing aids, assistive technology, speech reading, 
auditory training, communication strategies and counseling techniques. 

Fall only 

415 Observation and Clinical Procedures II 2 credits 

This course prepares students for the first clinical experience. Student will plan, 
implement, and evaluate at least one (1) therapy session with a client based on the 
information learned in class. A minimum of 5 clock hours of observation will be required. 

Prerequisite SLP 305. Fall only 

450 Optional Clinic 3 credits 

This is an undergraduate in-house practicum assignment for exceptional students in the 
second semester of the junior year. This course includes writing lesson plans, reports, 
and case histories of a detailed nature for individuals or groups of persons who exhibit 
speech, language, or hearing problems. An experience in working with individuals or 
groups of persons who exhibit speech or hearing problems is included. 

Prerequisite SLP 305, SLP 415. Spring only 

500 Articulation and Phonological Disorders 3 credits 

An examination of normal and deviant articulatory acquisition and behavior will be 
covered. Presentation of major theoretical orientations and the therapeutic principles will 
be discussed. 

Fall only 



228 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



505 Clinic I (sec l-IV) 3 credits 

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year 
of study. The student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and 
remediation of communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, 
and hearing impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students are 
learning in the academic coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of 
a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the 
certificate of clinical competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association. 

510 Fluency Disorders 3 credits 

Theories, assessment and treatment techniques for persons with fluency disorders 
across the lifespan will be covered. 

Spring only 

515 Hearing Seminar 1 credit 

Students will receive hands-on experiences in audiometric testing and audiological 
intervention within the scope of practice for speech-language pathology students. 

525 Child Language Disorders 3 credits 

This course provides an overview and evaluation of the language skills of preschool and 
school aged children including metalinguistic and discourse development. Contemporary 
theory and practice in language assessment and intervention for children from birth 
through high school will be reviewed. 

Spring only 

530 Vocal and Velopharyngeal Disorders 3 credits 

The study of etiology, symptoms, and treatment strategies for a variety of vocal and 
velopharyngeal disorders will be covered. 

Fall only 

540 Augmentative and Alternative Communication 3 credits 

Assessment and intervention strategies and technology for individuals with severe 
communication impairments will be covered. 

Summer only 

545 Aphasia and Cognitive Communication Disorders 3 credits 

Neurological and psychological aspects of aphasia and other cognitive communication 
disorders will be covered. Assessment and intervention approaches will be discussed 
and evaluated. v 

Fall only 

555 Diagnostic Clinic in Communication Disorders 1 credit 

Supervised practicum experience in performing in-depth diagnostic evaluations with 
individuals exhibiting any type of speech, hearing, or language dysfunction will be 
included. Students will gain experience in obtaining case history information, 
administering diagnostic tests, conferring with parents or their responsible party, and 
writing reports. 

Corequisite SLP 560 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 229 



560 Differential Diagnosis in Communication Disorders 3 credits 

This course covers an introduction to formal and informal procedures for evaluating and 
diagnosing speech and language disorders, selection of tests and techniques, validity 
and reliability of procedures, interview techniques appropriate to a case history, 
preparation of evaluation and case history reports, as well as preparation of 
management programs. 

Corequisite SLP 555 

565 Speech-language Pathology Seminar I 1 credit 
This course will cover the American Speech-language Pathology Code of Ethics, 
Licensure Handbook of Pennsylvania, clinical policies and procedures, clinical 
documentation, and clinical issues regarding client care. 

Fall only 

566 Speech-language Pathology Seminar II 1 credit 
This course will cover resume building, school and hospital issues in speech-language 
pathology, development of therapeutic intervention strategies and materials, and clinical 
issues regarding client care. 

Spring only 

575 Motor Speech Disorders 3 credits 

A study of the medical, physical, occupational, speech, language and hearing problems 
of the neuro-motorically impaired client will be covered. Assessment and therapy 
techniques are reviewed and evaluated. 

Fall only 

585 Speech-language Pathology Seminar III 3 credits 

This course may change from year to year. At present, Interviewing and counseling skills 
related to speech and language disorders across the lifespan is taught in this course. 

Spring only 

590 Dysphagia 3 credits 

Information and training in the evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders 
throughout the lifespan is covered in this course. 

Summer only 

601 Summer Clinic I (sections l-IV) 3 credits 

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year 
of study. The course is offered in the summer semester. The student will receive hands- 
on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in 
persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is 
intended to supplement what students learn in academic coursework and will be 
accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed 
speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 

Summer only 



230 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



602 Summer Clinic II (sections l-IV) 3 credits 

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year 
of study. The course is offered in the summer semester and is typically taken after the 
student has completed SLP 505, SLP 605, or SLP 601 . The student will receive hands- 
on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of communication disorders in 
persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing impairments. This practicum is 
intended to supplement what students learn in academic coursework and will be 
accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical staff, or a licensed 
speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical competence from the 
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 

Summer only 

605 Clinic II (sec l-IV) 3 credits 

This is an in-house or off-campus practicum assignment for students in the senior year 
of study. The course is usually taken after a student has completed SLP 505. The 
student will receive hands-on clinical experience in the assessment and remediation of 
communication disorders in persons with a variety of speech, language, and hearing 
impairments. This practicum is intended to supplement what students learn in academic 
coursework and will be accomplished under the supervision of a faculty member, clinical 
staff, or a licensed speech-language pathologist who holds the certificate of clinical 
competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 

610 Fieldwork I 9 credits 

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech 
and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This off- 
campus practicum experience is to be taken in the student's fifth year of study. 

620 Fieldwork II 9 credits 

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech 
and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This off- 
campus practicum experience is to be taken in the student's fifth year of study. This 
practicum experience is to be taken in the student's fifth year of study. This course is 
typically taken after the student has completed SLP 610. 

630 Fieldwork III 6 credits 

Students receive supervised clinical experience with persons presenting various speech 
and/or language disorders, fluency disorders, voice disorders, and dysphagia. This 
practicum is to be taken during the summer term following the student's fifth year of 
study and/or if all practicum requirements have not been met. 

650 Professional Issues k 3 credits 

A seminar devoted to issues pertinent to the field of speech-language pathology, 
including but not limited to pre-professional academic and practicum requirements, 
accreditation standards, ASHA practice policies and guidelines, legislative and 
regulatory policies, business practices, reimbursement issues, certification requirements, 
specialty recognition, licensure requirements, and professional ethics. 

Fall only 

680 Thesis Option 3 credits 

Independent design and implementation of a research study under the supervision of a 
faculty member. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 23 1 



Sport Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
Degree Four-year Track BS, Sport Management, 
Five-year Track BS, Sport Management and MBA 
Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 



The sport management major provides a business-oriented curriculum devised to produce 
graduates who will be successful in today's sports management environment as well as 
prepared for its future. The major allows students to fashion their studies to meet their 
professional and personal needs. 

Sports Management Four-year Track BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 3 




Core 3 


SMG 101 


Introduction to Sport Mgmt. 3 


BUS 105 


Basic Technology 3 


BUS 208 


Principles of Management 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

Core 3 

Core 3 

SMG 110 Sport in Society 3 

BUS 107 Essential Communications 3 
BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 


BUS 207 
SMG 201 
ACC101 


Contemporary Economics 
Sport and Athletic Admin. 
Principles of Accounting 
Elective 


3 
3 
3 
3 


SMG 210 
BUS 306 


Core 3 

Sport Event and Facility 3 

Mgmt. 

Organizational Behavior 3 

Elective 3 


Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 




Core 3 




Core 


3 


SMG 310 


Sport Law 3 


SMG 301 
BUS 352 


Sport Marketing 
Business Law 


3 
3 


BUS 360 
MIS 110 


Management of Human 3 

Resources 

Introduction to Information 3 

Sys. 



232 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Senior Year 


First Semester Total Credits 15 




Core 3 


SMG401 


Sport Economics 3 


BUS 371 


Finance 3 


BUS 415 


International Business 3 




Elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 12 

SMG410 Internship 12 

Total required for graduation 123 credits 



For description and requirements of the Five-year Track BS, Sport Management and MBA, see 
MBA program description, page 324. 

Sport Management Course Descriptions (SMG) 

101 Introduction to Sport Management 3 credits 

The course examines the discipline of sport management. Areas to be covered include: 
careers in the industry, growth trends in the industry, and an overview of the 
management of a variety of sport organizations including professional and intercollegiate 
athletics. 

110 Sport in Society 3 credits 

This course provides students with an understanding of the relationship between sport 
and the society we live in. Theoretical framework, assumptions, and principles 
associated with this phenomenon will be examined. Students will be encouraged to think 
critically about sport and the place it holds in social life. Using this body of knowledge, 
the student will complete a research paper on a topic such as deviance in sport, youth 
sports, sport and race, etc. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101 

201 Sport and Athletic Administration 3 credits 

Sport and Athletic Administration will provide the student an understanding of the various 
components and activities involved in an athletic or sport program administration. The 
inter-relationship within the institution, tasks to be performed, policies, and procedures 
will be examined. Attention will also be given to the role of the organization's sport or 
athletic leader. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101 

210 Sport Event and Facility Management 3 credits 

This course investigates the fundamental principles in sport event and facility 
management. Various managerial practices will be analyzed. Topics to be discussed 
include, but are not limited to, risk management, event planning, housekeeping and 
maintenance and current trends in the industry. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101 

220 Practicum in Sport Management 1-3 credits 

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply learned sport management 
skills, theories, and ideas in a work experience. This course will allow a student to bridge 
the gap between classroom learning and practical application in a sport setting. This 
course is optional. The practicum will be a minimum of four weeks working forty hours 
per credit earned. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101, SMG 110, and completion of at least 30 credits 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 233 



301 Sport Marketing 3 credits 

This course focuses on the application of marketing principles and practices relevant to 
the sport industry. Theoretical and practical applications of marketing professional and 
amateur sports are examined. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101 and BUS 269 

310 Sport Law 3 credits 

Sport Law examines the legal environment in which professional and amateur sports 
presently operate. Included will be aspects of tort, contract, labor, and antitrust law as 
they apply to the sport industry. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101, SMG 110 and BUS 352 

401 Sport Economics 3 credits 

This comprehensive course focuses on methods and procedures as they apply to the 
economics of sport. Areas such as cost analysis, purchasing, budgeting, and what a 
franchise means to a municipality will be examined. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101 SMG 110 and BUS 207 

410 Sport Management Internship 12 credits 

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply learned sport management 
skills, theories, and ideas in a work experience. The internship is designed to be an in- 
depth experience and students are encouraged to consider internship sites that reflect 
their own career aspirations in the sport industry. The internship will be a minimum of 
twelve weeks working forty hours per week. 

Prerequisite: SMG 101, SMG 110, SMG 301, SMG 310, completion of at least 90 
credits and permission of the instructor 



Teacher Education Programs 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Department Co-Chairs Susan Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

Faculty 

Michele Brague, Assistant Professor of Education, BS Keene State College; M.Ed. Plymouth State 
College 

Stephen Broskoske, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misehcordia; MS Wilkes 
University; EdD Lehigh University 

Joan L. Krause, Associate Professor Emeritus of Education, BS College Misehcordia; MS 
Marywood University; MS University of Scranton 

Patricia Marie McCann, RSM, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misehcordia; MS 
University of Scranton; EdD Lehigh University 

Joseph P. Rogan, Professor of Education, BA Kutztown University; MA Marywood University; EdD 
Lehigh University 

Susan R. Tomascik, Associate Professor of Education, BA Wilkes College; MS College 
Misehcordia; PhD Marywood University 

Molly Vitale, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misehcordia; MA, PhD The 
Pennsylvania State University 



234 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Mission 

The teacher education department (TED) is committed to preparing excellent teachers. One of 
the university's first majors, the teacher education program embraces Misericordia University's 
long-standing mission and continues to reflect the values of our founders: mercy, justice, 
service, and hospitality. Through the TED, we seek to develop teachers who are masters of 
the content they will teach and who will teach in pedagogically sound ways that inspire all 
students to learn. Using educational theory and methodology courses within the liberal arts 
core, we intend to provide a variety of learning opportunities to facilitate a thorough knowledge 
of human development and an appreciation of its diversity so that, as teachers, graduates will 
understand, respect, and respond to the unique strengths, needs, and desires presented by 
students and their families. Through coursework and field-based activities conducted in 
collaboration with partnering schools and agencies, our teacher candidates study, observe, 
and apply strategies that structure learning experiences and environments and that are 
responsive to students' needs. Through teaching, supervision, and personal example, faculty 
intend to establish the expectation that we and our students will conduct ourselves at all times 
in accordance with the highest standards of ethical practice and professionalism. The faculty 
strives to develop in our graduates a commitment to on-going professional and personal 
growth. 

The Teacher Education Department 

Since its inception in 1924, Misericordia University has prepared thousands of excellent 
teachers for our nation's classrooms. Currently, the teacher education department (TED) 
sponsors undergraduate majors in elementary education, special education, and in five areas 
of secondary education - biology, chemistry, citizenship/social studies, English, and 
mathematics. In combination with its elementary education major, the TED also sponsors a 
certification program in early childhood education. The faculty has developed an integrated 
program that combines elementary and special education. At the graduate level, the teacher 
education department sponsors specializations in elementary education, educational 
strategies, instructional technology and supervisor of curriculum and instruction. 

All of the teacher education programs have been reviewed and approved by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Schools and the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The 
programs qualify students for instructional, specialist, or supervisory certifications awarded by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Additionally, the programs offered by the teacher 
education department have earned "candidate status" awarded by the prestigious Teacher 
Education Accreditation Council (TEAC), a national accrediting agency affiliated with the 
Commission on Higher Education of the United States Department of Education. 

Note: The TED curriculum will undergo revision in the near future pending changes in 
Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) requirements for teacher certification. 
Department of Education (PDE) requirements for teacher certification. 

Undergraduate Certifications 

Early Childhood Education 

This program prepares teachers to work in pre-school through third grade. 

Elementary Education 

This program prepares teachers to work in kindergarten through sixth grade. 

Secondary Education 

This program prepares teachers to work in secondary education (junior and senior high 

schools). They are prepared to teach biology, chemistry, citizenship/social studies, English, or 

mathematics. 

Special Education (Cognitive, Behavior, Physical/Health Disabilities) 

This program prepares teachers to work with students with mental and/or physical disabilities 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 235 



from birth through age 21. These students include those with mental retardation, learning 
disabilities, emotional disturbances, physical handicaps, and multi-handicaps. 

Graduate Specializations 

Elementary Education 

This program prepares teachers currently certified in other areas to teach in elementary 

schools (K-6), page 334. 

Special Education 

This program prepares teachers currently certified in other areas, as well as individuals who 

do not hold an Instructional I certificate, to teach in grades N-12. 

Educational Strategies 

This program is especially appropriate for certified and practicing teachers and others 

interested in combining professional growth with best practices, page 337. 

Instructional Technology 

This program prepares teachers currently certified to plan and direct technology-based 

programs in schools and organizations, page 333. 

Supervisor of Instruction and Curriculum 

This graduate program prepares teachers currently certified to direct curriculum development 

programs and to supervise teachers, page 333. 

Graduate Certificate Programs 

Teaching English As A Second Language (ESL) 

This program prepares teachers currently certified to obtain an ESL Program Specialist 
certificate. Further information about this certificate program is located under Teaching English 
As A Second Language, page 307. 

Selection, Retention, Advancement, and Graduation Criteria, Undergraduate 
To ensure quality, the TED uses a series of assessments to monitor students' progress 
through their programs. Information gathered from these assessments is used to make 
admission, program entry, retention, advancement, and graduation decisions. Procedures 
specific to the policies that govern retention in the teacher education program are delineated in 
the teacher education department guide book. All students will enter TED programs as pre- 
education majors and are eligible to register for 100 and 200 level TED courses only. Students 
must qualify for education major status in order to be eligible to register for 300- and 400-level 
TED courses. 

1 . Undergraduate Admissions Process (traditional and transfer students) 

2. Initial admissions decisions are made by the admissions office. They suggest that 
applicants be accepted to the University to participate in programs offered by the TED 
only if they meet the following criteria: 

3. Participation in a rigorous high school curriculum, with posted grades that placed them 
in the top half of their graduating high school classes or in which they earned a "B" or 
better average. External (from other colleges) and internal transfers (from other 
Misericordia majors) must have a 3.0 GPA. Prospective transfer students must meet 
with the TED's chair before enrolling in any TED courses. 

4. Demonstration of an interest and commitment to becoming teachers by participating in 
volunteer, extracurricular, and/or independent activities in which they interacted with 
groups of children. 

a. The ability to demonstrate that they can meet a series of essential performance 
skills typically expected of classroom teachers. 

b. Sophomore Competency Examination 



236 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



During finals week of each semester, students (including recent transfers), must 
complete the sophomore competency examination, which assesses their ability to 
integrate information learned in the following courses: 

TED 231 Learning TED 241 Development 

TED 251 Curriculum TED 261 Teaching 

TED 271 Classroom Management 

Formal Program Acceptance Process 

1 . Faculty considers the results of the initial review process, and the sophomore 
competency examination, along with other information such as GPA and 
PRAXIS I scores, before it formally admits students to the Teacher Education 
Department. To apply for formal program acceptance as sophomores, students 
must present: 

2. an application for TED formal acceptance; 

3. results of the sophomore competency examination; 

4. satisfactory grades/reports from Sophomore Field 1 (TED 292) and Sophomore 
Field 2 (TED 293); 

5. satisfactory completion of ENG 103 English Composition, ENG English 
Literature Core (American or British Literature), ENG English literature core 
(any), MTH Mathematics Bank I, MTH Mathematics Bank II (Statistics) as 
required by major; 

6. evidence of participation in professional associations and organizations, 
including the education club or the secondary education club, and at least one 
major-related professional organization, 

7. the information that indicates respected the TED's ethics policy; 

8. at least one TED faculty recommendation; 

9. a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above after at least 48 credits, (at least 24 credits 
for transfer students) which include English composition, American literature, 
and two college-level math courses. In all TED courses, students must earn a 
"C+" or better; and, 

10. scores from PRAXIS I (reading, writing, and math subtests) that meet or 
exceed the state's cut scores. 

Junior Independent Project 

During the fall semester, juniors must individually suggest, develop, and publicly 
present a poster session on a topic approved by their TED advisors. The 
presentations take place during American Education Week (third week of 
November). 

Junior Group Project 

During the spring semester, juniors, in cooperation with a least two and no more 
than four peers, must suggest, develop, and publicly present a poster session on a 
topic approved by their TED advisors. The presentations take place during the last 
week of the semester (i.e., in relation to National Teacher Recognition Day). 

Student Teaching Acceptance Process 

At the end of the junior year, the TED faculty review all juniors. The review is used 
to determine which students will be recommended for student teaching and 
graduation. Data which must be submitted by students include: 

1 . a completed application for Student Teaching (TED 497); or 

2. grades/reports from Junior Field (TED 394); 

3. grades/reports from Junior Practicum (TED 395); 

4. evidence of participation in professional associations and organizations, 
including the education club or secondary education club, and at least one 
major-related professional organization, 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 237 



5. evidence of completed the PRAXIS II -Fundamental subjects: Content 
knowledge test [All K-6 & K-12 Instruc. Areas (not 7-12)]; 

6. information which indicates respect of the teacher education department's 
ethics policy; 

7. at least two TED faculty recommendations; and, 

8. a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above, 
g. National Teachers Examination 

Senior students must complete sections of PRAXIS II - The National Teachers 
Examination (i.e., those required of their specialization-see www.pde.state.pa.us), 
and meet or exceed the cut scores established by PDE in order to apply for 
certification. 

h. Senior Portfolio Presentation 

Throughout their programs, teacher education students are expected to continually 
develop portfolios, which they may eventually use in employment interviews. In 
Senior Seminar (TED 401), students receive guidance in developing presentation 
portfolios, and during the spring semester of their senior year, students must share 
their presentation portfolios with the TED faculty. Presentation portfolios must 
include: 

1 . a letter written by the student which reviews why he or she wants to be a 
teacher, and introduces portfolio reviewers to the contents of his or her 
portfolio; 

2. a current resume; 

3. a transcript, the results of all assessment activities (i.e., PRAXIS I and II 
scores), and clearances (e.g., Act 34, 114 and 151); 

4. a photographic essay of their work during student teaching; 

5. a video/audio taped sample lesson; 

6. sample projects done in courses and field experience, including student 
teaching; 

7. as appropriate, parts of ten complete TED Cross Course Modules; and, 

8. three letters of recommendation, one written by a peer, two by TED faculty, 
i. Course Requirements 

To ensure that the educational experiences offered by the TED are both uniform and 
developmental, the TED faculty has established two sets of "modules" (i.e., Learning 
Activity Packages). One set is course-based; the other transcends course 
boundaries and migrates with students through their programs. 

Each course has specified numbers of objectives to complete. There is one course 
module for each objective. Each course module structures teaching and learning 
with a series of prescribed activities and is assessed with a module-referenced 
assessment (both equal to 40 percent of final grade). Each course also has a course 
project (10 percent of final grade) and a final examination (50 percent of final grade). 

Rather than just hope its courses and experiences mesh, the faculty uses cross 
course modules to help students knit courses and experience into meaningful 
wholes. A cross course module might start in one course, be developed in a second, 
and completed in a third. Students must independently complete the cross course 
modules by the time they enter Senior Seminar (TED 401 ). Most course projects 
(listed in each course syllabus) can be included in one or more of the cross course 
modules. There are 10 cross course modules, including: 

1. foundations; 

2. development; 

3. learning; 

4. curriculum; 

5. teaching/testing; 

6. technology and media; 



238 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



7. issues and research; 

8. professional and career development; 

9. field placements; and 

10. resources 
Grading 

The TED faculty believes it is dangerous to allow students who know only a small 
percentage of what they are supposed to know to progress in their programs. 
Therefore, TED students are not allowed to progress, to student teach, or to 
graduate until and unless they have demonstrated (through quizzes, projects, 
examinations, etc.) that they have mastered all of the TED's objectives. Students 
must earn a "C+" or better in all TED courses. 

The TED faculty uses module-based assessments formatively. Students who earn 
less than a mastery-level score on an assessment may be required, with certain 
restrictions (and perhaps with additional instruction) to make a second attempt to 
demonstrate mastery. While it would be ideal to allow additional attempts, the TED 
faculty believes that, at the college-level level, two opportunities to demonstrate 
mastery are sufficient. 

Because they are usually not done or submitted until close to the end of a semester, 
the TED faculty can only use course projects summatively. While students are 
working on their projects, they may seek help and feedback from instructors; 
however, once they submit their projects, they will be graded. 

Final exams, which in all cases are cumulative (all of a course's objectives are 
assessed), will be graded only summatively. 

Although the TED faculty refuse to "teach to the test," they construct and administer 
assessments and final examinations to parallel PRAXIS II- The National Teacher 
Examination. 

TED faculty convert assessment and exam raw scores to produce percentage 
scores for objective items (multiple choice, etc.) and, eventually, letter grades. They 
score essays included on quizzes and final examinations, and projects, against 
rubrics. 

Students must post at least a "C+" in all TED courses. 

Academic Integrity and the Teacher Education Department Honor Code 

At the beginning of every course, instructors inform students of the details of the 
TED's academic integrity policy (see TED Guidebook). The policy states that 
students are expected to do their own work (except when cooperative projects are 
assigned). If it is demonstrated that a student has submitted work done by others of 
falsified information; the student's work is awarded a failing grade and the student is 
charged with a violation of the TEDs academic integrity policy. 

Student Teaching 

Student Teaching (TED 497) is a semester-long formal experience that takes place 
during a students last semester before graduation and/or certification. It is a 
culminating experience and is accompanied by a student teaching professional 
seminar that meets several times throughout the semester. The PA Department of 
Education requires the formal evaluation of all students with the Pennsylvania 
Statewide Evaluation Form for Student Professional Knowledge and Practice (PDE 
430 Form). The PDE 430 Form is a performance-based assessment that serves as 
a permanent record of a student teacher's professional performance on specific 
criteria during the student teaching experiences. To comply with the PDE 430 
mandate the TED faculty believe it is in the best interest of each student to be 
supervised by a Misericordia University trained supervisor. As a result, students 
applying for student teaching are required to select student teaching placements 
that fall within a 50-mile radius from Misericordia University. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 239 



m. Graduation 

Students must meet all of the requirements for at least one TED program to be 
recommended for graduation. If students have met all requirements except student 
teaching and if they have completed at least 120 credits, they may graduate with a 
degree in Professional Studies but will not be candidates for teacher certification. 

n. Teacher Certifications 

Students who have completed one or more of the programs sponsored by the TED 
and a series of other requirements set by accrediting organizations (PRAXIS I and II 
scores, Act 34, 114 and 151 clearances, etc.), may be recommended for certification 
to the Pennsylvania Department of Education and/or other certifying organizations. 
Students may also opt to qualify for certifications provided by other states. 

Program Goals 

TED faculty have combined the goals of the university with those suggested by PDE and other 
groups to produce 15 departmental goals, from which they have identified a series of 
objectives (i.e., competency statements which students must meet). The objectives for given 
courses are listed in course syllabi. 

Communication Skills 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall demonstrate that they have the knowledge 
and skills needed to confidently and effectively communicate with students, other 
professionals, families, and members of their communities, using both oral and written words. 

Mental and Physical Skills 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall demonstrate that they possess the mental 
and physical skills and tolerance for stress needed to function as classroom teachers. 

Commitment to Students 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall demonstrate a sincere commitment to the 

education of all students and be willing to advocate for children and their families. 

Foundations of Education 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall explain sociological and philosophical 
factors that have led to the development of and that currently support and regulate educational 
practices, including Pennsylvania's Code of Conduct and Practice for Teachers. In doing so, 
they shall evidence a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities of classroom 
teachers, as well as the rights and responsibilities of students and their families. 

Growth and Development 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall explain how students grow and develop, 
and they must demonstrate a willingness and ability to adjust their teaching to meet the needs 
of individual students, including students with special needs. Graduates shall be especially 
sensitive to the challenges faced by female students, students with disabilities, and members 
of minority groups. 

Learning 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall use research to explain the processes and 

complexities of learning and use this knowledge to plan and implement teaching and learning 



240 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



activities that support the intellectual, social, emotional, career, and personal development of 
students. 

Curriculum Structure 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall explain how curriculum is developed, 
structured, regulated, and used by teachers to plan, monitor, and evaluate instruction and 
students' learning. Students shall demonstrate a clear understanding of the Pennsylvania 
academic standards.. 

Content Mastery 

Graduates of the teacher education program will demonstrate mastery of the curriculum they 
will be expected to teach and a willingness to engage in professional development activities, 
which ensure their continued mastery. 

Basic Teaching Processes 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall demonstrate the ability to: effectively 

organize classrooms and educational spaces so that they are conducive to learning and which 

ensure students' safety and security; analyze data and situations to make decisions which 

benefit students; and plan, implement, and assess direct instruction within a mastery learning 

paradigm. 

Advanced Teaching Processes 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall effectively implement a variety of advanced 
teaching procedures that allow students, independently and cooperatively, multiple pathways 
to learning and that encourage them to explore and understand challenging concepts, topics, 
and issues. 



Classroom Management 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall demonstrate a willingness and ability to use 
an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create learning 
environments that encourage positive social interaction, active learning, critical thinking and 
problem-solving, and independence. They will be devoted to creating schools and classrooms 
that are welcoming, caring, stimulating, inclusive, and safe places in which students are 
challenged to take risks, make choices, work independently and collaboratively, and are 
supported in their growth and development. v 

Family Involvement 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall acknowledge and respect the roles and 
responsibilities of parents and families, and shall be willing to enter into partnership 
arrangements with those interested in the education of students. 

Respect for Diversity 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall see diversity as normal, and evidence an 
authentic respect for all students, families, coworkers, and school personnel. They should see 
themselves as teachers prepared to work with all students without regard to factors related to 
gender, race, creed, economic status, physical attributes, or ability. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 24 1 



Personal and Collegial 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall know and be comfortable with themselves in 
ways that cause them to be willing and able to work effectively with students, other 
professionals, and parents. 

Professional 

Graduates of the teacher education program shall be fully aware of their profession's 
standards and practices, including its codes of ethics (e.g., Pennsylvania's Code of Conduct 
and Practice for Teachers); look forward to being contributing members and active leaders of 
their profession; and function ethically and responsibly as members of their communities. 

Structure of the Curriculum 

Currently, the university's undergraduate teacher education programs have five components. 
In light of the recent changes to Pennsylvania's certification guidelines (Chapter 49-2), the 
TED is in the process of revising its curriculum to be in compliance with the new regulations. 

1 . Core 

All teacher education program students are expected to complete the university's 
general education requirement (i.e., the "Core"). Thirty core credits, of which at least 
six must be writing-intensive, must be taken in areas sponsored by the College of 
Arts and Sciences (i.e., six each in history/government, religious studies, fine arts, 
literature, and philosophy); six must be taken in mathematics; six in science; and six 
in areas sponsored by the College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences (i.e., 
comparative sociology, contemporary economics, and/or introduction to 
psychology). Additionally, students must complete English Composition. 

2. Introductory and Generic TED Courses 

All teacher education program students must complete a set of introductory-level 
teacher education requirements. Additionally, all seniors will have to complete 
Student Teaching (TED 497) and attend the student teaching professional seminar. 

3. Specializations 

All TED students must complete the requirements of one or more of the TED's 
specializations (e.g., elementary education). 

4. Field Experiences 

All TED students must complete a developmental series of field experiences that 
begin during the first year and culminate with a full semester of student teaching. By 
the time they graduate, students will have completed more than 700 hours of 
observation and practicum in community classrooms. 

Field experiences are arranged at partnership school districts by the TED. Students 
must possess professional liability insurance and various clearances (for example, 
Act 34, 114 and Act 151) to participate in field placements. Students must arrange 
their own transportation. 

5. Professional Involvement 

All students will be expected to participate in activities and organizations related to 
the profession of teaching. 



242 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Elementary Education Major 

Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education Certifications 

Degree BS, Elementary Education 

Department Chairs Susan Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

The early childhood education (ECED) program is designed to prepare teachers to work with 
preschool children, either as teachers or as operators of private preschool or nursery centers 
(nursery through third grade). The program builds upon the elementary education (ELED) 
program (kindergarten through sixth grade). 

Pre-service teachers in ELED/ECED must successfully complete the liberal arts core 
curriculum, a series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses and field 
experiences, and the courses and experiences required by the two TED specializations - early 
childhood and elementary education. 

ELED/ECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin 
during the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers wili have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semesters, they must complete a 15-week student teaching 
assignment (two separate placements). One placement is in ECED and the other is in an 
ELED. 

Students who successfully complete the ELED/ECED program are eligible for recommendation 
by the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for two teacher certifications. 
The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements 
established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the state on the 
PRAXIS I and II, qualify graduates for "Instructional I" certificates. Once certified in 
Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in other states. 

Early Childhood Education Elementary Education BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

ENG 103 English Composition 3 

BIO/CH Natural Science Core 
M/PHY (one sequence) 

HIS/POL Hist/Pol Sci Core (one seq.) 
ENG Eng Lit Core 

(Amer or Brit Lit req.) 
PSY123 Introduction to Psychology 
TED 101 Freshman Seminar or 
TED 102 Transfer Seminar 



Second Semester Total Credits 15 

ENG English Literature Core (any) 3 

NaturaJ Science Core 3 
(one sequence) 

Hist/Pol Sci Core (one seq.) 3 

Introduction to Education 3 

Educational Technology 3 

Freshman Field 



3 


BIO/CHM 




/PHY 


3 


HIS/POL 


3 


TED 111 




TED 121 


3 


TED 191 













Bachelor's Degree Programs 243 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


SOC101 


Comparative Sociology 


3 


RLS 


Religious Studies 3 


PHL100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


FA 


Fine Arts Core 3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank II 3 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 




(Statistics) 


TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field I 





TED 261 
TED 271 
TED 293 


Teaching 3 
Classroom Management 2 
Sophomore Field II 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


TED 381 


Reading Methods I 


3 


TED 382 


Reading Methods II 3 


TED 384 


Math Methods I 


3 


TED 385 


Math Methods II 3 


TED 353 


Curriculum/Elementary 


1 


TED 386 


Art Methods 1 


TED 363 


Methods/Elementary 


2 


TED 387 


Music Methods 1 


TED 388 


Methods/Language Arts 


3 


TED 373 


Management/Elementary 1 


TED 389 


Methods/Science 


3 


TED 390 


Methods/Social Studies 2 


TED 394 


Junior Field 





TED 391 


Methods/Health 2 


TED 352 


Curriculum/ECED 


3 


TED 362 
TED 395 


Methods/ECED 3 
Junior Practicum 1 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 

PHL Philosophy Core 3 

FA Fine Arts 3 

RLS Religious Studies Core 3 

TED 383 Reading Methods III 3 

TED 360 Children's Literature 2 

TED 443 Parent Conferencing 1 

TED 401 Senior Seminar 

TED 496 Senior Field 



Second Semester Total Credits 12 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 



244 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Elementary Education Major, Elementary Education Certification 

Elementary Education Certification 
Degree BS, Elementary Education 
Department Co-Chairs, Susan Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

The elementary education (ELED) program has been continually refined to keep pace with 
developments in the field of education and to meet the ever-increasing standards of various 
professional and accrediting groups. The program is approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education and leads to a teaching certificate valid in Pennsylvania 
(kindergarten through sixth grade) and transferable to many other states. Currently, 
Pennsylvania has signed an interstate agreement with 45 other states/jurisdictions. 

Pre-service teachers in ELED must successfully complete the university's liberal arts core 
curriculum, a series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses and field 
experiences, and the courses and experiences required by at least on TED specialization (for 
example, elementary education). 

ELED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin during the 
second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By graduation, 
our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community classrooms. During 
students' final semester, they must complete a 15-week student teaching assignment (two 
separate placements). 

Students who successfully complete the ELED program are eligible for recommendation by the 
university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for state teacher certification. The 
university's recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements established 
by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the state on PRAXIS l-The 
Preprofessional Skills Test and PRAXIS II— The National Teacher Examination, qualify 
graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate in elementary education. Once certified in 
Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in other states. 

ELED majors may elect to complete the requirements for certification in early childhood 
education (ECED) and/or they may choose to declare a second TED major in special 
education (SPED). The additional coursework might require additional semesters, or at least 
summer study. 

Elementary Education Certification Elementary Education BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


ENG103 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


English Literature Core 3 


BIO/CH 
M/PHY 


Natural Science Core (one 
sequence) 


3 


BIO/CH 


(any) 

Natural Science Core (one 3 


HIS/POL 


Hist/Pol Sci Core (one 
seq.) 


3 


M/PHY 
HIS/POL 


sequence) 

Hist/Pol Sci Core (one 3 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core (Amer or Brit 
Lit req.) 




TED 111 


seq.) 

Introduction to Education 3 


PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


TED 121 


Educational Technology 3 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar or 





TED 191 


Freshman Field 


TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 










Bachelor's Degree Programs 245 



Sophomore Year 

First Semester 
SOC 101 
PHL 100 
MTH 



TED 231 
TED 241 
TED 292 



Total Credits 1 5 Second Semester Total Credits 17 

RLS Religious Studies 3 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 

MTH Mathematics Bank II 3 

(Statistics) 

TED 251 Curriculum 3 

TED 261 Teaching 3 

TED 271 Classroom Management 2 

TED 293 Sophomore Field II 



Comparative Sociology 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 

Mathematics Bank I 3 

Learning 3 

Development 3 

Sophomore Field I 



Junior Year 






First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second £ 


TED 381 


Reading Methods I 


3 


TED 382 


TED 384 


Mathematics Methods I 


3 


TED 385 


TED 353 


Curriculum/Elementary 


1 


TED 386 


TED 363 


Methods/Elementary 


2 


TED 387 


TED 388 


Methods/Language Arts 


3 


TED 373 


TED 389 


Methods/Science 


3 


TED 390 


TED 394 


Junior Field ■ 





TED 391 
TED 395 



nester Total Credits 1 7 

Reading Methods II 3 

Mathematics Methods II 3 

Art Methods 1 

Music Methods 1 

Management/Elementary 1 

Methods/Social Studies 2 

Methods/Health 2 

Junior Practicum 1 

Free Elective 3 



Senior Year 


First Semester Total Credits 15 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 3 


FA 


Fine Arts 3 


RLS 


Religious Studies Core 3 


TED 383 


Reading Methods III 3 


TED 360 


Children's Literature 2 


TED 443 


Parent Conferencing 1 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 


TED 496 


Senior Field 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 2 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 



246 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Special Education and Elementary Education Majors 

Special Education and Elementary Education Certifications 

Degree BS, Special Education 

Department Co-Chairs Susan Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

Students majoring in special education may also major in elementary education, thus earning 
two certifications. Doing so may take longer than the standard eight semesters. 

Both certification programs are fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education 
and lead to "Instructional I" teaching certifications (CBP-HD and ELED) honored in 
Pennsylvania and many other states. 

SPED/ELED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin during 
the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semester they must complete a 15-week student teaching 
assignment (two separate placements for about seven weeks each). One placement is in 
elementary education and the other in special education. 

Students who successfully complete the SPED/ELED program are eligible for recommendation 
by the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for two state teacher 
certifications. The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other 
requirements established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the 
state on PRAXIS I and II, qualify graduates for two "Instructional I" certificates in special 
education and elementary education. Once certified in Pennsylvania, our graduates usually 
have no difficulty becoming certified in other states. 

Special Education BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 



First Year 










First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


ENG 103 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


English Literature Core (any) 


3 


BIO/CHM 


Natural Science Core 


3 


BIO/CHM 


Natural Science Core 


3 


/PHY 


(one sequence) 




/PHY 


(one sequence) 




HIS/POL 


Hist/Pol Sci Core (one seq.) 




HIS/POL 


Hist/Pol Sci Core (one seq.) 


3 


ENG 


Core (Amer or Brit Lit req.) 


3 


TED 111 


Introduction to Education 


3 


PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


TED 121 


Educational Technology 


3 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar or 





TED 191 


Freshman Field 





TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 












Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second £ 


SOC101 


Comparative Sociology 


3 


RLS 


PHL100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


FA 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 




TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 251 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field I 





TED 261 
TED 271 
TED 293 



lester Total Credits 1 7 

Religious Studies 3 

Fine Arts Core 3 

Mathematics Bank II 3 
(Statistics) 

Curriculum 3 

Teaching 3 

Classroom Management 2 

Sophomore Field II 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 24 7 



Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 1 9 


Second Semester Total Credits 22 


TED 381 


Reading Methods I 


3 


TED 382 


Reading Methods II 3 


TED 384 


Math Methods I 


3 


TED 385 


Math Methods II 3 


TED 353 


Curriculum/Elementary 


1 


TED 390 


Methods/Social Studies 2 


TED 354 


Curriculum/Special 


1 


TED 391 


Methods/Health 2 


TED 363 


Methods/Elementary 


2 


TED 365 


Methods/Learning Support 3 


TED 388 


Methods/Language Arts 


3 


TED 373 


Management/Elementary 1 


TED 389 


Methods/Science 


3 


TED 374 


Management/Special 1 


TED 342 


Characteristics MPH 


3 


TED 375 


Management/Support 1 


TED 394 


Junior Field 





TED 364 
TED 386 
TED 387 
TED 395 


Methods/Life Skills 3 
Art Methods 1 
Music Methods 1 
Junior Practicum 1 



Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

PHL Philosophy Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 12 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 



FA 


Fine Arts 


3 


RLS 


Religious Studies Core 
(any) 


3 


TED 383 


Reading Methods III 


3 


TED 360 


Children's Literature 


2 


TED 443 


Parent Conferencing 


1 


TED 322 


Assistive Technology 


2 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 





TED 496 


Senior Field 






Biology Major, Secondary Education Certification 

Secondary Education Certification 

Degree BS, Biology 

Department Chair Cosima Wiese, PhD 

The secondary education program in biology (BIO/SECED) is designed to prepare junior high 
school and secondary school teachers of biology. Our BIO/SECED program has been 
continually refined to keep pace with developments in the profession. It is approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a teaching certificate valid in 
Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) and is transferable to many other states. A unique aspect of the 
program is that it prepares teachers to effectively deal with students with disabilities who are 
likely to be included in their classes. 

Effectively, students majoring in BIO/SECED must complete two majors, one in teacher 
education and one in biology. Accordingly, they have two academic advisors who cooperate to 
keep students on track. Each semester, they must meet with both of their advisors. 



248 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Pre-service teachers in BIO/SECED must successfully complete the liberal arts core 
curriculum, a series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses and field 
experiences, the courses and experiences required by the SECED specialization, and a 
content area major in biology. 

BIO/SECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin during 
the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semester they must complete a 15-week student teaching 
assignment (two separate placements). All field experiences and teaching assignments are 
arranged by Misericordia University. Transportation to and from field experience and student- 
teaching assignments is the responsibility of the student. 

Students who successfully complete the BIO/SECED program are eligible for recommendation 
by Misericordia University to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for state teacher 
certification. This recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements 
established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the state on the 
National Teacher Examination, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. Once 
certified in Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in other 
states. 



Secondary Education Certification, Biology Major 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second S 


CHM 133 


Chemical Principles I 




4 


TED 111 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar 
or 







TED 121 
TED 191 


TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 







BIO 102 


BIO 101 


General Botany and 






CHM 134 




Biological Principles 




4 


MTH 152 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core (Amer or 
Lit req.) 


Brit 


3 




MTH 151 


Calculus 




3 




ENG 103 


English Composition 




3 





ister Total Credits 1 7 

Introduction to Education 3 

Education Technology 3 

Freshman Field 

General Zoology 4 

Chemical Principles ll 4 

Calculus II 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second S 


TED 231 Learning 


3 


TED 251 


TED 241 Development 


3 


TED 261 


TED 292 Sophomore Field I 





TED 271 


BIO 241 Genetics 


4 


TED 293 


BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy 


4 


BIO 243 


and Histology 




CHM 244 


CHM 243 Organic Chemistry 


4 


ENG 



ister Total Credits 19 

Curriculum 3 

Teaching 3 

Classroom Management 2 

Sophomore Field II 

General Microbiology 4 

Organic Chemistry 4 

English Literature Core 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 249 



Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 19 


Second Semester Total Credits 19 


TED 352 


Curriculum in Secondary 
Educ. 


1 


TED 374 


Classroom Manage. 1 
Second. Educ. 


TED 363 


Methods In Secondary 


2 


TED 395 


Junior Practicum 1 




Educ. 




BIO 346 


General Physiology 4 


TED 394 


Junior Field 





PHY 222 


General Physics II 4 


BIO 345 


Developmental Biology 




FA 


Core 3 




or 




HIS 


Core 3 


BIO 435 


Cell Biology 


3 


PHL 100 


Introduction to Philosophy 3 


CHM 353 


Biochemistry I 


3 






PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 






PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 






HIS 


Core 


3 






Senior Year 









First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

TED 443 Parent Conferencing 1 



TED 401 


Senior Seminar 





TED 496 


Senior Field 





BIO 425 


Ecology 


4 


PHL 


Core 


3 


SOC101 


Comparative Sociology 


3 


RLS 


Core 


3 


FA 


Core 


3 



Second Semester Total Credits 12-15 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 

RLS Core 3 

Total required for graduation 141 credits 



English Major, Secondary Education Certification 

Secondary Education Certification 

Degree BA, English 

Department Chair Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

The secondary education program in English (ENG/SECED) is designed to prepare junior high 
school and secondary school teachers of English. Our ENG/SECED program has been 
continually refined to keep pace with developments in the profession. It is fully approved by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a teaching certificate valid in 
Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) and transferable to many other states. A unique aspect of the 
program is that it prepares teachers to deal effectively with students with disabilities who are 
likely to be included in their classes. 

ENG/SECED majors have two advisors, one in teacher education and one in English. Each 
semester students must meet with both advisors. Pre-service teachers in ENG/SECED must 
successfully complete the university's liberal arts core curriculum, the major in English, and a 
series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses. 

ENG/SECED majors must also satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin 
during the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During their final semester, students must complete a 15-week student teaching 



250 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



assignment (two separate placements). All field experiences and teaching assignments are 
arranged by the university. Transportation to and from field experience and student teaching 
assignments is the responsibility of the student. 

Students who successfully complete the ENG/SECED program are eligible for 
recommendation by the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for state 
teacher certification. The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other 
requirements established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the 
state on the national teacher examination, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. 
Once certified in Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in 
other states. 

Secondary Education Certification English BA Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 
First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


ENG 


Core 


3 


ENG 


Core 3 


HIS 


Core 


3 


HIS 


Core 3 


PSY123 


Intro to Psychology 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank II 3 


PHL100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 




(Statistics) 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


TED 111 


Introduction To Education 3 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar or 




TED 121 


Educational Technology 3 


TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 





TED 191 


Freshman Field 


ENG 120 


Theatre Production 


1 







Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 8 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


FA 


Core 


3 


FA 


Core 3 


SCI 


Core 


3 


SCI 


Core 3 


ENG 203 


Advanced Expository 




ENG 


300-level Lit Course 3 




Writing or 




TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


ENG 341 


Imaginative Writing 


3 


TED 261 


Teaching 3 


ENG 215 


Shakespeare 


3 


TED 271 


Class Management 2 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 






TED 241 


Development 


3 






TED 292 


Sophomore Field 









Junior Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HIS 


Advanced History Elective 


3 


HIS 


Advanced History Elective 3 


ENG 


300-Level Lit Course 


3 


ENG 


300-Level LitCourse 3 


ENG 


300-Level Lit Course 


3 


ENG 415 


Selected Studies 3 


RLS 


Core 


3 


PHL 


Core 3 


TED 356 


Curriculum in Secondary Ed 


1 


RLS 


Core 3 


TED 367 


Methods in Secondary Ed. 


2 


TED 377 


Class Mgmt. /Secondary Ed 1 


TED 394 


Junior Field 





TED 395 


Junior Practicum 1 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 25 1 



Senior Year 


First Semester Total Credits 13 


ENG 


300-Level Literature 3 




Course 


ENG415 


Selected Studies 3 


ENG 318 


Language Studies 3 


TED 443 


Parent Conference 1 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 


TED 496 


Senior Field 


SOC101 


Comp. Sociology or 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics 



Second Semester 



Total Credits 12- 
15 



TED 497 Student Teaching 
ENG 420 Senior Seminar or 
ENG 450 Senior Thesis 



12 
3 



Total required for graduation 123 credits 



Chemistry Major, Secondary Education Certification 

Secondary Education Certification 

Degree BS, Chemistry 

Department Chair Charles Saladino, Jr., PhD 

The secondary education program in chemistry (CHM/SECED) is designed to prepare junior 
high school and secondary school teachers of chemistry. The CHM/SECED program has been 
continually refined to keep pace with developments in the profession. It is approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education, and leads to a teaching certificate valid in 
Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) and transferable to many other states. A unique aspect of the 
program is that it prepares teachers to effectively deal with students with disabilities who are 
likely to be included in their classes. 

Students majoring in CHM/SECED must meet requirements in both teacher education and in 
chemistry. Accordingly, they have two academic advisors who cooperate to keep students on 
track. Each semester students must meet with both of their advisors. Pre-service teachers in 
CHM/SECED must successfully complete the liberal arts core curriculum, a series of generic 
teacher education department (TED) courses and field experiences, the courses and 
experiences required by the SECED specialization, and a content area major in chemistry. 

CHM/SECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin 
during the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semester, they must complete a 15-week student-teaching 
assignment (two separate placements). All field experiences and teaching assignments are 
arranged by Misericordia University. Transportation to and from field experience and student 
teaching assignments is the responsibility of the student. Students who successfully complete 
the CHM/SECED program are eligible for recommendation by Misericordia University to the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education for state teacher certification. The university's 
recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements established by the 
state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the state on the National Teacher 
Examination, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. Once certified in 
Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in other states. 



252 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Secondary Education Certification Chemistry BS Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 6 


Second Semester Total Credits 16 


CHM 133 
MTH 151 


Chemical Principles I 
Analytic Geometry & 
Calculus I 


4 
3 


CHM 134 
MTH 152 


Chemical Principles II 4 
Analytic Geometry & 3 
Calculus II 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar 





TED 111 


Introduction to Education 3 


or 
TED 102 


TED 121 
Transfer Seminar 





TED 191 


Educational Technology 3 
Freshman Field 


ENG 103 

PHL 
ENG 


English Composition 
Philosophy Core 
Eng Lit Core (Amer or 
Lit req) 


3 

3 

Brit 3 


ENG 


English Literature Core 3 




Summer 




Total Credits 3 or 6 






History 


Core 


3 or 6 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 19 


CHM 243 


Organic Chemistry I 


4 


CHM 244 


Organic Chemistry II 4 


PHY 221 


Physics I 


4 


CHM 210 


Descriptive Chemistry 3 


MTH 225 


Analytic Geometry & 


4 


PHY 222 


Physics II 4 




Calculus III 




TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 


TED 261 


Teaching 3 


TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 271 


Classroom Management 2 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field 





TED 293 


SophorQore Field II 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

CHM 355 Physical Chemistry I 4 

CHM 350 Chemical Literature 1 

CHM 353 Biochemistry I 3 

TED 352 Curriculum, Secondary 1 

TED 363 Methods, Secondary 2 

RLS Religious Studies Core 3 

TED 394 Junior Field 

FA Fine Arts Core 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

CHM 356 Physical Chemistry II 4 

CHM 411 Instrumental Analysis 3 

CHM 412 Instrumental Lab I 1 

TED 374 Classroom Management, 1 

Secondary 

TED 395 Junior Practicum 1 

PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

CHM 354 Biochemistry II 3 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 253 



Senior Year 






First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second £ 


CHM410 


Advanced Inorganic 


3 


TED 497 




Chemistry 




SOC101 


CHM413 


Instrumental Lab II 


1 




CHM475 


Chemistry Seminar 


1 


Total req 


TED 443 


Parent Conferencing 


1 




TED 401 


Senior Seminar 







TED 496 


Senior Field 







FA 


Fine Arts Core 


3 




RLS 


Religious Studies Core 


3 




PSY123 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




ENG 


Core 


3 





ester Total Credits 12-15 

Student Teaching 12 

Comparative 3 

Sociology 
7~ofa/ required for graduation 132 credits 






History Major, Secondary Education Certification 

Secondary Education Certification 

Degree BA, History 

Department Chair David Wright, PhD 

The secondary education certification in citizenship (CIT/SECED) is designed to prepare junior 
high school and secondary school teachers of history and the other social studies. The 
program emphasizes studies in history with a number of courses in political science, 
geography, sociology, and anthropology. The CIT/SECED program has been continually 
refined to keep pace with developments in the profession. Approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education, it leads to a teaching certificate valid in Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) 
and transferable to many other states. A unique aspect of the program is that it prepares 
teachers to effectively work with students with disabilities who are likely to be included in their 
classes. 

Effectively, students majoring in CIT/SECED must complete two majors, one in teacher 
education and one in history. Accordingly, they have two academic advisors who cooperate to 
keep them on track. Each semester, students must meet with both advisors. 

Pre-service teachers in CIT/SECED must successfully complete the liberal arts core 
curriculum, a series of teacher education department (TED) courses and field experiences, the 
courses and experiences required by the SECED specialization, and a content area major in 
history. 

CIT/SECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin during 
the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semesters, they must complete a 15-week student teaching 
assignment, consisting of two separate placements. All field experiences and teaching 
assignments are arranged by the university. Transportation to and from field experience and 
student teaching assignments is the responsibility of the student. 

Students who successfully complete the SOC/SECED program are eligible for 
recommendation by the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for state 
teacher certification. The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other 
requirements established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the 



254 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



state on the national teacher examination, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. 
Once certified in Pennsylvania, our graduates usually are able to become certified in other 
states.. 

Secondary Education Certification History BA Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 8 


HIS 101 


Western Civilization I 


3 


HIS 102 


Western Civilization II 3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank II 3 


ENG 103 


English Composition 


3 




(Statistics) 


PHL 100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


ENG 


English Lit Core 3 


PSY123 


Introduction to 


3 




(Amer or Brit Lit req.) 




Psychology 




TED 111 


Introduction to Education 3 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar or 





TED 121 


Introduction to Technology 3 


TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 





TED 191 
FA 


Freshman Field 
Fine Arts Core 3 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


ENG 


English Literature Core 


3 


FA 


Fine Arts Core 3 


SCI 


Science Core 


3 


SCI 


Science Core 3 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 


3 


HIS 104 


United States History II 3 


HIS 103 


United States History I 


3 


TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 


TED 261 


Teaching 3 


TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 271 


Classroom Management 2 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field I 





TED 293 


Sophomore Field II 


Junior Year 






v 



First Semester Total Credits 18 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HIS 405 


Seminar on History 


3 


HIS 491 


Research Seminar 3 


RLS 


Core 


3 


GEO 202 


Cultural World Geography 3 


TED 367 


Methods in Secondary 
Ed. 


2 


TED 377 


Classroom Mgmt. in Sec. 1 
Ed. 


TED 356 


Curriculum in Secondary 


1 


TED 395 


Junior Practicum 1 




Ed. 




POL 103 


Global Politics 3 


POL 100 


American National Govt. 


3 


HIS/POL 


Free Elective 3 


BUS 207 


Contemporary Economics 


3 


ENG 


Advanced Elective 3 


HIS 


Advanced Elective 


3 






TED 394 


Junior Field 










Bachelor's Degree Programs 255 



Senior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


HIS 


Advanced Elective 3 


ENG 


Advanced Elective 3 


TED 443 


Parent Conferencing 1 


SOC 221 


Cultural Minorities 3 


HIS 210 


History of England or 3 




Britain 


RLS 


Religion Core 3 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 


TED 496 


Senior Field 



Second Semester Total Credits 12-15 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 

HIS Advanced Elective 3 

Total required for graduation 131 credits 



Mathematics Major, Secondary Education Certification 

Secondary Education Certification 
Degree BS or BA, Mathematics 
Department Chair Patrick Touhey, PhD 

The secondary education program in mathematics (MTH/SECED) is designed to prepare junior 
high school and secondary school teachers of mathematics. The MTH/SECED program has 
been continually refined to keep pace with developments in the profession. It is approved by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to a teaching certificate valid in 
Pennsylvania (grades 7-12) and is transferable to many other states. A unique aspect of the 
program is that it prepares teachers to effectively deal with students with disabilities who are 
likely to be included in their classes. 

Effectively, students majoring in MTH/SECED must complete two majors, one in teacher 
education and one in mathematics. Accordingly, students have two academic advisors who 
cooperate to keep students on track. Each semester they must meet with both of them. Pre- 
service teachers in MTH/SECED must successfully complete the liberal arts core curriculum, a 
series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses and field experiences, the 
courses and experiences required by the SECED specialization, and a content area major in 
mathematics. 

MTH/SECED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin 
during the second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By 
graduation, our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community 
classrooms. During students' final semester, they must complete a 15-week student teaching 
assignment in two separate placements. All field experiences and teaching assignments are 
arranged by the university. Transportation to and from field experience and student teaching 
assignments is the responsibility of the student. 

Students who successfully complete the MTH/SECED program are eligible for 
recommendation by the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for state 
teacher certification. The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other 
requirements established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the 
state on the national teacher examination, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. 
Once certified in Pennsylvania, our graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in 
other states. 



256 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Secondary Education Certification Mathematics BA Degre 
Sequence of Required Courses 



First Year 








First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 


CPS 101 


Intro, to Programming: C++ 


3 


CPS 121 


Computer Programming 3 


MTH 151 


Calculus I 




MTH 152 


Calculus II 3 


ENG 103 


English Composition 


3 
3 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core 3 
Core 3 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core (Am or Brit Lit 


3 


TED 111 


Introduction to Education 3 




req) 




TED 121 


Educational Technology 3 


TED 101 


Core 

Freshman Seminar or 


3 



TED 191 


Freshman Field 


TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 










Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


Second Semester Total Credits 18 


MTH 225 


Calculus III 


4 


MTH 363 


Abstract Algebra I 3 


MTH 244 


Set Theory and Logic 


3 


PHY 222 


General Physics II 4 


PHY 221 


General Physics I 


4 


MTH 215 


Statistics for 3 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 




Mathematicians 


TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field I 





TED 261 
TED 271 
TED 293 


Teaching 3 
Classroom Management 2 
Sophomore Field II 



Junior Year 



First Seme 


ster Total Credits 19 


Second S 


MTH 364 


Abstract Algebra II 


3 


MTH 341 


MTH 241 


Linear Algebra 


3 


MTH 242 


MTH 200 


Historical Perspective of 
Math. 


3 






Core 


3 






Core 


3 


TED 395 


TED 350 


Curriculum in Secondary 
Educ. 


1 




TED 377 


Class Mgmt. in Secondary 
Educ. 


1 




TED 367 


Methods in Secondary Ed. 


2 




TED 394 


Junior Field 








ister * Total Credits 16 

Real Analysis I 3 

Differential Equations 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Core 3 

Junior Practicum 1 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 257 



Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 16 

TED 443 Parent Conferencing 1 

MTH 342 Real Analysis II 3 

MTH 351 Geometry 3 

Free elective 3 





Core 


3 




Core 


3 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 





TED 496 


Senior Field 






Second Semester 



Total Credits 12- 



15 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 

Free elective 3 

Free elective 3 

Total required for graduation 131 credits 






Special Education Major 

Special Education Certification 

(Cognitive, Behavior, Physical/Health Disabilities) 

Degree BS, Special Education 

Director Molly Vitale, PhD 

The special education (SPED) program is designed to prepare teachers to work with 
individuals with cognitive, behavioral, and physical/health disabilities (that is, students who are 
mentally retarded, learning disabled, emotionally disturbed, physically handicapped, or multi- 
handicapped) between the ages of birth and 21 . The program is fully approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education and leads to an "Instructional I" teaching certificate 
(CBP-HD) recognized in Pennsylvania and many other states. 

Pre-service teachers in SPED must successfully complete the liberal arts core curriculum, a 
series of generic teacher education department (TED) courses and field experiences, and the 
courses and experience required by the SPED specialization. 

SPED majors must satisfactorily complete a series of field experiences that begin during the 
second semester of the first year and continue every semester until graduation. By graduation, 
our pre-service teachers will have spent at least 700 hours in community classrooms. During 
students' final semester they must complete a 15-week student teaching assignment (two 
separate placements). 

Students who successfully complete the SPED program are eligible for recommendation by 
the university to the Pennsylvania Department of Education for a state teacher certification. 
The university's recommendation and the successful completion of other requirements 
established by the state, including meeting the pass scores specified by the state on PRAXIS I 
and II, qualify graduates for an "Instructional I" certificate. Once certified in Pennsylvania, our 
graduates usually have no difficulty becoming certified in other states. 

SPED majors may choose to declare a second major in elementary education. SPED/ELED 
graduates would be eligible for certification in both elementary and special education. 



258 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



Special Education Certification Special Education BS Degree 
Sequence of Required Courses 

First Year 



First Semester Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 


ENG 103 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core 3 


PSY123 


Introduction to 
Psychology 


3 


BIO/CHM/ 
PHY 


Natural Science Core 3 


ENG 


Eng Lit Core 

(Amer or Brit Lit req.) 




HIS/POL 


History/Pol Sci Core (one 3 
seq.) 


BIO/CHM/ 


Natural Science Core 


3 


TED 111 


Introduction to Education 3 


PHY 






TED 121 


Educational Technology 3 


HIS/POL 


History/Pol Sci. Core (one 
seq.) 


3 


TED 191 


Freshman Field 


TED 101 


Freshman Seminar or 









TED 102 


Transfer Seminar 










Sophomore Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 


SOC101 


Comparative Sociology 


3 


RLS 


Religious Studies Core 3 


PHL100 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


FA 


Fine Arts Core 3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank I 


3 


MTH 


Mathematics Bank II 3 


TED 231 


Learning 


3 




(Statistics) 


TED 241 


Development 


3 


TED 251 


Curriculum 3 


TED 292 


Sophomore Field I 





TED 261 
TED 271 
TED 293 


Teaching 3 
Classroom Management 2 
Sophomore Field II 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 16 


Second Semester Total Credits 20 


TED 381 


Reading Methods I 


3 


TED 382 


Reading Methods II 3 


TED 384 


Math Methods I 


3 


TED 385 


Math Methods II 3 


TED 354 


Curriculum/Special 


1 


TED 390 


Methods/Social Studies 2 


TED 388 


Methods/Language Arts 


3 


TED 391 


Methods/Health 2 


TED 389 


Methods/Science 


3 


TED 365 


Methods/Learning Support 3 


TED 342 


Characteristics MPH 


3 


TED 373 


Management/Elementary 1 


TED 394 


Junior Field 





TED 374 
TED 375 
TED 364 
TED 395 


Management/Special 1 
Management/Support 1 
Methods/Life Skills 3 
Junior Practicum 1 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 259 



Senior Year 


First Semester Total Credits 1 7 


PHL 


Philosophy Core 3 


FA 


Fine Arts Core 3 


RLS 


Religious Studies Core 3 


TED 383 


Reading Methods III 3 


TED 360 


Children's Literature 2 


TED 443 


Parent Conferencing 1 


TED 322 


Assistive Technology 2 


TED 401 


Senior Seminar 


TED 496 


Senior Field 



Second Semester Total Credits 12 

TED 497 Student Teaching 12 



General Education Course Descriptions (TED) 

101 Freshman Seminar credits 
This non-credit seminar (which is conducted during the first third of the semester) 
introduces students who intend to major in teacher education (all majors) to the TED's 
curriculum and requirements. 

102 Transfer Seminar credits 

This non-credit seminar (which is conducted during the first third of the semester) 
introduces transfer students who intend to major in teacher education (all majors) to the 
TED's curriculum and requirements. 

1 1 1 Introduction to Education 3 credits 

This introductory course introduces first-year students (all majors) to the foundations and 
structures of contemporary education. It surveys the historical, sociological, and 
philosophical issues and research that shaped education in America; reviews how 
America's schools are currently regulated and structured; and highlights the roles and 
responsibilities of contemporary classroom teachers. Additionally, the course introduces 
students to contemporary issues and trends in American education. 

121 Educational Technology 3 credits 

This first-year level course introduces students to educational technology. In addition to 
preparing students to select and use equipment and software, this course prepares 
students to effectively use technology as a teaching tool. 

191 Freshman Field credits 

After completing TED 101 First-Year Seminar, students participate in this on-campus 
seminar (last two-thirds of the semester). It introduces students (all majors) to the 
purposes and expectations of the TED's field experience requirements. Faculty and 
guest presenters, including district administrators and classroom teachers, help students 
prepare to effectively participate in required field experiences. Students must "shadow" a 
teacher for an entire day. 



260 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



231 Learning 3 credits 

This sophomore-level course introduces students to contemporary learning theories, 
including those that explain atypical learning styles. In doing so, the course prepares 
students to use learning theories to explain and critique teaching and testing methods 
used with students at various stages of development. During this course students learn 
about and how to administer and use the results of formal standardized tests. 

TED 231 and 241 should be taken during the same semester 

241 Development 3 credits 

This sophomore-level course introduces students (all majors) to factors that interact to 
govern how children and adolescents grow and develop. The processes and stages of 
growth and development are explored, including those that explain atypical growth and 
development experienced by exceptional children and adolescents. 

TED 241 and TED 231 should be taken during the same semester 

251 Curriculum 3 credits 

This sophomore-level course introduces students (all majors) to the foundations, 
structures, and expectations of curriculum (including individualized education programs). 
In addition to explaining the purposes of curriculum, how curriculum is regulated, and 
how it is structured and stated, the course prepares students to develop and use 
curriculum to develop units and lesson plans. During this course students learn about 
and how to develop, administer, and use the results of informal tests. 

Prerequisites: TED 231, TED 241 

Note: TED 251 and TED 261 should be taken during the same semester 

261 Teaching 3 credits 

This sophomore-level course prepares students (all majors) to implement units and 
lessons that follow models for group-oriented direct instruction, in content areas. During 
this course, students prepare and present (to their classmates) a series of demonstration 
lessons. In addition, students learn how to establish classrooms and to conduct the 
many non-instructional duties that must be performed by classroom teachers. Materials 
and resources used by teachers are highlighted. 

Prerequisites: TED 2 31, TED 241 

Note: TED 251 and TED 261 should be taken during the same semester 

271 Classroom Management 2 credits 

This course introduces students (all majors) to the basic roles and responsibilities of 
classroom teachers as they relate to managing classrooms and behaviors. Students 
explore the challenges they are likely to face as classroom teachers, including those 
presented by students with disabilities, and prepare to understand and use a series of 
theory and research-based routines and techniques to manage students' behaviors 
across levels and settings. 

292 Sophomore Field I credits 

This course introduces students (all majors) to the basic roles and responsibilities of 
classroom teachers as they relate to managing classrooms and behaviors. Students 
explore the challenges they are likely to face as classroom teachers, including those 
presented by students with disabilities, and prepare to understand and use a series of 
theory and research-based routines and techniques to manage students' behaviors 
across levels and settings. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 26 1 



293 Sophomore Field II credits 

During the spring semester, sophomores are expected to spend approximately one half- 
day per week observing veteran classroom teachers and students in classroom 
situations. While participating in the experience, students must complete a series of 
projects. 

Jote: Only students formally admitted to the TED may take the following 300 and 400 level courses. 

322 Assistive Technology 2 credits 

This course prepares SPED majors to identify and use adapted equipment and assistive 
devices in the classroom with students, including those which require computer 
assistance. 

342 Characteristics MPH 3 credits 
This junior-level course prepares students to identify and explain the characteristics of 
students with profound to moderate mental and physical disabilities. 

Prerequisite: TED 231 

343 Autism 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares students to identify and explain the characteristics of 
students with Pervasive Developmental disorders, specifically autism. Theories and 
research related to possible causes and current educational treatments are explored. 

Prerequisite: TED 241 

352 Curriculum in Early Childhood Education 3 credits 

This junior-level course prepares students to identify and explain the curriculum and 
setting demands of early childhood education (i.e., nursery schools, preschools, and 
kindergartens). National, state, and local standards are highlighted. 

Prerequisites: TED 231, TED 241, TED 251, TED 261 

353 Curriculum in Elementary Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares students to identify and explain the curriculum and 
setting demands of elementary education (i.e., K-6). National, state, and local standards 
are highlighted. 

Prerequisite: TED 251 

354 Curriculum in Special Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares students to identify and explain the purposes, 
curriculum, and demands which control special education, including those identified as 
life skills programs, academic support programs, and emotional support programs. 
National, state, and local standards are reviewed, including those suggested by the 
Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). 

Prerequisite: TED 251 

355 Curriculum in Middle Level Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares MLED students to identify and explain the general 
curriculum and setting demands of middle level education (i.e., middle schools and junior 
high schools). In addition, MLED students thoroughly explore the curricula their content 
area certifications will allow them to teach. National, state, and local standards are 
highlighted, including those suggested by the National Middle Schools Association. 

Prerequisite: TED 251 



262 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



356 Curriculum in Secondary Education 1 credit 

This junior-level course prepares SECED students to identify and explain the general 
curriculum and setting demands of secondary level education (i.e., high schools). In 
addition, MLED students thoroughly explore the curricula their content area certifications 
will allow them to teach. National, state, and local standards are highlighted. 

Prerequisite: TED 251 

360 Children's Literature 2 credits 

Curriculum topics in elementary literature are explored. Uses of children's literature and 
storytelling techniques are developed. Additionally, students prepare to use a series of 
specialized methods and materials designed to teach students with atypical learning 
styles, including those with disabilities. 

362 Methods in Early Childhood Education 3 credits 
This junior-level course prepares ECED students to identify/develop and use a variety of 
materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to early childhood 
education (i.e., nursery schools, preschools, and kindergartens, including those which 
include students with disabilities). During the course, students are required to develop 
and present demonstration lessons to their classmates, including lessons which 
integrate content and technology. 

Prerequisites: TED 231, TED 241, TED 261, TED 352 

363 Methods in Elementary Education 2 credits 
This junior-level course prepares ELED students to identify/develop and use a variety of 
materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to elementary 
education (i.e., first through sixth grades, including those which include students with 
disabilities). During the course, students are required to develop and present 
demonstration lessons to their classmates, including lessons which integrate content and 
technology. 

Prerequisites: TED 251, TED 353 

364 Methods in Special Education Skills 3 credits 
This junior-level course prepares SPED students to identify/develop and use a variety of 
materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to life skills programs 
(i.e., primary, elementary, intermediate, and secondary programs for students with 
profound to moderate mental and physical disabilities). During the course, students are 
required to develop and present demonstration lessons to their classmates, including 
lessons which integrate content and technology. 

Prerequisites: TED 261, TED 354 

365 Methods in Special Education/Learning Support 3 credits 
This junior-level course prepares SPED students to identify/develop and use a variety of 
materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to learning and 
emotional support programs (i.e., primary, elementary, intermediate, and secondary 
programs for students with learning and emotional disabilities in academic areas). During 
the course, students are required to develop and present demonstration lessons to their 
classmates, including lessons which integrate content and technology. 

Prerequisite: TED 261 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 263 



366 Methods in Middle Level Education 2 credits 
This junior-level course prepares MLED students to identify/develop and use a variety of 
materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to middle level 
education (i.e., middle schools and junior high schools, including those which include 
students with disabilities). During the course, students are required to develop and 
present demonstration lessons to their classmates, including lessons which integrate 
content and technology. 

Prerequisite: TED 261 

367 Methods in Secondary Education 2 credits 
This junior-level course prepares SECED students to identify/develop and use a variety 
of materials and methods (including educational technology) unique to secondary 
education (i.e., high schools, including those which include students with disabilities). 
During the course, students are required to develop and present demonstration lessons 
to their classmates, including lessons which integrate content and technology. 

Prerequisite: TED 261 

373 Classroom Management in Elementary Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course identifies the classroom management challenges unique to 
elementary classrooms. It identifies a series of routines and techniques, which might be 
used by teachers in elementary classrooms. 

Prerequisite: TED 271 

374 Classroom Management in Special Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course identifies the classroom management challenges unique to 
learning support classrooms. It identifies a series of routines and techniques, which 
might be used by teachers in elementary classrooms. This junior-level course identifies a 
series of routines and techniques, which might be used by teachers in life skills support 
programs. 

Prerequisite: TED 271 

375 Classroom Management in Emotional Support 1 credit 
This junior-level course identifies the classroom management challenges unique to 
special education programs. It identifies a series of routines and techniques, which might 
be used by teachers in programs that serve students with severe behavior problems, 
including those in learning support and emotional support programs. The role of the 
consultant/support teacher is identified. 

Prerequisite: TED 271 

376 Classroom Management in Middle Level Education 1 credit 
This junior-level course identifies the classroom management challenges unique to 
middle level classrooms. It identifies a series of routines and techniques, which might be 
used by teachers in middle level classrooms. 

Prerequisite: TED 271 



264 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



377 Classroom Management in Secondary Education 1 credit 

This junior-level course identifies the classroom management challenges unique to 
secondary classrooms. It identifies a series of routines and techniques, which might be 
used by teachers in high school classrooms. 

Prerequisite: TED 271 

381 Reading Methods I 3 credits 
This course prepares students (ECED, ELED, and SPED) to understand the 
expectations of a developmental reading curriculum and to use methods and materials to 
teach groups of students to develop reading skills. During the course, students are 
required to develop and present demonstration lessons to their classmates. Topics 
include principles and goals of reading, emergent literacy, and phonemic awareness. 

Prerequisite: TED 251 

382 Reading Methods II 3 credits 
This course prepares students (ECED, ELED, and SPED) to adapt and enhance 
methods and materials to teach reading skills to allow groups and/or individuals multiple 
pathways to learning. Additionally, students prepare to use a series of specialized 
methods and materials designed to teach students with atypical learning styles, including 
those with disabilities. During the course, students are required to tutor a student in 
reading. Topics include word recognition, prior knowledge and vocabulary. 

Prerequisite: TED 381 

383 Reading Methods III 3 credits 
This course provides pre-service teachers (ECED, ELED, and SPED) with an 
opportunity to work intensely under the direction of veteran reading teachers in a tutoring 
setting. During the internship, students plan and implement individualized 
teaching/learning activities. Topics include assessment, comprehension, and 
instructional strategies. 

Prerequisites: TED 381, TED 382 

384 Math Methods I 3 credits 
This course prepares students (ECED, ELED, MLED, and SPED) to understand the 
expectations of developmental elementary math curriculum and to use the methods and 
materials commonly used to teach children to develop math competencies. During the 
course, students are required to develop and present demonstration lessons to their 
classmates and to tutor a student in mathematics. 

Prerequisite: TED 261 

385 Math Methods II 3 credits 
This course prepares students (ECED, ELED, MLED, and SPED) to adapt and enhance 
methods and materials to teach mathematics to allow groups and/or individuals multiple 
pathways to learning. Additionally, students prepare to use a series of specialized 
methods and materials designed to teach students with atypical learning styles, including 
those with disabilities. During the course, students are required to tutor a student in 
mathematics. 

Prerequisite: TED 261 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 265 



386 Art Methods 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares ECED and ELED students to use visual arts to teach 
content skills. During the course, students are required to develop and present 
demonstration lessons to their classmates. 

Prerequisites: TED 261, TED 352 

387 Music Methods 1 credit 
This junior-level course prepares ECED and ELED students to use the music and drama 
to teach content skills. During the course, students are required to develop and present 
demonstration lessons to their classmates. 

Prerequisites: TED 261, TED 352 

388 Language Arts Methods 3 credits 
Prepares students to provide instruction for elementary students in the language arts. 
The primary focus is to familiarize students with state standards, current trends, 
curriculum, methods, materials, and assessment measures used to implement effective 
teaching and learning. Emphasis is given to the teaching of handwriting, the writing 
process, composition and grammar, spelling, listening skills, and speaking skills. During 
this course, students prepare to use a series of specialized methods and materials 
designed to teach students with a typical learning styles, including those with disabilities. 

389 Science Methods 3 credits 
Prepares students to provide instruction for elementary students in science. The primary 
focus is to familiarize students with state standards, current trends, curriculum, methods, 
materials, and assessment measures used to implement effective teaching and learning. 
During this course, students prepare to use a series of specialized methods and 
materials designed to teach students with atypical learning styles, including those with 
disabilities. 

390 Social Studies Methods 2 credits 
Prepares students to provide instruction for elementary students in social studies. The 
primary focus is to familiarize students with state standards, current trends, curriculum, 
methods, materials, and assessment measures used to implement effective teaching 
and learning. During this course, students prepare to use a series of specialized 
methods and materials designed to teach students with atypical learning styles, including 
those with disabilities. 

391 Health Methods 2 credits 
Prepares students to provide instruction for elementary students in health and physical 
education. The primary focus is to familiarize students with state standards, current 
trends, curriculum, methods, materials, and assessment measures used to implement 
effective teaching and learning. During this course, students will be given the opportunity 
to become certified in various areas (e.g., CPR, etc.). Additionally, students prepare to 
use a series of specialized methods and materials designed to teach students with 
atypical learning styles, including those with disabilities. 



266 Bachelor's Degree Programs 



394 Junior Field credits 
During the semester they are not enrolled in Junior Practicum (TD 395), juniors are 
expected to spend approximately one half-day per week assisting veteran classroom 
teachers and students in classroom situations, paying special attention to classroom 
management issues. While participating in the experience, students must complete a 
series of projects. 

395 Junior Practicum 1 credit 
This junior-level field experience provides students (all majors) with a structured 
opportunity to function as teachers. Students spend approximately one day each week 
for an entire semester serving as teachers-in-training in selected community classrooms. 
During the practicum, students must plan, implement, and assess a unit of instruction 
and a series of related lessons with actual students. Their work is supervised and 
critiqued by a master teacher and a university supervisor. 

401 Senior Seminar credits 

This semester-long seminar prepares students (all majors) to participate in the national 
teachers examination and other high stakes assessments used in teacher certification. It 
also helps students identify and negotiate the processes and procedures they must 
complete to become certified in Pennsylvania and in other states. The seminar prepares 
students to identify open teaching positions, prepare applications and presentation 
portfolios, interview for teaching positions, and plan and present demonstration lessons. 

443 Parent Conferencing 1 credit 

This senior-level course prepares students (all majors) to plan and conduct parent 
conferences and to participate in meetings, such as those conducted by planning teams 
for lEPs. It emphasizes ways to develop partnerships and cooperation with parents and 
families. Students prepare to develop written educational reports. 

445 Independent Study Variable credits 

This course provides students with the opportunity to work independently with the TED 
faculty to explore specific topics in education. 

480 Special Topics Variable credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced with pre-registration 
information. 

496 Senior Field credits 
During the semester they are not enrolled in Student Teaching (TED 497), seniors are 
expected to independently propose and then complete a series of activities. The 
activities might be completed in specially selected community classrooms or in related 
settings (e.g., a group home, a tutorial setting, a business or industry, etc.). Students 
majoring in SECED/Biology or SECED/CHE must complete their senior field on campus 
assisting professors in lab classes. 

497 Student Teaching 12 credits 
The culminating activity of the university's TED places students (all majors) in classroom 
situations where they complete their development as teachers by demonstrating their 
abilities to fully function as classroom teachers. TED students spend the first half of the 
student-teaching semester in one setting and the second half in another. In each 
placement, student teachers work under the guidance and supervision of master 
teachers and university supervisors. 



Bachelor's Degree Programs 267 



Other Academic Majors 



Health Science Major 

College of Health Sciences 
Degree BS, Health Science 

Occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology offer five-year, entry- 
level masters' programs. Students completing these curricula will receive the bachelor of 
science degree in health science concurrently with the professional master's degree. This 
degree is not awarded independent of the professional master's. Students who do not 
complete the requirements for an entry-level master's may be eligible for the professional 
studies bachelor of science degree. 



Interdisciplinary Studies Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Student-designed Major 
Degree BA or BS, Interdisciplinary Studies 
For information contact John J. Curtis, DMA 

This degree is available to students who have an interest in designing their own major 
program of study under the mentorship of an assigned faculty advisor. Courses can be 
selected across program lines and among several cooperating higher educational institutions. 
Independent study opportunities can be designed between students and interested faculty; 
guided internships can also be arranged. Each student must develop a major specialization (at 
least 30 credits of upper-level courses) and a minor specialization (at least 15 credits). These 
specializations may include courses from a variety of traditional programs and from any of the 
cooperating institutions. The specific designation for each specialization will be mutually 
determined by the student and the department chair. 



Interdisciplinary Studies BA or BS Degree 

Sequence of Required Courses 



First Year 








First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester Total Credits 15 


Core 




3 


Core 3 


Core 




3 


Core 3 


Core 




3 


Core 3 


Core 




3 


Core 3 


Foreign Language I 


3 


Foreign Language II 3 






Sophomore Year 



First Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Second Semester 


Total Credits 15 


Core 


3 


Core 


3 


Core 


3 


Core 


3 


Core 


3 


Core 


3 


MAJOR Specialization 


6 


MAJOR Specialization 


6 



268 Other Academic Majors 



Junior Year 



First Semester Total Credits 1 5 

MAJOR Specialization 6 

MINOR Specialization 3 

Core 3 

Elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 5 

MAJOR Specialization 6 

MINOR Specialization 3 

Core 3 

Elective 3 



Senior Year 

First Semester Total Credits 15 

MAJOR Specialization 3 

MINOR Specialization 6 

Free elective 6 



Second Semester 
MAJOR Specialization 
MINOR Specialization 
Free elective 
Free elective 



Total Credits 15 
3 
3 
3 
6 



Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Professional Studies Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree BS or BA, Professional Studies 

For information contact James Calderone, EdD 

The professional studies program was created to provide the opportunity for students who 
have previous or university credits in career oriented programs to earn a bachelor's degree 
through additional study at Misericordia University. 

Professional course credits completed in prior study can be combined with additional credits 
and will qualify the candidate for the bachelor's degree. The degree obtained may be a 
bachelor of science or a bachelor of arts, each with a major in professional studies, depending 
on the courses completed. 

Individual programs of study are designed by the student with the assistance of the program 
director. 

At least 30 credits must be earned in upper-level courses. In addition, at least 30 credits must 
be earned at Misericordia University. These two requirements may be satisfied by the same 30 
credits. Completion of the core curriculum is required either directly or by reasonable 
substitute as prescribed by the Registrar in the course of transcript selection. Continuation as 
a professional studies major requires a 2.0 average. 

Total required for graduation 120 credits 



Other Academic Majors 269 



Minors 



Accounting Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Fred Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

The accounting minor provides a strong analytical base for almost any major. With the 
increased concentration in accounting computerized systems, computer science majors wil 
find this minor attractive. 

Course Sequence 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 340 Intermediate Accounting I 3 

ACC 341 Intermediate Accounting II 3 

ACC 342 Intermediate Accounting III 3 

Select two courses from the following: 

ACC 310 Cost Accounting 3 

ACC 311 Managerial Accounting 3 

ACC 345 Advanced Financial Accounting I 3 

ACC 401 Taxes 3 

ACC 402 Taxes II 3 

ACC 410 Auditing 3 
Total 18 credits 

See Accounting Course Descriptions, page 68. 



Addictions Counseling Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
Degree may be taken in support of several degrees 

For information contact Dennis Fisher, M.S.W. 

The addictions counseling certificate program is designed to prepare graduates to work with 
the myriad of problems associated with chemical addictions. Substance abuse and addictions 
are among America's most devastating and pervasive social ills. Addiction respects neither 
age nor socioeconomic status and impacts on individuals, employers, families, and friends as 
well as the interrelationships of our most basic societal institutions. Its effects are also visible 
within many other social problems including crime, delinquency, and family violence. 

A certificate in addictions counseling requires completion of a total of 15 credits in addictions 
coursework. Social work majors who are pursuing the certificate will complete the field 
practicum elective as part of their required coursework for the BSW degree. All other students 
will have the option of taking an additional 3-credit course in addictions in lieu of the field 
practicum. Graduates of the program will find the certificate beneficial in marketing themselves 
to potential employers in settings serving the chemically addicted. Completion of the certificate 
requirements alone, however, does not make one a certified addictions counselor (CAC). 



2 70 Minors 



All courses are CAC-approved for 25 hours of required instruction for certified addictions 
counselors who are seeking re-certification. In addition, courses may be applied toward 
fulfillment of instructional requirements for the initial CAC certification. As of January 1 , 1 997, 
anyone applying for counseling or prevention certification in Pennsylvania must have a 
minimum of a bachelor's degree. Completion of this certificate program does not equate to 
certification. 

Students seeking a certificate must complete an application for admission and notify the 
director of certificate programs by April 1 or November 1 of the semester in which all course 
requirements will be completed. 

Sequence of Required Courses 

Required courses 

ADC 222 Drug Pharmacology 3 

ADC 337 Substance Abuse Treatment Methods 3 

ADC 340 Alcoholism 3 

Select 2 courses 

ADC 333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 

ADC 335 Substance Abuse in Special Populations 3 

ADC 339 Substance Abuse and Criminality 3 

ADC 341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 

Approved Field Practicum 3 

Addictions Counseling Course Descriptions (ADC) 

222 Drug Pharmacology 3 credits 

A comprehensive understanding of drug pharmacology and its effect on the user. The 
course will include examination of such topics as classifications of drugs, synergistic 
effects of drugs on the body, drug tolerance and dependence, and the over-the-counter 
pharmaceutical industry. 

Fall 

333 Substance Abuse in the Adolescent Population 3 credits 

A study of the special problems of the adolescent substance abuser. Correlates that add 
impetus to the progression of the problem will be examined. Emphasis will be on early 
identification and detection as key components in initiating intervention strategies. 

Fall 

335 Substance Abuse in Special Populations 3 credits 

A multi-faceted look at the myriad of special populations affected by substance abuse. 
Emphasis will be on cross-cultural influences and the role they play in contributing to 
substance abuse. 

Prerequisite: ADC/SWK 340 or permission of program director. Spring 

337 Substance Abuse Treatment Methods 3 credits 

An examination and critique of the many treatment resources and methods that have 
been developed during the last twenty years. Discussion will include but not be limited to 
such treatment methods as psychotherapy with individuals and groups, drug therapy, 
family and network therapy, detoxification, and behavioral therapy. 

Prerequisite: ADC/SWK 340 or permission of program director. Spring 

Minors 271 



339 Substance Abuse and Criminality 3 credits 
An examination of the correlation between substance abuse and criminality. This course 
will analyze the theoretical models of the substance abuse/crime relationship and its 
societal implications. Topics to be explored will include drugs and street crime, DUI, 
interdiction strategies, urinalysis testing, and substance abuse and family violence. 

Fall 

340 Alcoholism 3 credits 
An introduction to the diagnosis and treatment of alcoholism. Emphasis is placed on 
contemporary beliefs and attitudes toward alcohol, effects upon the family and 
implications for treatment. 

Fall/Spring 

341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 
Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis, and treatment methods specific to the aged 
substance abuser. Issues examined will include misuse and abuse of prescription drugs, 
behavior and risk factors, factors related to underdiagnosis, and relationship to 
depression and suicide. 

Spring 



Biology Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Cosima Wiese, PhD 

The minor in biology may be pursued by any student with an interest in the natural sciences. 
The 19-20 credit curriculum offers a broad background in the origin, growth, structure, and 
reproduction of living matter in its various forms. 

Minors are focused programs of study, which involve specific clusters of courses around a 
general area of study. They are not associated with any particular degree program and are 
open to all interested students. 

Course Sequence 

BIO 101 General Botany and Biological Principles 4 

BIO 102 Zoology 4 

BIO 251 Comparative Anatomy and Histology 4 

BIO 241 Genetics 4 
Select one course from the following: 

BIO 345 Developmental Biology 3 

BIO 243 General Microbiology 4 

BIO 346 General Physiology 4 

Total 19-20 credits 
Note: Check Course Descriptions for prerequisites. 

See Biology Course Descriptions, page 75. 









2 72 Minors 



Chemistry Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Charles Saladino, PhD 

The Chemistry minor is most often selected by biology majors, but is appropriate for any 
student with an interest in the physical sciences. Majors in business, English or pre-law, for 
example, may find a background in chemistry useful in such specialties as patent law or 
scientific journalism. 

Course Sequence 

CHM 133 Chemical Principles I 4 

CHM 134 Chemical Principles II 4 

CHM 243 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHM 244 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Chemistry Elective 3 or 4 credits 

Total 19-20 credits 

See Chemistry Minor Course Descriptions, page 88. 



Child Welfare Services Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
Degree may be taken in support of several degrees 

For information contact Dennis Fisher, MSW 

The child welfare services certificate program is most directly associated with a major in one of 
the helping professions. However, the certificate can be earned independently of a bachelor's 
degree. 

Child welfare specialists handle the problems of abused, neglected, and abandoned children 
or those whose behavior has brought them to the attention of the courts. This type of work is 
demanding and requires highly trained and dedicated professionals for whom children and 
their families are of paramount importance. 

A certificate in child welfare services involves completion of a total of 15 credits in child 
welfare and related coursework. Social work majors who are pursuing the certificate will 
complete the field practicum elective as part of their required coursework for the BSW degree. 
Note: Completion of this certificate program does not equate to certification. 

Students seeking a certificate must complete an application for admission and notify the 
director of certificate programs by April 1 or November 1 of the semester in which all course 
requirements will be completed. 

Sequence of Required Courses 

SOC 321 The Family 3 

CWS 363 Child Welfare Services 3 

CWS 392 Child Abuse and Neglect 3 

Two additional courses selected from the following: 

PSY 275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 

CWS 355 Sexuality in Childhood and Adolescence 3 

CWS 356 Developing Cultural Competence in Children and Families 3 

CWS 393 Child Welfare Laws 3 

CWS 395 Foster, Residential, and Adoptive Care 3 

Approved field practicum 3 
Total required for graduation 15 credits 



Minors 2 73 



Child Welfare Services Course Descriptions (CDW) 

355 Sexuality in Childhood and Adolescence 3 credits 
Overview of the emerging sexual self from early childhood through adolescence. 
Examination of one's own sexual values and their relationship to acceptance of 
diversified sexual behaviors and lifestyles. 

Fall 

356 Developing Cultural Competence with Children and Families 3 credits 
Examination of issues involved in working with children and families from diverse 
cultural, ethnic, and language groups. Emphasis on awareness and understanding of 
one's own cultural background, values, and beliefs, and their implications for developing 
intercultural effectiveness while working with others. 

Spring 

363 Child Welfare Services 3 credits 

Introduction to the policies and services that comprise the child welfare system in the 
community. Examination of supportive and substitute services, worker roles and 
activities, and service effectiveness. 

Fall 

392 Child Abuse and Neglect 3 credits 
A practice-oriented course for students who intend to work in a protective service role 
and/or in settings that necessitate an understanding of child maltreatment. Abuse and 
neglect causes, legal sanctions for intervention, treatment approaches, case planning, 
and service. 

Fall 

393 Child Welfare Law 3 credits 
Examination of the laws that child welfare workers rely on to promote the rights of 
families and children. State and local laws that provide services to families and children, 
legal resources for offenders, child welfare service provision in specific areas, e.g., 
adoption. 

Prerequisite: CWS 363 or permission of instructor. Spring 

395 Foster, Residential, and Adoptive Care 3 credits 

Assessment, case planning, and the provision of services in foster care, in residential 
facilities and for child adoption. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Alternate years 



Communications Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Richard Crew, PhD 

The communications minor presents students with different media experiences across several 
media platforms as well as methods for the critical evaluation of media products. Students 
have a variety of courses to choose from in print and electronic media. The minor is 



274 Minors 



particularly appropriate for majors in english, business, marketing, education, or sport 
management. However, it is open to any student with an interest in media, journalism, or 
public relations. Business, marketing, or sport management majors may use BUS 107 to 
substitute for the COM 101 requirement; however, COM 101 may not then be chosen as a 
COM elective for the minor. 

Required Courses: 

COM 101 Human Communication 3 

COM 306 Media Criticism 3 

Plus, 12 credits selected from among the other communication's courses. 
A total of 18 credits are required to earn a minor in communications. 
See Communications Course Descriptions, page 97. 



Computer Science Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Patricia Lapczynski, RSM DPS 

In today's electronic world, a background in computer science is a highly marketable asset. 
The computer science minor may supplement a major in any other field, depending on the 
student's interests and career objectives. Business, education, mathematics, and social work 
majors frequently follow the minor in computer science. 

Course Sequence 

CPS 101 Introduction to Programming 3 

CPS 121 Computer Programming 3 

Select two courses from the following: 

CPS 221 Computer Systems 3 

CPS 222 Computer Organization 3 

CPS 231 File Processing 3 

Plus Additional credits in approved upper-division Computer Science courses 6 
Total 18 credits 
See Computer science minor course descriptions, page 101. 

English Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

The English minor is designed for students who enjoy literature and who wish to develop 
further their critical reading, thinking, and writing skills, as a preparation for professional life or 
for personal satisfaction and development. 

Course Sequence 

ENG Core 6 

Choose either 

ENG 203 Advanced Expository Writing or 

ENG 341 Imaginative Writing 3 

ENG 215 Shakespeare 3 

Choose any two 300-level or 400-level Literature courses 6 

Total 18 credits 
See English Minor Course Descriptions, page 107. 



Minors 2 75 



Ethics Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Matthew Swanson, PhD 

As part of the consortial relationship between King's College and Misericordia University, the 
ethics minor is a program offered jointly by both institutions. In addition to courses in 
philosophy and theology, the 18-credit ethics minor contains a significant service-learning 
component. Sixty units (hours) of service-learning approved by the faculty advisor is required 
for completion of the minor. 

Course Sequence 

RLS 106 Theology and Human Experience (at Misericordia) 

Core 260 Christian Ethics (at King's) 

PHL 102 Introduction to Ethics (at Misericordia) 

or 

Core 286 Introduction to Philosophical Ethics (at 

King's) 
Phil/Theo 470 Ethics and Values Seminar (at King's) 
Total 12 credits 
Electives: 6 credits from among the courses listed below. 



King's College: 




Theo 331 


Christian Ethics 


Theo 335 


Christian Environmental Ethics 


Core 282 


Environmental Ethics 


Core 287 


Ethics, Business, and Society 


Core 288 


Bioethics 


Misericordia University: 


PHL 210 


Philosophy of Person 


PHL 223 


Social Ethics 


PHL 270 


Social and Political Philosophy 


PHL 310 


Medical Ethics 


PHL 440 


Economics of Freedom and Justice 


PHL 202 


Environmental Ethics 






See Philosophy Course Descriptions, page 195. 



Gerontology Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
Degree may be taken in support of several degrees 
For information contact Dennis Fisher, MSW 

Gerontology is the study of aging, a normal process in the human lifespan. The rapid 
development and expansion of programs and services for elderly persons in America, and the 
anticipated increase in the number of persons living to old age, have escalated the demand for 
professionals trained to work in the field of aging. 

The gerontology program prepares graduates for positions in agencies and institutions that 
administer health and community-based services for the aged. Career opportunities exist in 



2 76 Minors 






nursing homes, hospitals, senior citizen centers, area agencies on aging, nutrition programs, 
rehabilitation centers, social welfare agencies, and other organizations. The program also 
enhances the knowledge and skills of individuals currently involved in the provision of such 
services. 

The gerontology certificate program is offered to students who are not pursuing a degree at 
Misericordia University. These individuals may take the gerontology course of study by itself, 
or in conjunction with other continuing education courses. 

In addition, the College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences offers a specialization in 
gerontology for students pursuing related courses of study . A minimum of 15 credits is 
necessary to complete requirements for a gerontology certificate, specialization, or minor. 

Students seeking a certificate must complete an application for admission and notify the 
director of certificate programs by April 1 or November 1 of the semester in which all course 
requirements will be completed. 

Sequence of Required Courses Total Credits 15 

GER 241 Introduction to Social Gerontology 3 

GER 375 Aging Policies and Programs 3 

Select three courses from the following: 

GER 277 Adult Development and Aging 3 

GER 341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 

GER 358 Counseling the Older Adult 3 

GER 365 Alzheimers Disease 3 

GER 370 Remotivation Therapy 3 

GER 392 Seminar 3 

GER 410 Adult Protective Services 3 

GER 470 Practicum 3 

GER 413 Gerontology Co-op Education 3 

GER 480 Independent Study 3 

Gerontology Course Descriptions (GER) 

241 Introduction to Social Gerontology 3 credits 

Introduction to the study of aging as just one of many normal life processes in 
contemporary culture. Issues discussed include the biological, psychological, and 
sociological aspects of aging and the implications of those aspects. GER 241 is a 
prerequisite for all other gerontology courses. 

Fall/Spring 

277 Adult Development and Aging 3 credits 

This course provides an overview of adult development from early adulthood through 
death and focuses on both normative changes and individual differences. Topics 
discussed include biological changes, changes in health and health habits, cognitive and 
intellectual changes, sex roles and family roles, work and work roles, development of 
relationships, changes in personality and motive, mental health and psychopathology, 
and death and dying. Developmental theories, models, and research methods will also 
be discussed. 

Prerequisite: PSY 123. Fall/Spring 



Minors 277 



341 Substance Abuse and the Aged 3 credits 

Focuses on the use patterns, diagnosis, and treatment methods specific to the aged 
substance abuser. Issues examined will include misuse and abuse of prescription drugs, 
behavior and risk factors, factors related to underdiagnosis, and relationship to 
depression and suicide. 

Spring 

358 Counseling the Older Adult 1-3 credits 

The effective use of individual and group counseling techniques for older persons with 
emotional or social difficulties in adjusting to the aging process. 

Alternate years 

365 Alzheimers Disease 3 credits 

Exploration of the many facets of Alzheimers Disease and other dementias. 
Assessment, intervention, and psychosocial implications of treatment for patients, 
families, and caregivers. 

Spring 

370 Remotivation Therapy 3 credits 

Development of a group therapy approach applicable to varied populations including 
children, young adult, aged, and special needs. Emphasis on learning and practicing 
techniques to motivate and prepare these populations for more advanced group 
therapies 

Fall 

375 Aging Policies and Programs 3 credits 

The historical development and current implementation of social policies for the aging. 
Discussion of policies affecting income, health care, social services, and volunteerism. 

Spring 

392/393Seminar 3 credits each 

In-depth study of a special topic or area of interest. Small group discussion format for 
advanced students. 

(On demand) 

410 Adult Protective Services 3 credits 

Examination of the needs and potentialities of the most vulnerable and frail of the 
nation's elderly population. Study of the philosophy and delivery of protective services for 
the elderly. 

(On demand) 

413 Gerontology Cooperative Education 3 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

(On demand) 



2 78 Minors 



470 Practicum 3 credits 

Work experience in a selected agency, which provides services to the aged. Practicum 
supervised by an agency representative; education directed by faculty. Direct service to 
clients. (On demand) 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. (On demand) 



Health Care Informatics Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Fred Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

The minor in health care informatics provides a strong, generalist foundation in this rapidly 
developing science. This minor is designed to prepare students for entry into the health care 
informatics field and to enhance career advancement opportunities. The course sequence 
emphasizes a strong, basic background in information technology and provides students with 
the requisite skills needed to prepare them to work with health care informatics applications 
such as use of the electronic health record and telehealth. Students who complete the health 
care informatics minor will be prepared to analyze, design and implement technology systems 
within a health care organization. The sequence may also be taken as a certificate. 

Course Sequence 

MIS 110 Introduction to Information Systems 3 

MIS 200 Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation 3 

MIS 432 Database Management 3 

HP 1 10 Introduction to Health Care Informatics 3 

HP 120 Current Issues and Trends in Health Care Informatics 2 

HP 230 Health Care Informatics Internship 1 
Total 15 credits 

Health Care Informatics Course Descriptions (HP) 

110 Introduction to Health Care Informatics 3 credits 

A comprehensive overview of the emerging field of health care informatics. Students will 
examine the impact of informatics on health care delivery systems. The use of 
informatics in health care professions practice, education, research and administration 
will be explored. 

120 Current Issues and Trends in Health Care Informatics Practice 2 credits 

A comprehensive overview of the emerging field of health care informatics. Students will 
examine the impact of informatics on health care delivery systems. The use of 
informatics in health care professions practice, education, research and administration 
will be explored. 

Prerequisite: HP 110, MIS 110 

230 Health Care Informatics Internship 1 credit 

Students work as team members on comprehensive projects with health care technology 
industry advisors and program faculty. Requires course faculty approval. 

Prerequisite: MIS 200, MIS 432, HP 120 
See Management Information Systems Course Descriptions, page 127. 



Minors 2 79 



History Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact David Wright, PhD 

The study of history enables students to gain an understanding of human motivation and 
action, as well as to acquire valuable skills. The history minor may be taken in conjunction with 
any degree program to broaden one's perspective, develop critical judgement, cultivate the 
ability to reason, and foster intellectual growth. 

Course Sequence 

HIS 1 01 C History of Western Civilization I 3 

HIS 102M History of Western Civilization II 3 

HIS 103M United States Survey to 1900 3 

HIS 104G United States Survey Since 1900 3 

Plus 6 credits of Advanced History Electives 
Total 18 credits 
See History Course Descriptions, page 122. 



Management Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

An understanding of management styles and techniques can benefit anyone who will be 
involved in organizational life. Opportunities and advancement in one's chosen field often will 
be enhanced by documented study of the skills required for success. This minor is well suited 
to individuals in any area of endeavor. 

Course Sequence 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 3 

BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 306 Organizational Behavior 3 
Select one course from the following: 

ACC 311 Managerial Accounting 3 

BUS 360 Management of Human Resources 3 

BUS 420 Small Business Management 3 

BUS 415 International Business 3 

Total 18 credits 
See Accounting Course Descriptions, page 68; Business Course Descriptions, page 82. 



Management Information Systems Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Patricia Lapczynski, RSM DPS 

The minor in management information systems provides the individual with a foundation in 
information systems that complements many varied disciplines and opens the door to 
information technology career opportunities. 









280 Minors 



Course Sequence 

MIS 110 Introduction to Information Systems 3 

MIS 200 Systems Analysis, Design, and Implementation 3 

MIS 220 Applied Networking Design 3 

MIS 310 Object Oriented Programming I 3 

MIS 432 Database Management 3 

MIS 491 Information Technology Management 3 
Total 18 credits 
See Management Information Systems Course Descriptions, page 127 



Marketing Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact John Mellon, EdD 

An understanding of marketing can benefit any individual who will be involved in promotion for 
private, public, profit, or not-for-profit organizations. Opportunities in the field of marketing are 
broadening every year, and this minor is well suited to students in any area of interest. 

Course Sequence 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 

BUS 208 Principles of Management 3 

BUS 269 Principles of Marketing 3 

BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 

BUS 340 Advertising and Sales Promotion 3 
Select one course from the following: 

BUS 345 Consumer Behavior 3 

BUS 304 Sales and Sales Management 3 

BUS 401 Channel Strategies >3 

BUS 421 Special Topics in Marketing 3 

BUS 450 Marketing Research 3 

BUS 402 Pricing Strategies 3 

BUS 321 Product and Service Marketing 3 
Total 18 credits 

See Accounting Course Descriptions, page 68; and Business Course Descriptions, page 81. 



Mathematics Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Patrick Touhey, PhD 

The computer revolution and the growing reliance on statistics and quantitative research have 
broadened the application of mathematical principles. The physical sciences, as well as the 
behavioral and social sciences, have need for individuals with experience in mathematics. The 
minor program in mathematics exposes students to both classical and contemporary 
mathematical techniques. 



Minors 281 



Course Sequence 

MTH 115 Basic Statistics 3 

MTH 151 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 3 

MTH 152 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 3 

MTH 225 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

MTH 244 Set Theory and Logic 3 

MTH 242 Differential Equations 3 

MTH 241 Linear Algebra 3 
Total 22 credits 
See Mathematics Course Descriptions, page 135. 

Philosophy Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Matthew Swanson, PhD 

The minor in philosophy offers students the opportunity for intellectual liberation and 
refinement. The 18-credit curriculum explores philosophical problems from a variety of 
standpoints, fosters critical judgement, refines convictions, and promotes the search for truth. 
Students may tailor their minor sequence to their interests. 

Course Sequence 

PHL 100C Introduction to Philosophy 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

PHL Free elective 3 

Total 18 credits 
See Philosophy Course Descriptions, page 195. 

Political Science Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact David Wright, PhD 

The political science minor offers students interested in law, politics, or government a useful 
foundation in these areas. The minor, which may be taken in conjunction with any major, will 
broaden political understanding and enhance the ability to interpret the significance of political 
events and to analyze the dynamics of political processes. 

Course Sequence 

POL 100 American National Government 3 

POL 103 Global Politics 3 

POL 251 Law Seminar I 3 

POL 252 Law Seminar II 3 

POL 405 American Constitutional Law I 3 

POL 406 American Constitutional Law II 3 

POL Independent Study or Elective 3 
Total 21 credits 



282 Minors 









Political Science Course Descriptions (POL) 

100 American National Government 3 credits 

A study of the American political system with emphasis placed on the structure and 
operation of the national government; the constitution; citizenship and democratic 
processes. 

103 Global Politics 3 credits 

This course examines the nature, character and dynamics of global politics. Emphasis is 
given to the political development, institutions, processes and policies, problems and 
prospects of key areas, regions, and nation-states in the contemporary global system. 

251/252Law Seminar l-ll 3 credits each 

Introduction to the legal system and legal profession; the role of lawyers and judges 
in American society; the courts and judicial process; policy making; legal research and 
procedures; the use of law books; legal terms; decision making; litigation; case analysis. 
Correlated field instruction and field experiences are included. Alternate years 

308 Comparative Government 3 credits 

The course will compare the political processes and governmental policies of several 
different countries. The economic and social problems that decision makers confront are 
emphasized. Focus is given to analyzing policy alternatives and the impact of social 
movements on policy making. 

(On demand) 

405/406American Constitutional Law l-ll 3 credits each 

A case method survey of the organic role of the United States Supreme Court in the total 
process of the America constitutional system. Emphasis is on governmental structure 
and relationships, individual freedom, and the Bill of Rights. 

Alternate years 

413 Political Science Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community 

450/451 Internship 3 credits each 

Directed field experiences for advanced students in law offices or law related agencies. 
Weekly conferences coordinate theoretical knowledge with field observation and 
practical experiences. 

Prerequisite: Permission of program director 

480 Independent Study 3-6 credits 

In-depth investigation of a selected topic. 

485 Special Topics 3-6 credits 

Topic may vary from semester to semester and will be announced with 
preregistration information and course hours. 



Minors 283 



Psychology Minor 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Marnie Hiester, PhD 

The psychology minor can be a meaningful adjunct to any major, but is especially pertinent to 
the study and practice of education, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech- 
language pathology, business administration, and social work. Focusing on the origins, 
development, modification, and implications of human behavior, the study of psychology has 
numerous applications to personal and professional life. 
Course Sequence 
Required courses: (6 credits) 

PSY123 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PSY 232 Research Methods 3 

One of the following two courses: 

PSY 301 Cognitive Psychology 4 

PSY 303 Biological Psychology 3 

One of the following four courses: 

PSY 250 Social Psychology 3 

PSY 275 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3 

PSY 290 Psychopathology 3 

PSY 450 Personality 3 

Two PSY electives to total 6 credits (PSY elective = any PSY course not taken as required above): 
PSY 3 

PSY 3 

Total 18-19 credits 
See Psychology Course Descriptions, page 203. 

Religious Studies Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Joseph Curran, PhD 

The religious studies minor presents students with a cohesive and flexible program of study 
designed to: 

1 . Increase students' understanding and appreciation of the varieties of religious 
experience and expression 

2. Address current biblical and theological developments 

3. Correlate the students' pursuit of theological inquiry with their religious development 
and moral responsibility. 

Course Sequence 

RLS 100 Biblical Studies 3 

RLS104 World Religions 3 
RLS 114 Introduction to Christian Thought or Theology of the Church 3 

RLS 106 Theology and Human Experience or 3 

RLS 107G Women and Spirituality 3 

RLS 115 Religion in America or 3 

RLS 116 American Catholicism 3 

Core or free elective 3 
Total 18 credits 



284 Minors 



Religious Studies Course Descriptions (RLS) 

Note: Students are required to take two courses from the 100 level in each category to fulfill 

the religious studies core requirement. 

100C Biblical Studies 3 credits 

Biblical Studies is the study of selected Christian and Hebrew scriptures directed toward 
the development of an awareness of what the biblical authors meant to communicate to 
their contemporaries with special attention paid to literary forms, sociological factors, 
theological insight, and historical settings. Fall/Spring 

104G World Religions 3 credits 

Students will learn about the major religions of the world and become familiar with the 
ways these religions differ from each other in regard to gods, rituals, scriptures, 
founders, the arts, and their concepts of the principal purposes of life. Fall/Spring 

106M Theology and Human Experience 3 credits 

Presents students with the principles of theology and a practical methodology for relating 
the major resources of the Christian faith with human experience. Selected readings, the 
use of case studies and/or actual experience provide the reference point for reflecting 
theologically upon human experience. Fall/Spring 

107G Women and Spirituality 3 credits 

Feminist consciousness and theory will provide the context for this course as it explores 
biblical texts, and the life and writings of medieval women including Hildegard of Bingen, 
Julian of Norwich, and Teresa of Avila. The course will examine the rich and varied 
expressions of spirituality found in the traditions of African and Native American women 
healers, their understanding of art as a sacred process, and their reverence for the body 
and the earth. Fall/Spring 

1 1 3M Theology of the Church 3 credits 

Presents students with the historical, cultural, and theological contexts for understanding 
the nature and mission of Christian ecclesial communities. Special attention will be given 
to the Roman Catholic Church from the Reformation to Vatican II and to the recent 
ecumenical developments. Fall 

1 14C Introduction to Christian Thought 3 credits 

Presents the major developments in Christian thought from the early church and 
medieval periods including the life and writings of dominate figures in each period and 
the debates that surrounded the issues of faith and reason, nature and grace, salvation, 
and scripture. Spring 

115M Religion in America 3 credits 

Examines religious diversity in America with special emphasis given to the principle 
tenets of Protestant, Orthodox, and Catholic Christianity as well as the tenets of 
Judaism, Native American religion, Islam, and other traditions. Fall/Spring 

116M American Catholicism 3 credits 

Explores ways in which Americans and American institutions shaped United States 
Catholic identity and how Catholics contributed, in turn, to the intellectual, political, 
cultural, and social life of the nation. Particular attention will be given to the influence of 
Catholic social teaching on American life and to the theological and cultural pluralism 
which continues to inspire and challenge American Catholic identity. Spring 



Minors 285 



120 Mayan Religion and Culture 3 credits 

Explores the Mesoamerican civilization in its highest form, the civilization of the Maya, 
surveying its history from the Olmec period circa 1000 BCE to the time of the Spanish 
conquest circa 1500 CE. Mayan myth and ritual will be examined as evidenced in 
monumental architecture, sculpture, painting, and literature. Students will learn the 
fundamentals of the Mayan system of writing and of the calendar, with particular 
attention paid to the use of calendrical mythology in the political legitimization of 
Palenque's dynasty. Fall 

Electives 

224 Experience in Christian Ministry 3 credits 

Course enables students to correlate their professional skills and ministerial 
competencies within a service-oriented context. Theological study, field placement, and 
ministerial/professional development are major components of the course. (On demand) 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Qualified advanced students may arrange independent study in areas not covered by 
existing courses. The permission of the involved faculty is required before Independent 
Study may be pursued. (On demand) 

485 Special Topics 1-3 credits 

This offering allows students the opportunity to pursue the investigation of a selected 
topic through research and/or study/travel courses. Topic may vary from semester to 
semester and will be announced with preregistration information and course outline. 

On demand 



Social Studies Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact David Wright, PhD 

The minor in social studies is intended to enrich and broaden the student's understanding of 
the world in which we live. It can be taken in conjunction with any degree program with the 
intent to foster critical judgement, cultivate the ability to reason, and develop an ability to 
understand social scientific methods of analysis. 

Course Sequence 

History Electives 6 

Advanced Political Science Elective 3 

GEO 202 Cultural World Geography 3 

SOC 221 Cultural Minorities 3 

BUS 207 Contemporary Economics 3 
Total 18 credits 



286 Minors 



Theater Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact John J. Curtis, DMA 

The theatre minor is designed for students interested in drama and performance, and for those 
students who would benefit, in an increasingly media-oriented society, from the acquisition of 
technical and performance skills associated with theatre. The minor provides a double focus: 

1 . Development of writing and analytical skills with regard to dramatic literature and 
theatre history 

2. Practical experience with play production, including technical skills, performance, and 
playwriting. 

Course Sequence 

ENG120 Theatre Production 3 

3 semesters for 1 credit each, one of which must be in a technical area 

ENG 205 Beginning Acting 3 

ENG215 Shakespeare 3 

9 credits selected from the following: 

ENG 120 Theatre Production 1-3 

ENG 220 Theatre in Performance 3 

ENG 341 Imaginative Writing 3-6 

ENG 415 Selected Study in Drama/Theatre/Film 3 
Total 18 credits 
See English Course Descriptions, page 107. 



Writing Minor 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

The writing minor is designed to help students become more at ease in a variety of writing 
situations. Students may develop strong writing skills related to their intended careers, or may 
focus on kinds of writing that are of personal interest to them. 



3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3-6 
3 
3 



Course Sequence 




Select 18 credits: 




ENG 103 


Composition 


ENG 105 


The Research Paper 


COM 


Scriptwriting 


207 




ENG 203 


Advanced Expository Writing 


ENG 301 


Teaching Writing 


ENG 325 


Feature and Magazine Writing 


ENG 339 


Technical Writing 


ENG 341 


Imaginative Writing 


ENG 343 


Writing for Media 


ENG 345 


Fiction Writing 


ENG 420 


Senior Seminar (English majors only) or 



Minors 287 



ENG 450 Senior Thesis (English majors only) 3 

ENG 470 Internship 3-6 

Internship may be taken for 3-6 credits and involves practical experience writing for local 
newspapers, public relations offices, and similar organizations. 
Total 18 credits 
See Communications Course Descriptions, page 97; English Course Descriptions, page 107. 






288 Minors 






Other Academic Course Disciplines 
Fine Arts 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Faculty 

John J. Curtis, Professor of Fine Arts, BM New England Conservatory of Music; MM Temple 
University; DMA State University at Stony Brook 

Betty Wallace Porzuczek, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts, BM, MA University of Iowa 

George Sprengelmeyer, Visiting Assistant Professor of Fine Arts; BM, MM The Hartt School, 
University of Hartford; DMA, Peabody Conservatory, John Hopkins University 

Fine Arts Course Descriptions (FA) 

102C Cultural Synthesis in the Ancient World 3 credits 

This course explores ways in which contemporary culture is influenced by the images, 
architecture, music, and theater of the ancient world. Cultural artifacts are examined to 
discover not only their individually distinct style norms and meanings, but also how their 
styles and meaning change as cultures collide, interact, accommodate, and assimilate in 
the ancient world. 

104M Art, Self, and Community in the Modern World 3 credits 

This course explores the development of modern society from its roots in the 16th- 
century Renaissance through the lens of artistic expression. Important works from the 
visual and performing arts will be studied and placed into historical context in order to 
understand both their meaning as individual works of art and their expression of societal 
values and philosophies. 

1 1 7/11 8Applied Music 1 credit each 

Private half-hour weekly lessons in piano, voice, guitar, string instruments, wood wind 
instruments. May be repeated for credit. 

120 Theater Production 1 credit 

Participation in a theatrical production in one or more of the following areas: acting, 
stage management, lighting, set building, house management, stage crew, costumes, 
make-up, and/or publicity. May be repeated for credit. 

Cross registration with ENG 120 

200 Introduction to Acting 3 credits 

Analysis and experience of dramatic literature through performance. Emphasis is placed 
on building a basic performance vocabulary and technique, and developing confidence 
and critical thinking skills. 

Cross registration with ENG 205 

205G The Jazz Age Culture 3 credits 

This course explores jazz styles and performance practices, examines the various 
influences contributing to the development of jazz, and discovers how jazz influenced 
art, music, Broadway, and rock. Considerable attention is given to drawing relationships 
between jazz and the mood and culture of the American people in the early 20th century. 

Prerequisite: FA 102C or 104M 



Other Academic Course Disciplines 289 



206G Voices of Liberation 3 credits 

This course examines ways in which groups develop their identity through the creation of 
distinct style norms in their culture, specifically those found in art, music, theater, and 
dance. It looks at art innovation as essentially counter-cultural in each context (for 
instance, the art of Christians in the context of a Greco-Roman world, the art of women 
in a culture where only men are considered artists, or the art of Buddhists in a 
predominately Hindu society). 

Prerequisite: FA 102C or 104M 

207G World Music 3 credits 

This course explores the music of various non-Western cultures in order to develop an 
understanding of the similarities and differences of musical styles in different 
civilizations. Studies will include the instruments of the cultures and how each culture 
utilizes elements of music such as scales, melodic patterns, harmonies, and rhythm. 

Prerequisite: FA 102C or 104M 

210 Photography 3 credits 

A course in basic photographic skills including manual and automatic exposure, manual 
and auto focus, understanding how the camera's light meter can be misinterpreted and 
other specifics of digital camera technology. The course will also include instruction on 
how to handle compressed as well as RAW camera files. A basic introduction to 
Photoshop will also be covered to allow students to refine, retouch and manipulate the 
digital images. Advanced amateur cameras will be available to share with other students. 

214 Beginning Jazz/Modern Dance 1 credit 
A weekly one and one-half hour class for students with little or no previous dance 
training. Students will be introduced to basic jazz and modern dance techniques. 
Classes consist of warm-up and warm-down exercises, barre and floor positions, 
movements, and combinations. May be repeated for credit. 

215 Advanced Jazz/Modern Dance 1 credit 
A weekly one and one-half hour class for students with some classical dance training. 
Through an individually paced study of jazz and modern dance techniques, students will 
improve their proficiency in physical movement, grace, physical stamina, aesthetic 
expression, and musicality. Classes consist of warm-up and warm-down exercises, barre 
and floor positions, movements, and combinations. May be repeated for credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on an evaluation of the student's dance 
training 

216 Intermediate Ballet 1 credit 
A weekly one and one-half hour class for students with some classical dance training. 
Through an individually paced study of ballet and modern dance techniques, students 
will improve their proficiency in physical movement, grace, physical stamina, aesthetic 
expression, and musicality. Classes consist of warm-up and warm-down exercises, barre 
and floor positions, movements, and combinations. May be repeated for credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on an evaluation of the student's dance 
training 



290 Other Academic Course Disciplines 



217 Beginning Tap Dance 1 credit 

A weekly one hour class open to students with some tap dance background. Students 
will be introduced to tap dance moves and combinations at a basic to intermediate level, 
depending on the ability of the class members. Classes will consist of warm-up and 
warm-down exercises, movements and combinations, and the development of basic 
dance routines. May be repeated for credit. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 

601 Choral Society 1 credit 

Non-audition chorus open to students, faculty, staff, and members of the community. 
Students study and perform representative works of great choral literature from the 16th 
century to the present, culminating in a public performance. Time will be spent on the 
basics of choral singing including vocal technique, diction in English and other 
languages, and basic music-reading skills. Previous musical study is not required and no 
audition is necessary. May be repeated for credit; up to 3 credit hours can be 
accumulated toward graduation. 

604 Chamber Singers 1 credit 
A student-only chorus specializing in the performance of music appropriate for a small 
ensemble, including a cappella vocal chamber music and jazz harmonies. Some travel 
for off-campus performances is likely. May be repeated for credit; up to 3 credit hours 
can be accumulated toward graduation. 

605 Wind Ensemble 1 credit 
A weekly one-hour rehearsal for students who have the ability to play a musical 
instrument. Under the guidance of a director, students rehearse music composed or 
adapted for the combination of instruments available in a given semester, either as a full 
ensemble or in smaller chamber ensembles. Emphasis is on achieving proper rhythm, 
intonation, tone production, and phrasing in order to produce satisfying performances of 
music from varying periods and styles. May be repeated for credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on an evaluation of the student's ability 
to play an instrument 

606 Jazz Band 1 credit 

A weekly one-hour rehearsal for students who have an interest in a big-band style jazz 
band. Under the guidance of a director, students rehearse and perform music in a variety 
of jazz styles appropriate for the available instrumentation. May be repeated for credit. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, based on an evaluation of the student's ability 
to play an instrument. 



Geography 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Geography Course Descriptions (GEO) 

201 Earth Science 3 credits 

A study of earth's physical environment. Astronomy, weather and climate, oceans, rocks, 
minerals, and landforms are explored individually and in relation to one another. 

Fall only 

Other Academic Course Disciplines 29 1 



202 Cultural World Geography 3 credits 

A survey of the earth's people and their relationship to the environment. Europe, Africa, 
the Middle East, Australia, Asia, the area comprising the former Soviet Union, Latin 
America, the United States, and Canada will be studied. 

Spring only 

413 Geography Cooperative Education 3-12 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. 



Health Professions 

College of Health Sciences 

Health Professions Course Descriptions (HP) 

100 Introduction to Health Professions 2 credits 

This course presents an overview of major health professions along with current issues 
and concerns prevalent in health care. Students will be given the opportunity to network 
with peers, faculty, and library staff. Classes are two hours per week and students are 
expected to spend an additional two hours per week reading assigned materials and 
collaborating with classmates and others of alternate disciplines. This collaboration will 
include researching and preparing a required paper on an approved topic. Fall/Spring 

110 Introduction to Health Care Informations 3 credits 

A comprehensive overview of the emerging field of health care informatics. Students will 
examine the impact of informatics on health care delivery systems. The use of 
informatics in health care professions practice, education, research and administration 
will be explored. 

120 Current Issues and Trends in Health Care Informatics Practices 2 credits 

A comprehensive overview of the emerging field of health care informatics. Students will 
examine the impact of informatics on health care delivery systems. The use of 
informatics in health care professions practice, education, research and administration 
will be explored. 

Prerequisite: HP 110, MIS 110 

200 Healthy Lifestyles 3 credits 

This course is designed for any student interested in understanding contemporary issues 
related to wellness. At the completion of this course the student will be able to describe 
the concept of wellness and apply this understanding to everyday life. The content will 
focus on the physical, sexual, intellectual, emotional/psychological, spiritual, 
occupational, and recreational aspects of wellness. Wellness will be viewed across the 
lifespan emphasizing multicultural aspects of individuals and families. Appropriate 
theoretical models will be utilized to enhance understanding of the content presented. 
Course discussions and assignments will explore individual lifestyles highlighting 
behaviors of the individuals that impact on personal and community wellness. 

Prerequisites: None required, but PSY 123 and SOC 110 strongly recommended 



292 Other Academic Course Disciplines 



210 HIV/AIDS 3 credits 

The focus of this interdisciplinary course is the biological and social issues related to 
AIDS prevention, specifically HIV risk reduction and behavioral interventions. The holistic 
approach to health services of individuals, families and communities is emphasized 
throughout, including spiritual, nutritional and alternative health therapies. The social 
impact of AIDS upon the health care system, state, and federal government is included. 

220 American Sign Language 3 credits 

This course is designed to introduce the basic skills of American Sign Language (ASL) to 
enhance communication with the deaf community. Students will develop skills in both 
implementing and interpreting the ASL alphabet, basic signs, vocabulary and 
components of grammar. 

230 Health Care Informatics Internship 1 credit 

Students work as team members on comprehensive projects with health care technology 
industry advisors and program faculty. Requires course faculty approval. 

Prerequisite: MIS 200, MIS 432, HP 120 

241 Fundamentals of Food and Nutrition 3 credits 

This course will focus on a study of the major nutrients found in food including 
characteristics, functions and metabolism. Interrelationships of nutrients; effects of 
inadequate and excessive intake; principles of energy metabolism and a study of energy 
requirements of the individual will be included. 

305 Multi-disciplinary Care for the Pediatric Population 1 credit 

Exploration of the roles and functions of allied health professionals using an 
interdisciplinary approach for development of a comprehensive plan of care for pediatric 
patients. This course is open to all students interested in learning about the "team 
approach" to patient diagnosis, treatment/planning, and care. v 

Prerequisites: Health sciences majors at the junior program level or above, or with 
permission of course instructor. At the discretion of the program. 

310 Multi-disciplinary Care for the Adult Population 1 credit 

Exploration of the roles and functions of allied health professionals using an 
interdisciplinary approach for development of a comprehensive plan of care for adult 
patients. This course is open to all students interested in learning about the "team 
approach" to patient diagnosis, treatment/planning, and care. 

Prerequisites: Health sciences majors at the junior program level or above, or with 
permission of course instructor. At the discretion of the program. 

315 Multi-disciplinary Care for the Older Adult Population 1 credit 

Exploration of the roles and functions of allied health professionals using an 
interdisciplinary approach for development of a comprehensive plan of care for older 
adult patients. This course is open to all students interested in learning about the "team 
approach" to patient diagnosis, treatment/planning, and care. 

Prerequisites: Health sciences majors at the junior program level or above, or with 
permission of course instructor. At the discretion of the program. 



Other Academic Course Disciplines 293 



320 Pharmacology 3 credits 

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the knowledge and 
understanding of essential principles of pharmacology. The course will focus on 
therapeutic classifications; characteristic drug groups; physiologic influences on drug 
effects; principles of therapy; drug interactions; and legal, ethical, and economic issues 
of drug therapy. 

410 Introduction to Health Professions Research (cross ref. NSG 410) 3 credits 
This introductory course is designed to provide health professionals with an overview of 
the quantitative and qualitative research processes and to provide opportunities for 
cultivation of critical inquiry. Students will become consumers of research by evaluating 
published reports and identifying implications for clinical practice. 

Prerequisite: Statistics 

450 Pediatric Assessment 2 credits 

This course is designed to provide students with an intermediate understanding of the 
process of pediatric evaluation in health care practices. This course will focus on the 
process of evaluation including referral sources, identifying appropriate evaluation tools, 
clinical observations, standardized assessments, report writing, evaluation 
accommodations, and the report of assessment results. 

Fall, 4th year, Space is limited. 

480 Special Topics 3 credits 

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced with pre-registration 
information. 



Honors 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Program Director W. Scott Blanchard, PhD 

Honors Course Descriptions (HNR) 

300 Explorations Seminar credits 

This non-credit course is required of all honors students and meets three times each 
semester. Sessions generally explore themes or topics from honors courses. The format 
varies, but may include lectures, debates, discussions, or presentations by faculty, 
students, or guest speakers; discussion among participants is always emphasized. This 
forum provides student/student interaction across classes and majors in addition to 
student/faculty interaction. 

401 Capstone Project 3 credits 

This required, senior-level seminar is a contract course that will result in the creation of 
an interdisciplinary honors project. The seminar will meet several times throughout the 
semester to help students create a research plan, share information, draft material, and 
collaboratively edit and review their ideas. The emphasis of the seminar will be on 
developing a professional project after a process of self-directed research, writing, and 
peer review. In addition, students will assist each other to develop and expand their 
ideas, using the integrative skills they have gained in the honors program. Each 
student's project, will entail either a journal length paper consisting of original research, 
or a visual or performing arts project, or an academically-based, service-learning project, 



294 Other Academic Course Disciplines 



which will demand some original research and will be accompanied by a substantial 
written commentary. Projects and papers will be completed under the direction of the 
instructor of the capstone course and one additional faculty member. In either case, all 
projects must be approved by the honors faculty, presented to the campus community 
and placed (in some fashion) in the university's online honors journal Honorus. 

Prerequisites: Upper-level standing in the honors program and approval of project 
proposal form by the appropriate faculty. All projects must be approved by the honors 
faculty and one appropriate outside reader. In addition, visual and performing arts 
projects must be approved by the chair of the fine arts department; service-learning 
projects must be approved by the director of service-learning. 



Physics 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Department Chair, Lynn Aldrich, EdD 
Faculty 

Lynn K. Aldrich, Associate Professor of Physics, AB Grinnell College; MS, University of Alabama, 
Birmingham; EdD Temple University 

Michael P. Orleski,, Assistant Professor of Physics, BS, MS East Stroudsburg University; MS, 
PhD, Lehigh University 

Physics Course Descriptions (PHY) 

117 Physics Introduction I 4 credits 
This course provides an overview of physics topics in areas of mechanics and heat for 
non-science majors at an introductory level, emphasizing conceptual development and 
qualitative and quantitative (using algebra and trigonometry) applications of these 
concepts to real work physical examples. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: Equivalent of two years of high school algebra "- 

118 Physics Introduction II 4 credits 
This course provides an overview of physics topics in areas of electricity, magnetism, 
waves, sound, light, and modern physics for non-science majors at an introductory level, 
emphasizing conceptual development and qualitative and quantitative (using algebra 
and trigonometry) applications of these concepts to real world physical examples. 
Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHY1 17 or permission of instructor 

131 Physical Science 3 credits 

An introduction to selected areas of the physical sciences of astronomy, chemistry and 
physics. Integrated Lecture/Laboratory: 4 hours. 

141 Introduction to Astronomy 3 credits 

An introduction to selected areas in Astronomy including historical perspectives, current 
theories and knowledge, and experience in astronomical observations. Integrated 
Lecture/Laboratory: 4 hours 

221 General Physics I 4 credits 

Fundamentals of mechanics and heat. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 
Prerequisite: MTH 152 



Other Academic Course Disciplines 295 



222 General Physics II 4 credits 

Fundamentals of light, sound, electromagnetism and an introduction to selected areas of 
modern physics. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. 

Prerequisite: PHY 221 

341 Modern Physics 3 credits 

Physics of the 20th Century, including the Bohr atom, spectra, x-rays, matter waves, 
radioactivity, nuclear energy, relativity, quantum mechanics fundamental particles. 
Lecture: 3 hours. (On demand) 

413 Physics Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. (On demand) 



Sociology 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact Dennis Fisher, MSN 

Course Descriptions (SOC) 

101 Comparative Sociology 3 credits 

Provides a socio-cultural perspective that challenges students to think critically about 
diverse cultural groups. Sociological concepts such as culture, social structures, 
exchange systems, and family systems will be examined as they relate to different 
cultures throughout the world. 

103 Community Service 3 credits 

Practical experience in helping people and the community, understanding human needs 
and assessing potential for human services professions. Lecture combined with four 
hours per week in community service. Course open to all students. 

Corequisite: SOC 101. Fall/Spring 

122 Social Problems 3 credits 

Presents a critical thinking approach to social problem theories and an examination of 
factors associated with social problems in contemporary American society. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.. Spring only 

221 Cultural Minorities 3 credits 

Explores the nature of majority-minority relations as it relates to people of color in 
American society. Majority-minority relationships will be examined from the sociological 
perspective, which identifies majority status as one of dominance and minority status as 
one of subordination. In doing so, students will identify and analyze those historical, 
psycho-social, and socio-structural factors, which have contributed to the making of 
minority groups and to the perpetuation of prejudice and racism. Majority-minority 
relationships in the United States will be illustrated by studying the social experience of 
four selected groups: Black Americans, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, and 
Puerto Rican Americans. 

Prerequisite: SOC 101. Fall/Spring 



296 Other Academic Course Disciplines 



321 The Family 3 credits 

A study of the family as a social institution and social group. A multi-disciplinary 
approach drawing from sociology, anthropology, psychology and economics. Family 
diversity, patterns of organization disorganization and reorganization in contemporary 
America. 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor 

392 Seminar 3 credits each 

393 Analysis of special areas of sociology or anthropology. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (On demand) 

413 Sociology Cooperative Education 3-6 credits 

Academic study combined with work experience in the community. 

480 Independent Study 1-3 credits 

Special investigation of a selected topic. (On demand ) 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 

Addictions Counseling Certificate 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
May be taken in support of several degrees 

See Child Welfare Services Course Descriptions, page 274. 

Child Welfare Services Certificate 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
May be taken in support of several degrees 

See Child Welfare Services Course Descriptions, page 274. 



Diagnostic Medical Sonography Certificate 

College of Health Sciences 

Program Director Sheryl Goss, MS, RT, (R), RDMS, RDCS, RVT 

The diagnostic medical sonography program is an 18-month certificate program divided into 
six sessions, inclusive of didactic, laboratory, and clinical education components. The purpose 
of this program is to prepare students to become highly qualified individuals able to perform 
diagnostic patient services using ultrasound. The program is designed to prepare students to 
perform as competent sonographers in hospitals, outpatient clinics, and physicians' offices. 
This specialized, non-invasive technique, utilizes the generation of high frequency sound 
waves (ultrasound) together with digitized instrumentation to project information on display 
monitors generating diagnostic images of internal organs and other structures to evaluate the 
absence or presence of pathology. The diagnostic medical sonographer provides patient 
services using medical sonographic equipment under the supervision of a physician specialist 
in radiology, gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, vascular surgery, cardiology, or 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 297 



ophthalmology. The sonographer assists the physician in gathering pertinent patient history as 
well as the anatomical, physiological, and pathological sonographic data and images 
necessary to diagnose an increasing variety of conditions and diseases. 

The diagnostic medical sonography program is one that, upon successful completion, provides 
the knowledge and skills to qualify participants as sonographers. Individuals are educated to 
perform examinations in the following areas: obstetrical, gynecological, abdominal, small 
parts, and interventional sonography. Introduction to neonatal sonography and vascular 
sonsography is also included in this program. 

Upon successful completion of the diagnostic medical sonography program, students are 
eligible to sit for a national certification examination, thus enabling them to achieve 
professional status and employment in the field. The program is accredited by the Commission 
on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). 

Diagnostic medical sonography is a natural extension of the medical imaging program. In 
many health care institutions, sonography is part of the radiology department. Any individual 
meeting the required program criteria and with a background and interest conducive to the 
medical field can pursue the field of diagnostic medical sonography. The purpose of the 
sonography program is founded on the value attributed to individual students, the medical 
imaging profession, and continuing education. The goals of the DMS program are as follows: 

1 . Recognize the needs of the patient are first and foremost and possess the knowledge 
and skills to attend those needs, while adhering to the SDMS Code of Ethics. 

2. Interact and communicate with the community, medical staff, and fellow colleagues, in 
a professional and humanistic manner. 

3. Recognize emergency patient conditions and initiate life-saving first aid and basic life 
support procedures. 

4. Apply the knowledge and skills obtained through program education to perform quality 
diagnostic medical sonography. 

5. Using independent judgment, interpret and evaluate the sonographic images for 
diagnostic quality. 

6. Demonstrate concern for staying abreast of new developments in the field, as well as 
further self-development. 

7. Demonstrate critical thinking and/or writing skills. 

8. Apply the knowledge and skills obtained through program education to successfully 
pass the certification examination given by the American Registry of Diagnostic 
Medical Sonographers (ARDMS). 

The target populations that may be compatible with this program include the following: 

1 . Students currently pursuing a BS degree in the existing medical imaging major and 
exhibiting an interest in specializing in diagnostic medical sonography. 

2. Individuals with previous allied health education expressing a desire for a career 
change.* 

3. Individuals interested in seeking a career in the healthcare field. 
Admission Criteria: 

To be considered for entrance into the sonography program, applicants must meet one of the 
following three pathways: 

1 . Graduate of an accredited allied health program (minimum of two years) and 
completion of prerequisites listed in Pathway #3 with a minimum grade of "C" or 

2. Graduate of a bachelor degree program, and completion of prerequisites listed in 
Pathway #3 with a minimum grade of "C" 

or 



298 Certificates Programs/Certifications 






3. Completion of prerequisites at the university or post secondary level with a "C" or 
higher to include the following: 

* Common examples of allied health professions (this list is not comprehensive): 

Radiologic technologist 

Respiratory therapist 

Occupational therapist or assistant 

Physical therapist or assistant 

Registered or licensed practical nurse 

Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II Ethics 

Physics Math or Algebra 

English (Oral or written communication) 

Patient Care Medical Terminology 

Note: Patient Care and Medical Terminology can be taken as co-requisites in the 
first session of the program. 

All courses completed on the post secondary level will be evaluated on an individual 
basis for determination of acceptance. 

4. Standard university admission requirements 

5. Two letters of recommendation 

6. Interview with program faculty. 

Applicants will be evaluated on an individual basis. Tuition is calculated on a per-credit basis. 

Electronic communication among faculty, staff and students occurs frequently throughout the 
program as well as online evaluation methods required within the individual courses. Students 
should have a knowledge of basic computer skills and frequent access to a computer. 

\. 

Special Expenses 

In addition to tuition and fees, expenses for the diagnostic medical sonography may include 
CPR certification and re-certification, health examination fees, immunization fees, malpractice 
liability insurance, and uniforms. 

A fee will be charged to the student's bill for the first fall semester for cost of name tag, spring 
semester for cost of student handbook/clinical education manual and clinical evaluation forms, 
and for the fall semester of the second year for clinical evaluation forms required for last two 
clinical sessions. 

Fees for national certification exams are paid by the student to the respective agency, such as 
American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography just prior to completion of program. 

Course Sequence 

48 credits Class of 2007 and beyond 

Session I (September-December) Total Credits 9 

DMS100 Introduction to Ultrasound 3 

DMS 105 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation 3 

DMS 110 Sonographic Cross Sectional Anatomy 3 

(32 hours of clinical observation during November and December) 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 299 



Session II (January-May) Total Credits 1 1 

DMS115 Abdominal Sonography 3 

DMS 120 Pelvic Sonography 3 

DMS 125 Small Parts Sonography 3 

DMS 130 Clinical Sonography I 2 

(1-2 days per week, January and February) 

(32 hours per week, begins in late February) 

Session III Summer I (8 weeks) clinic throughout all weeks, Total Credits 8 

Didactic begins Week 3 

DMS 135 Obstetrical Sonography I 3 

DMS 145 Fetal and Neonatal Anomalies* 3 

DMS 140 Clinical Sonography II 2 
4 days per week 

Session IV Summer II (6 weeks) Total Credits 5 

DMS 250 Obstetrical Sonography II 3 

DMS 145 Fetal and Neonatal Anomalies see *below 

(contd.) 

DMS 255 Clinical Sonography III 2 
4 days per week 

Session V (September-December) Total Credits 9 

DMS 260 Introduction to Vascular Sonography 3 

DMS 275 Interventional Sonography 1 

DMS 285 Journal and Case Study Review 1 

DMS 290 Clinical Sonography IV 4 
4 days per week 

Session VI (January-March) Total Credits 6 

DMS 295 Comprehensive Registry Review 3 

DMS 300 Clinical Sonography V 2 

4 days per week 

DMS 280 Issues in Sonography 1 

Program total credits 48 

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Course Descriptions (DMS) 

100/700 Introduction to Ultrasound (Lab) 3 credits 

An orientation will be included in this course to review the student handbook, goals of the 
program, curriculum sequence, clinical education guidelines, performance objectives, 
grading policies, and all program policies. This course will focus on introducing the 
student to the field of diagnostic medical sonography. It will include medical terminology 
with application to sonography. Course work will include information concerning the 
history and foundations of clinical medicine pertinent to sonography, basic patient care, 
infection control and universal precautions, emergency conditions, learning methods, 
communication skills, and professionalism. Medical ethics and legal issues affecting the 
patient, student, school and clinical sites will be addressed. 



300 Certificates Programs/Certifications 



105/705Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation (Lab) 3 credits 

This course will familiarize the student with diagnostic ultrasound principles and 
instrumentation. Physical principles will include; sound energy and its characteristics, the 
piezoelectric effect, properties of ultrasound waves, the speed of sound and propagation, 
pulsed Doppler, and color flow Doppler. The construction and operation of various types 
of ultrasound equipment and transducers will be discussed. Course work will include the 
topics of artifacts and adjustable physics parameters, as well as, sonographic units of 
measurement, equations, and display modes. The coursework will be focused on 
information pertaining to the national registry examinations in ultrasound physics and 
vascular physics. 

110 Sonographic Cross-Sectional Anatomy 3 credits 

This course will include knowledge of cross sectional human anatomy as visualized 
using diagnostic ultrasound. The student will become familiar with the ultrasonic 
appearance of disease free organs, tissues and vessels of the human body. Normal and 
abnormal anatomical variants will also be addressed. Coursework will include 
recognition of abnormal pathological findings as diagnosed by ultrasound. Emphasis will 
be placed on teaching the students to identify sonographically normal cross sectional 
anatomy based on echogenicity, location and size relative to adjacent structures. 

1 1 5/71 5Abdominal Sonography (Lab) 3 credits 

This course will focus on applying ultrasound as a diagnostic tool for evaluating the 
abdomen and all related structures. Coursework will include techniques for proper 
identification and representation of the normal and abnormal anatomical structures. 
Emphasis will be placed on the liver, gallbladder and biliary system, pancreas, spleen, 
urinary system, adrenal glands, Gl system, peritoneum and retroperitoneum, male 
pelvis, and non-cardiac chest. Lecture andlaboratory experience will coincide 
appropriately to facilitate a simultaneous understanding of didactic and laboratory 
application. 

1 20/720Pelvic Sonography (Lab) 3 credits 

This course introduces and relates the knowledge of gynecologic anatomy, pathology, 
and diagnostic sonography. This course will focus on applying ultrasound as a diagnostic 
tool for evaluating the pelvis and adjacent structures. The student will become 
accustomed to the sonographic procedures used to properly image the female pelvis. 
Coursework will include demonstrations and discussion on the proper scanning 
techniques, patient preparations, and positioning utilized to obtain optimum diagnostic 
images. Lecture and lab demonstrations will coincide appropriately to facilitate a 
simultaneous understanding of didactic and hands-on experience. 

125 Small Parts Sonography 3 credits 

This course will cover the anatomy, physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology of the 
neck and thyroid, breast, scrotum, extremities, and superficial structures. Coursework 
will familiarize the student with scanning protocols as well as normal and abnormal 
visualization using sonography. Techniques will include methods of applying the highest 
resolution and color flow doppler. Discussion will include pertinent clinical history and 
symptoms. Correlation with clinical laboratory tests and other diagnostic procedures will 
also be covered. 

130 Clinical Sonography I 2 credits 

This course will provide students with an introduction into the hospital/clinical setting 
work experience. Students will utilize skills learned in prior classes of Introduction to 
Ultrasound as well as Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation and Sonographic Cross 
Sectional Anatomy. The student will be required to apply concurrent information obtained 
during didactic coursework. Students will also become exposed to sonograms including 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 30 1 



abdomen, pelvic, and small parts applications. All execution and hands-on experience 
gained by the student will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision of the 
qualified clinical instructor. 

135/7350bstetrical Sonography I (Lab) 3 credit 

This course will familiarize the student with obstetrical imaging as visualized with 
ultrasound. Coursework will include the physiology of pregnancy, embryology, 
spermatogenesis, oogenesis, and the development of the fetus. Fetal development will 
include the three trimesters of pregnancy. Lecture and hands-on demonstrations will 
coincide appropriately to facilitate a simultaneous understanding of didactic and practical 
application. 

140 Clinical Sonography II 2 credits 

This course will provide continued hospital/clinic setting work experience. Students will 
apply knowledge learned concurrently during obstetrical sonography I and fetal and 
neonatal anomalies. Topics will include fetal/maternal findings in the pregnant uterus, 
fetal growth parameters, fetal anatomical survey, and advancement in the application of 
scanning algorithms. Execution of sonographic examinations will be performed under 
direct and indirect supervision. Refinement of equipment skills should occur as well as 
continued application and experience in abdominal, pelvic and small parts scanning. 

145 Fetal and Neonatal Anomalies 3 credits 

This course will introduce the student to fetal abnormalities visualized in the first, second, 
and third trimesters. Emphasis will be placed on identification of the pathological 
processes associated with the clinical history, sonographic appearance, and results of 
other diagnostic procedures. Major fetal and neonatal anomalies will be covered and 
identified as visualized on sonography. This course will also include the normal and 
abnormal anatomy of the neonatal brain and ultrasound imaging techniques. 
Sonography of the newborn will include detailed information on neurosonography, pyloric 
stenosis, neonatal hips, kidneys, and adrenal glands. 

250/750Obstetrical Sonography II (Lab) 3 credits 

This course will focus on advanced uses of obstetrical imaging. Coursework will include 
the fetal biophysical profile, Doppler application, and multiple gestations in pregnancy. 
Advanced study of the fetal heart to include normal anatomy and congenital heart 
disease. The student will become familiar with the role of sonography in chorionic villus 
sampling and amniocentesis. Lecture and demonstrations will coincide appropriately to 
facilitate a simultaneous understanding of didactic and practical application. 

255 Clinical Sonography III 2 credits 

This course will provide continued hospital/clinic setting work experience. Students will 
apply knowledge learned concurrently during obstetrical sonography II, fetal and 
neonatal anomalies, and interventional sonography. The student will continue to gain 
experience in obstetrics focusing on unusual and abnormal case studies. Topics will 
include obstetrical sonograms of multiple gestation, fetal and neonatal anomalies, and 
doppler techniques. The student will refine scanning skills and gain experience in 
visualizing the fetal heart and obtaining appropriate views. The students will also 
become exposed to interventional procedures utilizing ultrasound guidance. Execution of 
sonographic examinations will be performed under direct and indirect supervision. The 
student will strive for continued improvement in previously learned studies. With 
additional work setting experience, the student's comfort level will improve in equipment 
manipulation and patient interaction. 



302 Certificates Programs/Certifications 






260/760lntroduction to Vascular Sonography (Lab) 3 credits 

This course will introduce the student to vascular sonography. It will include the 
hemodynamics, pathology and pathophysiology of the vascular system. The student will 
be introduced to normal and abnormal vasculature and the differentiation between the 
venous and arterial systems. Discussion will include the clinical signs and symptoms and 
the appropriate diagnostic testing and treatment of various vascular diseases. Emphasis 
will be placed on the functional workings and settings associated with vascular 
procedures. 

275 Interventional Sonography 1 credit 

This course will focus on ultrasound-guided special procedures. Emphasis will be placed 
on how and why ultrasound is utilized as guidance during invasive procedures. The 
student will learn techniques in maintaining sterility during the procedure, as well as 
issues regarding the patient consent. Topics will include proper equipment and room set- 
up and clean-up techniques and laboratory requirements. Sonography in the operating 
room will also be addressed. Lecture and hands-on demonstrations will coincide 
appropriately to facilitate a simultaneous understanding of didactic and laboratory 
application. 

280 Issues in Sonography 1 credit 

This course will present the latest information and technology as it pertains to the field of 
sonography. Topics for discussion will include the use of contrast agents, present, new 
and future uses of ultrasound, and quality assurance for ultrasound laboratories. The 
students will have ample time to investigate and research their own specific sonographic 
interests. 

* Fetal and Neonatal Anomalies runs for the entire 14 weeks, encompassing Sessions III 
and IV. Credits assigned to Session III. 

285 Journal and Case Study Review 1 credit 

This course will include readings and reviews of widely known ultrasound publications 
and journals. The student will become familiar with the important use of literature review 
and research. Special case studies will be discussed and presented to the class. Topics 
will include unusual and interesting medical findings as seen with sonography. 

290 Clinical Sonography IV 4 credits 

This course will provide continued hospital/clinic setting work experience. Students will 
apply knowledge learned in prior courses including Introduction to Vascular Sonography, 
Interventional Sonography and journal and case study review courses. The student will 
become familiar with vascular procedures performed in an ultrasound/vascular 
laboratory. Execution of sonographic examinations will be performed under direct and 
indirect supervision. The student will gain experience in ultrasound assisted special 
procedures, as well as operating room techniques. 

295 Sonographic Registry Review 3 credits 

This course will serve as a review of basic knowledge from previous courses in 
sonography. It will provide information pertaining to the national certification 
examinations in the field of sonography. Topics will include physics, patient care, 
equipment and image manipulation, anatomy and pathology. Specialty areas for review 
include abdominal, obstetrics and gynecology. Emphasis will be placed on the 
techniques of test taking with actual experience in mock review tests. 

300 Clinical Sonography V 2 credits 

This course will provide continued hospital/clinic setting work experience. Students will 
apply knowledge learned during all previous courses in sonography. The student will 
continue to gain experience in all aspects of sonography while obtaining additional 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 303 



hands-on experience where needed. Execution of sonographic examinations will be 
performed under indirect supervision. After completion of required clinical hours, the 
student will be 'eligible' for registry status and is strongly encouraged to prepare for the 
national registry examinations after meeting the test prerequisites. 

310 Breast Sonography 2 credits 

Breast sonography requires extensive knowledge in anatomy of the breast, physics of 
ultrasound, proper scanning technique and characteristics of pathology. This course will 
focus upon breast anatomy, correlation to mammography and the intricacy of proper 
scanning techniques. Classifications and types of benign and malignant pathology will be 
discussed in relationship to the expected sonographic characteristics. The course is 
designed for participants who desire an introductory course or as a review for the 
ARDMS, ARRT or American Society of Breast Surgeons breast specialty examination. 



Mental Health Interventions Certificate Program 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information, contact Alicia Nordstrom, PhD 

May be taken in support of several degrees 

The mental health interventions certificate program is most directly associated with a major in 
one of the helping professions. However, the certificate can be earned independently of a 
bachelor's degree. 

Students pursuing service providing careers such as adult or child therapy/counseling, school 
counseling, school psychology, clinical social work, and consulting need a solid foundation in 
the theories and issues involved in the diagnosis and treatment of populations experiencing 
mental health conditions. The sequence of courses in this program will provide students with a 
breadth of knowledge regarding processes of normal and abnormal development as well as 
the biological, psychological, and social theories and intervention techniques applied in 
therapy practice. This certificate program was designed with a child and adult track in order to 
provide students with in-depth learning experiences relevant to their population of interest. 

A certificate in mental health interventions involves completion of a total of 21 credits in 
psychology and social work courses. In many cases, psychology and social work majors who 
are pursuing the certificate may complete these courses as part of their required coursework 
for their major degrees as dictated by their major curriculum. Note: Completion of this 
certificate program does not equate to certification. 

Students seeking a certificate must: (a) complete an application for admission from the 
director of the certificate program and (b) notify the director of the certificate program by April 
1 or November 1 of the semester in which all course requirements will be completed. 

Sequence of Required Courses 

PSY 285 Communication Skills 3 

PSY 305 Psychopharmacology 3 

SWK 370 Remotivation Therapy 3 

Students will select a specialization in the Child Track or Adult Track and complete the four 

required courses for their respective track as follows: 



304 Certificates Programs/Certifications 



Child Track 






PSY 275 
PSY 332 
PSY 455 


Child and Adolescent Psychology 
Child Psychopathology 
Child Interventions 


3 
3 
3 


CWS 356 


Developing Cultural Competence with Children 
and Families 


3 


Adult Track 






PSY 277 
PSY 290 
PSY 452 
SOC 221 


Adult Development and Aging 
Psychopathology 
Counseling and Psychotherapy* 
Cultural Minorities 


3 
3 
3 
3 



*SWK 358 (Counseling the Older Adult, 3 credits) can be substituted for PSY 452 

Total required for certificate completion: 21 credits 
See the course descriptions in psychology (PSY), sociology (SOC), and child welfare services 
(CWS) for detailed descriptions of listed courses. 



Teacher Education Certifications 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Department Co-Chairs Susan R. Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

Elementary Education Early Childhood Education 
Secondary Education Certifications 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Biology 

Department Chair Cosima Wiese, PhD 
Biology Course Descriptions, page 75 
Chemistry 

Department Chair Charles Saladino, PhD 
Chemistry Course Descriptions, page 88 
English 

Department Chair Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 
English Course Descriptions, page 107 
History/Citizenship 

Department Chair David C. Wright, PhD 
History Course Descriptions, page 122 
Mathematics 

Department Chair Patrick Touhey, PhD 
Mathematics Course Descriptions, page 135 
Special Education 

Education course descriptions, page 260 



Certificates Programs/Certifications 305 



Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 

Geriatric Care Manager Professional Certificate 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
For information contact James Siberski, MS 

The geriatric care manager certificate program enables students to gain the knowledge and 
professional skills needed to establish a geriatric care management practice committed to 
assuring the provision of quality care and to maintaining the best possible quality of life for the 
elderly. Participants will learn to professionally assess, coordinate, and monitor the health and 
human services needs of elderly clients and their families, and to understand the impact of the 
aging process on the individual, the family, the community, and the health care delivery 
system. Misericordia University's values of mercy, service, justice and hospitality are 
embedded throughout the curriculum. Graduates of the program will be prepared to provide 
leadership to communities in this currently evolving field of practice. The curriculum assures 
that graduates deliver their professional services in an ethical manner and with respect for 
cultural and other diversities in the aging population. 

A minimum of 15 credits is necessary for the professional certificate and a comprehensive 
certification test must be passed with a grade of 86% or higher before certification is awarded. 
Students seeking a professional certificate in geriatric care management must complete an 
application for admission. The student must have a minimum of a bachelor's degree. 
Completion of Social Gerontology 241 and Alzheimer's Disease 365 or equivalent is required. 
Experience will be evaluated in order to meet prerequisite course work. 

Sequence of required courses Total 15 credits 

GCM 500 Geriatric Care Manager I 3 

GCM 501 Geriatric Care Manager II 3 

Select three courses from the following: 

GCM 505 Anatomy and Physiology of Aging 3 

GCM 510 Dementia 3 

GCM 515 Geriatric Assessment 3 

GCM 520 Ethics of Aging 3 

GCM 590 Geriatric Care Manager Seminar 1-3 



Geriatric Care Manager Course Descriptions (GCM): 

500 Geriatric Care Manager I 3 credits 
This course will cover an introduction to geriatric case management, review standards 
and practice guidelines, cover geriatric assessment, psychopathologic conditions 
common in the elderly, ethics, care planning, communication issues, and other related 
issues. 

501 Geriatric Care Manager II 3 credits 
This course will cover an understanding of the continuum of care, providing for nutrition, 
senior community centers, adult day care, home health organizations, housing options, 
transferring from home to institutional settings, report writing, counseling and other 
related topics. 



306 Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 



505 Anatomy & Physiology of Aging 3 credits 

This online course provides an overview of the basic structure and functions of the 
human body, emphasizing anatomy and physiology. With this foundation, age-related 
characteristics and some dysfunctions associated with the aging process are studied. 
Students will utilize the tools of analysis, synthesis and evaluation to assess body 
functions and age related changes. 

510 Dementia 3 credits 

This course will concentrate on dementia's that afflict the elderly in ever increasing 
numbers, focusing on the magnitude, pathology, progression, treatment and 
interventions of these diseases. Client, family, human service systems, long term care as 
well as personal care issues will be studied in depth. The course will offer opportunities 
for geriatric care managers to gain a pragmatic experience in dealing with dementia 
clients, their families and other care providers. 

515 Geriatric Assessment 3 credits 

This course will cover the numerous assessments available to the geriatric care 
manager. The assessments address ADL's, psychological, sociological, medical and 
spiritual aspects of client served by the geriatric care manager. 

520 Ethics of Aging 3 credits 

This course will address the various aspects of ethics that a geriatric care manager will 
confront in his or her practice. This will include bioethics, business ethics, social ethics 
and philosophy.of a personhood. 

590 Geriatric Care Manager Seminar 1 - 3 credits 

An in-depth course of study of a specific aspect of geriatric care management. This 
would entail small groups of advanced level students. 



Teaching English as a Second Language Certificate 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education 

This twelve-credit graduate program is designed to meet the requirements set by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education's (PDE) Bureau of Teacher Certification and 
Preparation and conforms to national TESOL standards. To enroll in the program, students 
must possess a current and valid Pennsylvania Instructor Level I or II certificate and all 
necessary clearances required by Act 34, 114, 151. 

Courses and experiences in the program are offered in outcome-based and adult-focused 
formats. Successful completion of the program requirements qualify graduates for 
Pennsylvania program specialist certification. For more information on the program contact the 
Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 

The required courses and related experiences will include:: 

ESL 571 Cultural Awareness 3 

ESL 572 Linguistics: Structures of the American Language 3 

ESL 573 Teaching in ESL Programs: Theory and Practice 3 

ESL 574 ESL Support Systems 2 

ESL 610 ESL Field Experience 1 

ESL 615 ESL Culminating Experience 
Total 12 credits 



Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 307 



Prospective participants may request Misericordia University to review courses taken at other 
colleges against the requirements of the program and, upon the approval of Misericordia 
University's Registrar and certifying officer, the transferred courses will be used to determine 
whether and when students will be recommended to PDE. The processes of transfer review 
and approval are governed by Misericordia University's policies. 

Prospective participants who are currently functioning as ESL teachers may request prior 
learning assessment (PLA) credits, a process that requires them to detail whether and how 
they meet the goals of the program and also its component courses and experiences, or at 
least those they choose to challenge. PLA reviews are conducted by the Center for Adult and 
Continuing Education. 

Teaching English as a Second Language Course Descriptions (ESL) 

571 Cultural Awareness 3 credits 
This course is designed to examine the issues of culture and cultural diversity with a 
focus on the differences and similarities of the major ethnic groups to the dominant 
American culture both nationally and locally. This course focuses on the increasing level 
of cultural diversity within the local communities and its impact on the education of 
students in grades K-12. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of communication 
patterns, both written and spoken, of all groups. Students will analyze and research the 
elements of surface and deep culture. In addition, students will evaluate and develop 
effective curricular materials and instructional techniques that will enhance classroom 
learning. 

572 Linguistics: Structures of the American Language 3 credits 
This course introduces participants to the structures of the English language, grammar, 
and pronunciation, including lexical, morphological, syntax, phonological, non-verbal and 
pragmatic components. It highlights factors associated with language development 
relative to ELL students. The course will use several guest lecturers who will present via 
distance learning options. 

573 Teaching in ESL Programs: Theory and Practice 3 credits 
This course focuses on the methods and materials ESL teachers can use with ELLs. 
During this course, participants must plan, implement and assess lessons designed for 
use with ELL students. 

Prerequisite: ESL 571 and 572 

574 ESL Support Systems 2 credits 
This course challenges students to identify resources ESL teachers may access to 
discover suggestions they might implement to improve educational programs for ELLs. 
The course highlights supports for translations, information about effective assessment 
strategies. 

Prerequisite: ESL 573 

610 ESL Field Experience 1 credit 

During this field experience, students will observe in ESL programs and plan, implement, 
and assess instruction for one ELL student. 

Prerequisite: ESL 571, 572, 573, 574 

615 Culminating Experience credits 

This experience allows students to present the results of their programs to interested 
parties, including to prospective students. Completion of all ESL courses 

Prerequisite: Completion of all ESL courses 



308 Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 



Gerontology Certificate 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
May be taken in support of several degrees 

See Gerontology Course Descriptions, page 277. 



Health Care Informatics Certificate 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
See Health Professions Course Descriptions, page 279. 
See MIS Course Descriptions, page 127. 

Post-master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate 

College of Health Science 

See Graduate Nursing Course Descriptions, page 355. 

Post-master's Nursing Education Certificate 

College of Health Science 

See Graduate Nursing Course Descriptions, page 355. 

Post-professional Pediatric Certificate 

College of Health Sciences 

This program is offered by the occupational therapy department. Students and therapists from 
other disciplines, especially physical therapy and speech and language pathology may find 
these courses relevant and are encouraged to apply. 

The program is for occupational and physical therapists at all clinical levels that would like to 
advance their clinical knowledge in pediatric practice. The certificate is a series of four 3-credit 
graduate courses. There is one required course in the beginning of the series and three 
courses that are chosen by each student on an individual basis. The program is offered in a 
flexible format for working professionals, primarily in distance formats with short on campus 
experiences during two weekends. There are also some hands-on clinical courses offered in a 
five-day intensive format. Students can choose the courses that meet their needs both 
clinically and personally. Classes may also be taken individually for continuing education. 

See Course Descriptions, page 363. 

Spanish Language Certificate Program 

College of Arts and Sciences 

For information contact the Center for Adult and Continuing Education 

Program Description 

The Spanish language certificate program is designed for students, adult learners, and 
working professionals who wish to develop proficiency in Spanish to enhance their academic 
and career opportunities. Command of the Spanish language, in combination with another 
academic discipline, enables students to pursue a broad range of professional opportunities in 
the fields of education, business, public and social service, health care, and industry. 
Academic coursework introduces students to the fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish, 



Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 309 



including the review and study of grammar and composition, the development of 
communicative skills through class discussion, oral pronunciation and intensive speaking and 
listening practice, and the study of the history, culture, and literature of the Spanish-speaking 
world. A diverse offering of upper-level courses will provide instruction in specific areas of 
language study that focus on business Spanish, Spanish language media, Spanish for health 
and social services, translation, and Spanish and Spanish American culture and civilization. 

Required Sequence of Courses 

The proposed Spanish language certificate program will require completion of a total of 15 
credits in the study of the Spanish language and culture for students beginning at Intermediate 
Spanish I (SPN 201 ). The required sequence of courses is dependent on the student's 
placement in the appropriate level of language study. All students who enroll in the Spanish 
language certificate program will be evaluated to ensure that they register for courses at their 
level of competence. Students beginning the required coursework at more advanced levels of 
study may fulfill the requirements of the Spanish language certificate program through 
completion of a reduced number of credits. Students who begin the certificate program at 
Intermediate Spanish II (SPN 202) would be required to complete a total of twelve (12) credits 
in the study of Spanish. Students who begin the certificate program above the intermediate 
level (above SPN 202) would be required to complete a total of nine credits in the study of 
Spanish. Once all requirements are satisfied, the successful completion of the Spanish 
language certificate program will be noted on the student's official transcript and at the time of 
graduation. 



Required sequence of courses for students who begin at SPN 201: 

SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 

SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 
Select three courses from the listing of advanced Spanish language courses. 

Required sequence of courses for students who begin at SPN 202: 

SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 

Select three courses from the listing of advanced Spanish language courses. 

Required sequence of courses for students who place above SPN 202 

Select three courses from the listing of advanced Spanish language courses. 

List of Upper-level Spanish courses 
Offered at Misericordia University: 

SPN 301 Advanced Grammar and Readings 

Offered at King's College: 

SPAN 145 Spanish Conversation and Composition I 

SPAN 146 Spanish Conversation and Composition II 

SPAN 331 Advanced Grammar and Phonetics 

SPAN 332 Translation 

SPAN 336 Business Spanish 

SPAN 338 Spanish Language Media 

SPAN 441 Spanish Civilization I 

SPAN 442 Spanish Civilization II 

SPAN 443 Mexican Culture and Civilization 

SPAN 451 Survey of Spanish Literature 

SPAN 453 Survey of Spanish American Literature 



370 Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 






SPAN 491 Selected Topics in Spanish and Spanish Amer. Stud. 3 

Offered at Wilkes University: 

SP 205 Conversation 3 

SP 206 Advanced Grammar, Stylistics, and Composition 3 

SP 208 Culture and Civilization of Spain 3 

SP 209 Latin American Culture and Civilization 3 

SP210 Spanish for Business 3 

SP 21 1 Conversational Spanish for Health & Social Svcs. 3 

SP212 Non-Literary Translation 3 

SP 301 Introduction to Latin American Literature 3 

SP 307 Survey of Spanish Literature I 3 

SP 308 Survey of Spanish Literature II 3 

Cross-Registration 

It is important to note that Misericordia University, King's College, and Wilkes University offer 
their students the opportunity to cross-register for foreign language courses delivered at the 
other member institutions. 

Study Abroad Option 

Students enrolled in the Spanish language certificate program may receive a total of six (6) 
academic credits through study abroad programs offered. 

Spanish Language Course Descriptions (SPN) 

101 Introductory Spanish I 3 credits 

This course is a study of pronunciation, fundamentals of grammar, exercises in 
speaking, understanding, and writing the foreign language. Readings will introduce the 
student to the foreign culture. 

102 Introductory Spanish II 3 credits 
Students will learn essentials of grammar, exercises in speaking, and writing the foreign 
language. Readings will expand the student's knowledge of the foreign culture. 

201 Intermediate Spanish I 3 credits 
Students will review and further study of the fundamentals of the foreign language to 
increase comprehension, speaking, and writing skills. Readings will increase knowledge 
and understanding of the foreign culture. 

202 Intermediate Spanish II 3 credits 
Students will review and further study of the fundamentals of the foreign language to 
increase comprehension, speaking, and writing skills. Readings will increase knowledge 
and understanding of the foreign culture. 

301 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Readings 3 credits 

This course is an in-depth study of the more complex problems of grammar to develop 
precision and good style in writing and speaking. 



Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs 31 1 



Specializations 



Addictions Counseling 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
May be taken in support of several degrees 
See Addictions Course Descriptions, page 271 . 

Child Welfare Services 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

May be taken in support of several degrees 

See Child Welfare Course Descriptions, page 274. 

Gerontology 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
See Gerontology Course Descriptions, page 277. 

Health Care Informatics Health Care Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
See Health Professions Course Descriptions, page 27992. 
See MIS Course Descriptions, page 127. 

Health Care Management Health Care Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

See Business Course Descriptions, page 82. 

See Health Care Management Course Descriptions, page 117. 

Health Care Marketing Health Care Management Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

See Business Course Descriptions, page 82. 

See Health Care Management Course Descriptions, page 117. 

IT Security Information Technology Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
See IT Course Descriptions, page 129. 

Management Information Systems Information Technology Major 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
See MIS Course Descriptions, page 127. 



31 2 Specializations 



Public Relations/Advertising Communications Major 

College of Arts and Sciences 

See Communications Course Descriptions, page 97. 

Pre-dentistry, Pre-medicine, Pre-optometry, Pre-veterinary Medicine 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Department Chair Cosima Wiese, PhD 

For information contact Anthony Serino, PhD 

See Biology Course Descriptions, page 75. 

See Chemistry Course Descriptions, page 8870. 

English, Pre-law 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BA, English 

Department Chair Rebecca Steinberger, PhD 

For information contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 

History, Pre-law 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Degree BA, History 

Department Chair David Wright, PhD 

For information contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 

Philosophy, Pre-law 

College of Arts and Sciences, 

Department Chair Matthew L. Swanson, PhD 

For information contact Brian F. Carso, JD, PhD 



Graduate Programs 

Contacts for Graduate Programs 

For more information on particular aspects of Misericordia University, contact the individuals 
listed below at (570) 674-6400 (toll-free at 866-262-6363) between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm. 
Other university personnel are listed in the directory section of this catalog. 

Academic Affairs Dr. Man King, Vice President of Academic Affairs 

Admissions, Financial Aid Jane Dessoye, Executive Director of Enrollment 

Management 
Admissions Glenn Bozinski, Director of Admissions 

Graduate Registration Thomas O'Neill, Dean, Center of Adult and Continuing 

Services Education 



Program Directors Education Dr. Catherine Kosenak 

ckosenak@misericordia.edu 
Nursing Dr. Brenda Hage 

bhage@misericordia.edu 



Graduate Programs 31 3 



Master of Business Administration 



Dr. Corina Mihai 
cmihai@misericordia.edu 



Registrar 
Student Life 



Occupational Therapy 

Organizational Management 

Physical Therapy 

Speech-language Pathology 

Edward Lahart 

Jean Messaros, RSM, 

Vice President of Student Affairs 

Website 

Graduate e-mail Address 



Financial Aid Information 
Tuition and Fees 2008-2009 



Tuition 






Tuition: Full-time Occupational Therapy, 


$10,995 




Physical Therapy, Speech-language 






Pathology 






General Fee 


$580 




Part-time Tuition 


$525 


Per credit 


Application Fee (to accompany all 


$25 




applications) 






Graduation Fee 


$150 


A graduat 



Matriculation Fee (for each semester 
during which a master's candidate is not 
registered for course work) 
Parking Fines 



$75 



$10 



Dr. Grace Fisher 
gfisher@misericordia.edu 
Dr. Corina Mihai 
cmihai@misericordia.edu 
Dr. Susan P. Barker 
sbarker@misericordia.edu 
Dr. Glen Tellis 
gtellis@misericordia.edu 
elahart@misericordia.edu 

srjean@misericordia.edu 

http://www.misericordia.edu 

graduate@misericordia.edu 



Parking Permit 



$25 



A graduation fee is charged to 
students who have completed their 
degree requirements. The fee helps to 
supplement costs of commencement 
including preparation of the facility, 
graduation announcements, cap and 
gown, diploma, pre-commencement 
luncheon and the post- 
commencement reception. 



Per infraction for vehicles registered 
with the University's Campus Safety 
Department. Unregistered vehicles will 
charged $20 per infraction. Fines for 
illegally parking in handicapped areas 
are $50 per infraction. Failure to move 
a vehicle as instructed during times of 
snow removal will result in a fine of 
$100. 
Annual fee. 



314 Graduate Programs 



Returned Check Fee $15 A fee will be assessed for each check 

not accepted and returned by the 
bank. Two returned checks will cause 
check writing privileges to be 
permanently revoked. 

Student I. D. $20 Replacement of lost, stolen or 

unusable ID 



Thesis Continuation Fee 


$585 




Transcript Fee 


$7 


Per transcript 


Additional Course Specific Fees: 






Occupational Therapy Fee 


$140 




Physical Therapy Fee 


$135 




Speech-language Pathology Fee 


$135 




Liability Insurance 


$50 


For studer 



that require clinical or field 
experiences. 

Financial Assistance Programs 

Definition of Academic Year 

Misericordia University defines its academic year as the period of at least 30 weeks of 
instructional time, which begins on the first day of classes in the fall semester and ends on the 
last day of examinations in the spring semester. 

The office of student financial services staff are available from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm to discuss 
individual problems and advise students in matters regarding financial aid agd student 
accounts. 

Federal Nurse Traineeship Monies 

Federal nurse traineeship monies may be available for full-time graduate students in nursing 
(students registered for nine or more credits per semester). Please check with the chair, 
nursing department. 

Graduate Assistantships 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available on a competitive basis to graduate 

students. The assistantships involve designated institutional or programmatic work 

responsibilities that relate to the student's graduate studies. Graduate assistantships provide 

full or partial payment of tuition and/or stipends. Written requests for assistantships should be 

submitted to the program director, who can provide specific information regarding available 

assistantships. 

Graduate Student Loans 

Through the Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, graduate students enrolled on at least a half- 
time basis may apply for up to $8,500 per year. Repayment of both principal and interest is 
deferred until six months after program completion (or after a student ceases enrollment on at 
least a half-time basis). Through the Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, up to an additional 
$1 2,000 may be borrowed per year. While repayment of the principal is deferred, quarterly 
interest only payments are due while the student is enrolled. 

Alumni discount: one third off up to 6 credits per semester (when no other discounts apply). 



Graduate Programs 31 5 



Veteran 's Benefits 

Misericordia University is approved by the Veteran's Administration for the education and 
training of veterans and welcomes the opportunity to provide graduate education to veterans 
of the armed services. Veterans enrolling at the institution for the first time should notify their 
local Veteran's Administration Office in order to apply for educational benefits. This application 
should be filed six weeks prior to the beginning of the semester. Students must contact the 
registrar's office to initiate the process. 

Admission Requirements 

Matriculation in any graduate program at Misericordia University requires at minimum a 
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. In addition, some graduate 
programs have program-specific admissions requirements, which are noted below. Applicants 
must file a formal request for admission along with three letters of recommendation and the 
results of either the Graduate Records Examination (GRE) or the Miller's Analogy Test (MAT) 
as required by specific programs. A complete application consists of the application form, 
three letters of reference, the application fee, official transcripts of previous academic work to 
be forwarded directly from the institution at which the credits were earned, and the results of 
either the GRE or MAT examination as appropriate. Students for whom English is a second 
language must demonstrate proficiency in written and spoken English. The application and all 
supporting material should be mailed to: 

Center for Adult and Continuing Education Phone (570) 674-6451 
Misericordia University Fax (570) 674-6232 

301 Lake Street, Dallas, PA 18612-1090 
Credentials will be screened by the graduate admissions committee. The applicant will be 
notified in writing of matriculation status within eight weeks of receipt of a completed 
application. 

Tuition Payment Options 

Deferred Payment Plan 

Misericordia University provides an option for students to pay tuition, fees, and other charges 
on a deferred payment plan. The plan permits educational costs to be spread over a period of 
time. The requirements of the plan are as follows: 

1 . A down payment of 20% of the total term/semester charges is required unless other 
arrangements have been made with the office of student financial services. 

2. Deferments are limited to one term/semester; the unpaid balance must be paid before 
final examinations that term/semester. Failure to pay charges in full before final exams 
may result in loss of credit for the term/semester. 

3. At the close of each month, the unpaid balance will be charged a one percent finance 
charge. 

4. Student who fail to meet their deferred payment obligations will be dropped from the 
plan. 

5. Participants in the plan must sign and receive a copy of the deferred payment plan. 

Finance Charge 

It is a university policy that any outstanding balances will be charged a one percent finance 
charge at the close of the second month into the semester and each month thereafter. This 
policy is waived for students who receive tuition benefits, rehabilitation benefits or veterans' 
education benefits. 



31 6 Graduate Programs 



Tuition Reimbursement Payment Plan 

Students who receive tuition benefits from their employer may be eligible to participate in 
Misericordia University's Tuition Reimbursement Payment Plan. Generally, this payment plan 
permits tuition and fees to be paid up to 30 days after grades have been sent to students, 
rather than the time of registration for the course. The requirements of the plan are as follows: 

• only part-time students are eligible; 

• a tuition reimbursement letter from the employer must be on file prior to registration 
and must be updated annually. The letter must state the terms of the benefit; 

• students must keep the original invoice and final grades for employer verification. 
Duplicate invoices and grade sheets will not be issued; 

• it is the responsibility of the student, not the employer, to ensure that payment is made 
within the 30-day period. Students who fail to make payment within the 30-day grace 
period may be removed from the tuition reimbursement payment plan; 

• the 30-day grace period does not apply to graduating students. Tuition and fees must 
be paid prior to graduation; and, 

• students receiving partial tuition benefits must make arrangements to pay the costs not 
covered by the employer at the time of registration. 



Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 

Philosophy 

Graduate education at Misericordia University exists within the frame work of the university's 
mission statement. It is firmly rooted in the mission and academic traditions of the university 
and its founding group, the Sisters of Mercy, stressing the values of justice, mercy, service, 
and hospitality. It emphasizes academic excellence and critical thinking, while preparing 
students for productive careers and continued professional growth. The graduate faculty foster 
a climate conducive to academic growth, intellectual discourse, critical thinking, and decision- 
making. The aims of the graduate programs at Misericordia University are to provide 
comprehensive education in special fields, offer instruction in the methods of independent 
investigation, and foster a spirit of research. 

Active participation, individualized planning, and selection of learning experiences facilitate the 
development of students as persons, members of society, and potential leaders in their 
professions. The graduate programs offered build upon the university's traditional academic 
strengths. 

Graduate Education Goals 

The educational goals of the masters' degree programs are to prepare graduates who: 

1 . reflect the values of mercy, justice, and hospitality in their actions; 

2. provide leadership and service to their communities and professions; 

3. practice responsible ethical decision-making and behavior; 

4. think independently and creatively, using reliable research methods to collect and 
analyze information critically, in the effort to solve problems; 

5. respect and understand cultural differences; 

6. understand global perspectives; 

7. communicate and interact effectively; and, 

8. pursue productive careers and continued professional growth in their disciplines. 



Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 317 



Policies and Procedures 

Graduate Program Advisement 

The director of each graduate program assigns an academic advisor for all students enrolled 
in that program. The advisor maintains a student record and advisement folder used to plan a 
student's program and track progress. However, all official student records are maintained in 
the registrar's office and can be reviewed by students upon 24-hour notice. 

Students register for courses with the help of their assigned academic advisors. The process 
of registering for courses requires the completion of a course registration form or students may 
register online, with permission from their advisor. Students who use the deferred payment 
plan will be billed 20 percent of the tuition prior to the start of classes. Students who utilize 
employer reimbursement programs are required to submit a letter from their employers 
annually prior to registration. 

Graduate Grievance Procedures 

The university provides a uniform method by which students can pursue grievable issues. 

Grievable issues are either complaints about alleged violations of the institution's academic 

policies, including the academic integrity policy, or about unfairness in the application of 

policies. 

In all cases, formal grievances must be filed and resolved within one semester of the 
occurrence of the event being grieved. Summer enrollment period is considered as a 
semester. 

A student who has a grievance must attempt to resolve it by using the following procedures: 

1 . Prior to initiating a formal grievance, the student must attempt to resolve the matter on 
an informal basis by speaking to the person with whom the complaint rests. 

2. If unable to reach a resolution, the student must discuss the matter with the program 
director who supervises the person against whom the complaint is lodged to attempt to 
resolve the matter. 

3. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student proceeds to the chair of the 
department in which the grievance resides. 

4. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student proceeds to the dean of the 
college in which the grievance resides. 

5. If the matter is not resolved at that level, the student proceeds to the office of the Vice 
President of Academic Affairs, where a formal grievance may be filed. 

To initiate the formal grievance process the student informs the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs, in writing, of her/his intent to seek formal redress through the grievance procedure 
indicating the nature of the complaint. 

Within fourteen (14) calendar days of receipt of the written complaint, the Vice President of 
Academic Affairs will convene an academic grievance committee and provide the chair of the 
committee with the student's statement of complaint. The academic grievance committee is 
composed of: the Dean of Adult and Continuing Education; the chair of the graduate council; 
one faculty member who teaches in a graduate program, other than the one in which the 
grievance resides; and one graduate student appointed by the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs. 



31 8 Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 



At least two (2) days in advance of the hearing, the chair of the committee will notify the 
grievant and the individual charged with the complaint of the date, time, and place of the 
hearing; the specification and nature of the complaint; and the composition of the committee. 

The grievance hearing is an internal review and, as such, shall be private. The grievant may 
be assisted by a faculty representative. However, persons external to the university shall be 
excluded. The use of outside counsel is prohibited. 

Both the grievant and the person being grieved have the right to be present when charges and 
evidence are presented to the committee, and to provide evidence in support of their 
respective positions. Committee members may question witnesses to evaluate all relevant 
facts of a given case. Witnesses shall be excluded except for the period of their questioning. 

The report and recommendation of the committee shall be in writing, including the committee's 
rationale for the decision; the report may include any dissenting opinions. Only those 
committee members who have heard all testimony and evidence in a given case may vote on 
the committee's recommendation. 

The committee report and recommendation shall be forwarded to the Vice President of 
Academic Affairs within ten calendar days of the hearing. The Vice President of Academic 
Affairs will make the final determination and formally advise the parties involved in the 
grievance. Penalties for violations of the Misericordia University's Academic Integrity Policy 
range from a warning to dismissal from the university. The university reserves the right, 
depending upon the severity of the conduct, to dismiss a student for a single violation of the 
university's academic integrity policy. In cases where a student previously has been found to 
have violated the university's academic integrity policy, for which he/she received a penalty 
less than dismissal from the university, and the student is subsequently found to have violated 
the policy once again, the Vice President of Academic Affairs may take more severe action for 
the subsequent violation than that previously imposed for the prior violation(s), up to and 
including dismissal from the university. 

Graduate Program Standing 

Any student receiving more than six credits below "B-" or more than three credits below "C" 
will be terminated immediately from the degree program, and may never re-enter the same 
program. One graduate course can be repeated for grade replacement. This may be done one 
time only. The second grade shall stand on the student's transcript. 

A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation. This may occur one time 
only. 

For graduate retention criteria in the entry-level master's programs in occupational therapy, 
physical therapy, and speech-language pathology, refer to the individual program guidelines. 



Graduation Requirements for Graduate Students 

To be eligible for a graduate degree from Misericordia University, students must have a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0 at the time of graduation; must fulfill all program 
requirements, including the professional contribution/scholarly project as required by the 
program; must have paid all tuition and fees. Students must complete an application for the 
graduate degree in a timely manner. 



Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 319 



Application for Graduate Degree 

It is the student's responsibility to keep abreast of progress toward degree completion. An 
application for the graduate degree should be filed with the registrar. Failure to do so in a 
timely manner may delay the date of awarding the diploma. 

Auditing 

With the appropriate program director's approval, any student may register to take a course on 
an audit or non-credit basis provided that standard admission and course prerequisites have 
been met. A student may audit no more than three courses or nine credits. The fee for auditing 
a course is one-half the cost of tuition. Matriculating students must have the permission of 
their advisor before auditing a course. 

Change of Address 

Students enrolled for course work in the graduate program are responsible for reporting any 
change of address and/or other salient information to the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education. Failure to do so may result in failure to receive timely registration, program, grading 
and billing information. 

Graduate Course Withdrawal and Refund Policies 

A student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty within the period stated in the 
university calendar. Withdrawal forms may be obtained from the Center for Adult and 
Continuing Education. A grade of "W" is given for an approved withdrawal. The date on which 
the form is received by the Center for Adult and Continuing Education is considered the official 
date of withdrawal. Refund of tuition and grade assignment is based on the date on which the 
form is received. If a student does not officially withdraw from a class and ceases to attend it, 
a grade of "F " is awarded. If a student withdraws while failing, after the date for withdrawal 
without academic penalty, a grade of "WF" is incurred. 

When a graduate student drops a course or withdraws from a course or the university, official 
notice must be filed with the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. Tuition refunds are 
based on the date the Center for Adult and Continuing Education receives official notice from 
a student indicating his/her desire to withdraw from a course. 

Graduate students who receive federal Title IV funds and who are enrolled at the university 
will be governed by Title IV refund regulations as mandated by the Higher Education 
Amendments of 1992. In the case of withdrawal, tuition and fees will be cancelled on a pro- 
rated basis for the first sixty percent of the length of the period of study. Financial aid must be 
proportionately reduced and restored to the appropriate financial aid fund. The calculation for 
the Title IV refunds will be computed by the office of student financial services. 

All refund percentages are computed from charges to the student, not from the amount paid. 
There are no refunds to students dismissed from the university. Advance registration deposits 
and any other fees are not refundable. 

Directed and Independent Study 

Part-time and full-time graduate students may apply for these contract learning opportunities 
as outlined in the undergraduate section of this catalog with the exception that both require a 
3.0 GPA or above. 



320 Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 



Grading System 

The grade point average is computed by dividing honor points earned by credits attempted 

according to the following scale: 



Grades 




Honor Points Per Credit 


A 








4.0 


A- 








3.7 


B+ 








3.3 


B 








3.0 


B- 








2.7 


C+ 








2.3 


C 








2.0 


C- 








1.7 


F 











WP 








Not calculated 


*WF 











AU 








Not calculated 


W 








Not calculated 


IP (see 


below) 






Not calculated 


1 (see below) 






Not calculated 


S 








Not calculated 


U 








Not calculated 


* Equivalent to 


a failure, 


computed as an 


F 





Incomplete Grades for Graduate Program 

The grade of "I" will be issued only for those courses in which a student has not completed the 
necessary requirements for graduate courses (500 and 600 level courses) because of 
extenuating circumstances. 

Should conditions arise that prohibit the student from completing required course assignments 
by specified due dates, the student must negotiate with the course professor for a grade of 
incomplete ("I"). The student must contact the course professor and file an incomplete contract 
grade form with the professor at least two weeks prior to the date semester grades are due to 
the Registrar. The form is signed by the student and the faculty member and a copy is retained 
by the student. The course professor has the right to determine the length of time for 
completion of the course requirements within the maximum time limits allowed. The grade of 
"I" must be removed within a maximum of one calendar year or the "I" automatically becomes 
an "F." 

Emergencies, which do not allow a two-week notice, may arise. In that event, the student must 
contact the Dean for the Center for Adult and Continuing Education who will, in turn, inform the 
course faculty member involved. 

A grade of "IP" (In Progress) will only be issued for profession contribution, thesis courses, or 
clinical education/fieldwork courses. The "IP" must be removed within a maximum of one 
calendar year or the "IP" automatically becomes an "F." 

Note: A student who will be negotiating a grade of "I" or "IP" must obtain an incomplete 
contract grade form from the Center for Adult and Continuing Education. 



Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 32 1 



Graduate Maintenance of Matriculation/Withdrawals 

Normally, students have no more than five years after the date of matriculation to complete 
graduate degree requirements. Once accepted into a program, students must maintain 
matriculation on a continuing basis until they have completed all requirements. Students who 
do not maintain continuous registration must notify their respective program 
chairs/directors/coordinators in writing of their intent to withdraw from matriculation. The letter 
must state the reasons for the request and the anticipated length of withdrawal from 
matriculation, if known. 

Generally, students who are in good academic standing both in their program and 
institutionally at the time of withdrawal, are granted a period of up to one calendar year from 
the time of withdrawal to return to the institution. In extraordinary circumstances, students may 
request an extension of this time period by petitioning the program chair/director/coordinator 
who will make a recommendation and forward the petition to the Vice President of Academic 
Affairs who will make the final decision. Each request will be evaluated on an individual basis. 
Students should contact the program chair/director/coordinator for specific requirements for 
returning to an academic program. 

This policy does not bind the institution to offer the student's curriculum or program, which 
may have been discontinued or substantially altered during the period in which the student 
was not enrolled. 

When withdrawing from matriculation for more than one semester, graduate students must 
complete the following in order to withdraw without penalty: 

• return books to the library; 

• return parking permit and student ID to the Center for Adult and Continuing Education; 
and, 

• complete a withdrawal form and return it to the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education. 

The date of withdrawal will be determined by the completion of all of the above. That date will 
determine if any refund of tuition is warranted. Cancellation of charges will depend on the date 
that the withdrawal is official (see Refund Policy). 

Students who withdraw after the last day to withdraw without academic penalty will receive a 
withdraw pass (WP) or a withdraw fail (WF). The grade issued is at the discretion of the 
course faculty. A "WF" calculates in the GPA as an "F." 

Graduate Non-Matriculation Status 

Persons who have an undergraduate degree and who are not enrolled in a graduate program 
may take up to six graduate credits without applying for admission. After successful 
completion of six credits, matriculation is required to continue enrollment in program courses. 
However, workshops and seminars sponsored by the graduate programs are open to 
members of the public who may enroll in the workshops and seminars on an audit basis. 

Transfer of Credit 

Applicants may transfer up to six graduate credits, or a maximum of two courses, earned 
previously in other accredited graduate programs provided the courses were completed with a 
grade of "B" or better and are appropriate substitutes for the courses offered in the 
Misericordia program. In special cases where applicants have already earned a graduate 
degree, 12 credits from that degree may be applied toward a Misericordia master's degree, 
provided the course credits are appropriate substitutes. Transfer credits are accepted after 
evaluation by the registrar in consultation with the appropriate program 
chair/director/coordinator. 



322 Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 



Matriculating students who have not already transferred credits may, with program approval, 
take up to six graduate credits off campus from an accredited graduate program. These credits 
may also be transferred to Misericordia University to meet program requirements. However, in 
no case may the number of credits transferred into a graduate program at Misericordia 
University after matriculation exceed six. 

Graduate Accreditation 

The master's degree in education offered by Misericordia University is fully approved by the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education. The master's degree in nursing is fully accredited by 
the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) of the American Association of 
Colleges of Nursing (AACN), 1 Dupont Circle, NW, Washington, DC 20036, (202) 887-6791 . 
The professional master's degree program in occupational therapy is fully accredited by the 
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education, 4720 Montgomery Avenue, 
Bethesda, MD, (301) 652-6611. The professional master's degree program in physical therapy 
is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education, 
American Physical Therapy Association. The master's degree in organizational management 
has accreditation by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education, 1 1 1 North 
Fairfax St., Alexandria, VA 22314-1488, (800) 999-2782. 

The professional master's degree program in speech-language pathology at Misericordia 
University is a candidate for accreditation by the Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) of 
the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 10801 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 
20852, (800) 638-8255. 



Graduate Academics at Misericordia University 323 



Graduate Curricula 

Master of Business Administration 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Degree MBA 

Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 

Program Director Corina Mihai, PhD 

Philosophy 

The MBA program will provide a quality business education that is rooted in the values and 
attitudes of the Religious Sisters of Mercy. The curriculum requirements include courses in 
social science, philosophy and ethics. Emphasis upon the "human side" of management, 
ethics, and leadership that will support the expression of the values and attitudes of the 
Sisters of Mercy is designed into the MBA learning experience. 

Program 

The MBA will address the ethical, moral, and philosophical issues related to management and 
business leadership in a direct and meaningful approach. The program is uniquely designed to 
intertwine a traditional MBA curriculum with "people skills" and will cover "the human side of 
management." The MBA program goals and objectives reflect the accomplishment of fostering 
critical thinking and promoting the ability to create and interpret business data through 
practice-based research. Students who complete the program will be able to carry on a high 
level of intellectual discourse with regard to business and leadership, and achieve an 
enhanced professional expertise in their field. 

Admission Criteria 

Admission requirements for entry of part-time students into the MBA program: 

An undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.79 or higher OR a score in the GMAT, MAT 
or GRE in the 50th percentile or higher. 

A GPA in business functional areas prerequisite courses of 2.99 or higher. 

Requirements for acceptance of full-time students into the five-year BS/MBA program: 

At the end of the junior year, students must have an overall GPA of 2.79 or higher and a GPA 
in business functional areas prerequisite courses of 2.99 or higher. 

Completion and Degree Requirements 

Any student earning grades at the graduate level of more than six credits below B- or more 
than three credits below C will be terminated from the MBA program. 

A student whose graduate level GPA falls below 3.00 will be placed on probation. If a student's 
graduate level GPA falls below 3.00 a second time the student will be terminated from the 
MBA program. 

To be eligible for an MBA, a student must have a 3.00 or better graduate level GPA at the time 
of completing all graduate course work, complete all required course work at both the graduate 
and undergraduate level, and satisfy the experiential learning requirement. 

Maximum Period of Candidacy in Pursuit of MBA 

The MBA candidate must complete all graduate course work and requirements in a window of 
six years. Any courses taken more than six years before meeting all the graduate course work 
and other degree requirements will not count and must be repeated. If a candidate does not 



324 Graduate Curricula 



complete the requirements for the MBA within a six-year window, he or she will be governed 
from that point on by the requirements of the MBA program in place at that six-year 
anniversary date. 

Prerequisites to MBA enrollment: 

Humanities and Social Sciences (credits required): 

Psychology (3) 

Philosophy (6) (including at least three credits of ethics) 

Sociology (3) 

Economics (3) 

Statistics or Management Science (3) 

Speech or Effective Communications for Leaders (3) 

Business Functional Areas: 

Accounting (3) (If pursuing the accounting specialization 12 additional credits of 
accounting are needed. See Accounting Specialization.) 

Marketing (3) 

Human Resources (3) 

Finance (3) 

Information Systems (3) 

Management Principles and Theory (3) 

Technology Competence: 

The passing of a business-specific technology competence examination 

Curriculum 

The MBA program consists of 36 credits of study that can be completed part-time or full-time 
as part of a 5 year BS/MBA course sequence. Students must complete a core curriculum of 24 
credits and a specialization area of 12 credits. 

Core Courses* (24 Credits) 

MBA 500 Organizational Behavior and Development 

MBA 501 Law and the Business Environment 

MBA 503 Marketing Management 

MBA 504 Information Analysis and Interpretation 

MBA 506 Human Resources Management for Leaders 

MBA 507 Accounting and Finance for Business Leaders** 

MBA 508 Information Systems for Management 

MBA 509 Managerial Economics 

* A student having the educational or experiential background that would result in the student 
not benefiting from an MBA common core course may request a substitution of the respective 
course for another MBA elective. The request has to be made in writing to the program 
director and documentation for experiential background is required. 

** Students specializing in accounting will take the Integrative MBA Capstone Experience-MBA 
650 in place of Accounting and Finance for Business Leaders-MBA 507. 



Graduate Curricula 325 



Specializations 

The MBA offers an opportunity for students to specialize in the following areas: management, 
accounting, and human resources. 

Management Specialization (9 credits): 
MBA 610 Organizational Leadership 
MBA 612 Strategic Management 
MBA 650 Integrative MBA Capstone Experience 

Accounting Specialization (9 credits): 
MBA 620 Accounting Theory 
MBA 622 Advanced Auditing 
MBA 624 Advanced Taxation: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates and Trusts 

*lf pursuing the accounting specialization, 12 additional credits of prerequisite 

accounting courses are needed as follows: 

Intermediate Accounting (6) 

Auditing (3) 

Taxation (3) 

(Note: Students specializing in accounting will take the Integrative MBA Capstone 
Experience-MBA 650 in place of Accounting and Finance for Business Leaders-MBA 
507.) 

Human Resources Management (9 credits): 

MBA 552 Regulations of Human Resource Management 
MBA 557 Performance, Compensation, and Reward Systems 
MBA 558 Employee Relations and Services 

(Note: Students specializing in Human Resource Management will take the Integrative 

MBA Capstone Experience - MBA 650 in place of an elective.) 

Electives (3 credits): 

PHL 500 Experimental Phenomenology 

Note: Other electives are available. Contact the Business Graduate Programs Director. 
Experiential Learning: 

An experiential learning placement is required either at the undergraduate or the graduate 
level to earn the MBA. This experience (such as an internship or permanent business-related 
employment) can be credit bearing (graduate or undergraduate) or non-credit bearing. 
Requirements and request forms can be obtained from the business graduate programs 
director. 

MBA Courses Required for Students on the 5 Year BS/MBA Track in the Senior and Fifth Year 

Note, in the first three years of undergraduate study, semesters with overloads or 
summer work may be needed to complete the program in five years. For students with 
a business-related undergraduate major, total credits for the BS/MBA track typically 
ranges between 150 and 153. 



326 Graduate Curricula 



Full-time Distribution 

Fall I Semester Total Credits 6 

(Senior Year) 

MBA 500 Org Behavior & Dev. 3 

MBA 501 Law & Bus Environment 3 



Spring I Semester Total Credits 6 

(Senior Year) 

MBA 503 Marketing Mgmt 3 

MBA 504 Info Analysis & Interpret 3 



Fall II Semester Total Credits 


Spring II Semester Total Credits 


(Fifth Year) 




12 


(Fifth Year) 


12 


MBA 508 


IS for Management 


3 


MBA 650 


Integrative Capstone 3 


MBA 506 


HRM for Leaders 


3 


MBA 612 


Strategic Management 3 


MBA 509 


Managerial Economics 


3 


OR 


OR 


MBA 507 


Acct & Finance 


3 


MBA 624 


Advanced Taxation 


OR 


OR 




MBA 610 


Organizational 3 


MBA 620 


Financial Acct Theory 




OR 
MBA 622 


Leadership OR 
Advanced Auditing 
Graduate Level Elective 3 



Distribution of courses for part-time students will vary depending on the amount of 
credits each individual student takes each semester 

Master of Business Administration Course Descriptions (MBA)* 

*Note: prerequisites for courses are listed only at the graduate level assuming all other 
prerequisites for MBA enrollment are completed. 

500 Organizational Behavior and Development 3 credits 
This course is a systematic study of the organizational behavior and development fields 
that focus on improving productivity, quality, and assisting management in developing 
methods to empower people as well as to design and implement change programs. The 
importance of person-organization fit is emphasized. 

501 Law, Ethics, and the Business Environment 3 credits 
This course covers the legal and regulatory environment in which a business operates 
and with which it must be in compliance. Some of the ethical considerations that should 
be addressed in making business decisions that can balance the benefits and costs for 
all constituencies including society as a whole will also be covered. 

503 Marketing Management 3 credits 

This course covers marketing concepts and issues as applied to industry, nonprofit 
organizations and government agencies. Focus is on the unique attributes of marketing, 
market segmentation principles, target marketing, relationship marketing, promotion 
planning, market research, competitor analysis and marketing strategies. 

504 Information Analysis and Interpretation 3 credits 
This course provides students with frameworks and analytical tools to evaluate the 
economic and strategic implications, including those related to customer service, market 
research, financial management, product innovation, and manufacturing, of information 
analysis and interpretation as well as the pitfalls of making decisions based on the 
incorrect interpretation of data. Issues that are important to all managers are addressed. 



Graduate Curricula 327 



506 Human Resources Management for Leaders 3 credits 
This course examines the role of Human Resource Management (HRM) in the 
leadership of organizations. Topics include strategic HRM, legal environment of HR, 
compensation issues, labor-management relations and the development of a personal 
HR philosophy. 

Prerequisite: MBA 501 or equivalent 

507 Accounting and Finance for Business Leaders 3 credits 

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of corporate annual financial reports, 
making credit and management decisions based upon the analysis of financial 
statements, preparation of operational and cash budgets, preparation of financial 
forecasts, the incorporation of tax implications into decision-making, analysis of sources 
of capital, utilization of capital budgeting techniques, monitoring of cost and budget 
reports, management of working capital, and consideration of ethical implications in 
accounting and finance decisions. 

508 Information Systems for Management 3 credits 
This course is designed to provide students with frameworks and analytical tools to 
understand the economic and strategic implications of Information Technology (IT), 
transformation dynamics, and risks and pitfalls of IT decisions. Information Systems 
issues that are important to all managers are addressed including those related to 
customer service, market research, financial management, product innovation, 
manufacturing, and knowledge management. The potential of IT to change the 
landscape of global competition, increase productivity, change industry structure, make 
markets more efficient, and alter a firm's boundary and competitive position is covered. 

509 Managerial Economics 3 credits 
The managerial economics course focuses on the application of a limited number of 
micro economic concepts that are relevant to business decisions. A limited number of 
economics concepts will be developed based upon their applicability to a range of 
business decisions. Among the concepts developed and applied are: elasticity, cost 
minimization, profit maximization, competition, productivity, marginal analysis, game 
theory, expected valuation, present and future valuations, capital investment modeling, 
demand measurement, modeling and forecasting, short and long run production 
planning (optimal plant sizes). Market structure discussion is presented as introduction 
to and application of Michael Porter's Five Competitive Forces. While some mathematics 
and statistics are used to have access to some of the more powerful and useful 
applications of economic concepts, emphasis is on practical application rather than 
quantitative theory. 

552 Regulation of Human Resource Management 3 credits 

This course is an examination of the legal environment of the workplace and its impact 
on the human resource function. Compliance with state and federal laws and regulations 
will be emphasized. It offers an overview of the statutory scheme regulating employment 
and labor relations, presented primarily through pertinent statutes and their judicial 
interpretation (case law). Topics include, but are not limited to, issues of discrimination in 
the workplace, labor relations, health and safety issues, and employment standards. 
Prerequisite: MBA 506 



328 Graduate Curricula 



557 Performance, Compensation and Reward Systems 3 credits 
This course explores the performance appraisal function and process and its linkage to 
compensation system development, including performance-based pay and benefits (total 
compensation strategies), and to reward systems. 

Prerequisite: MBA 506 

558 Employee Relations and Services 3 credits 
The course examines employee relation issues including management systems and 
procedures, job design, work environment, and growth and development. Additionally, 
students study employee services ranging from employee assistance programs and 
counseling to child and elder care. 

Prerequisite: MBA 506 

610 Organizational Leadership 3 credits 

In this course students examine theories and models of organizational leadership to 
obtain knowledge of the historical and current research in the field. Students diagnose 
and analyze organizational problems and recommend appropriate methods for instituting 
effective organizational change. Students also focus on understanding the principles of 
leadership in order to adopt a personal philosophy of leadership. 
Prerequisite: MBA 506 

612 Strategic Management 3 credits 

This course introduces students to how an organization must in fact deal with all of the 
complexities and constraints of the business environment and how situational factors 
impact strategic decisions. The tools of strategy analysis are used extensively and the 
process of industry and competitive analysis is employed to make decisions and craft 
concrete strategic plans capable of producing organizational effectiveness. This course 
also serves the purpose of integrating much of the knowledge gained in the core 
business curriculum. 
Prerequisite: All MBA core courses 

620 Accounting Theory 3 credits 

This course covers in depth the established conceptual frameworks for financial 
reporting and the process by which generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), 
both in the United States and internationally, become required standards from the 
investigation of emerging issues to final passage by an authoritative body. Also, GAAP 
that have been adopted in the two years preceding the date of the course offering and 
the current status of new GAAP in the process of being investigated by authoritative 
bodies will be covered. 

622 Advanced Auditing 3 credits 

This course is designed to build on the foundation in auditing standards and practice that 
is established in undergraduate auditing courses. 

624 Advanced Taxation: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates and Trusts 3 credits 

This course covers the analysis and preparation of federal corporate, partnership, and 
fiduciary tax returns. Tax consequences of the formation, operation, and liquidation of 
the various forms of a corporation are also covered in depth. 

650 Integrative MBA Capstone Experience 3 credits 

This experience is designed to integrate the knowledge and competencies covered in 
the MBA core and the Management Specialization courses in addressing authentic 
business problems and challenges. 
Prerequisite: All MBA core courses 



Graduate Curricula 329 



PHL 500 Experimental Phenomenology 3 credits 

Participants in this course will study the phenomenological method as introduced and 
practiced by Edmund Husserl, and as taken up by Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau- 
Ponty and other major contributors to the phenomenological tradition. In addition to 
studying the theory behind phenomenology, students in this course will also do 
phenomenology in a laboratory/workshop environment. In this way, participants will 
come to a better understanding of how they see the world, learn to adopt practices that 
will challenge their own preconceptions of reality, knowledge and human interactions (as 
well as the preconceptions of others), and thus enable them to bring a creativity of 
vision and flexibility of approach to management. 



Education 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 

Department Co-Chair, Susan Tomascik, PhD and Molly Vitale, PhD 

Director of Graduation Education Programs Catherine J. Kosenak, BA, MA, MS Wilkes 

University; PhD University of Pennsylvania 

Faculty 

Stephen Broskoske, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misericordia; MS Wilkes 
University, EdD Lehigh University 

Joan L. Krause, Associate Professor Emeritus of Education, BS College Misericordia; MS 
Marywood College; MS University of Scranton 

Patricia Marie McCann, RSM, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misericordia; MS 
University of Scranton; EdD Lehigh University 

Joseph P. Rogan, Professor of Education, BA Kutztown University; MA Marywood College; EdD 
Lehigh University 

Susan R. Tomascik, Associate Professor of Education, BA Wilkes University; MS College 
Misericordia; PhD Marywood University 

Molly Vitale, Associate Professor of Education, BS College Misericordia; MA, PhD The 
Pennsylvania State University 

Philosophy 

The graduate education program wants to attract experienced and dedicated classroom 
teachers who wish to become educational leaders. While it is expected that graduates of the 
graduate education program will be highly valued by their school districts and communities, 
the program is not designed to help classroom teachers become school administrators or to 
prepare teachers for roles outside their classrooms. The program respects and values 
classroom teachers; through it, we hope to empower these valued professionals and enable 
them to take the lead in making important educational decisions. 

National reports indicate that our society wants classroom teachers to become more involved 
in the leadership and management of schools and of their profession. Teachers are willing to 
accept these new responsibilities; they are willing to take the lead in planning, implementing, 
and evaluating the educational programs needed in our nation's schools. But good intentions 
are not enough. The graduate education program is designed to help teachers gain the 
knowledge necessary and develop the skills required to function as leaders. 



330 Graduate Curricula 



Program Goals 

Graduates of the graduate education programs (GEP) (elementary education, instructional 
technology, supervisor of curriculum and instruction, and educational strategies) will 
demonstrate the ability to: 

1 . Establish mutually respectful relationships with administrators, colleagues, students, 
and parents based on a solid values system that emphasizes mercy, justice, service, 
and hospitality. 

2. Effectively communicate with various school communities regarding current 
educational issues and trends and the principles of teaching and learning, which make 
schools effective and efficient. 

3. Design, organize, and manage system-wide curriculum that prepares students within 
areas relating to the goals of quality education. 

4. Coordinate district-wide subject area activities and subject area curriculum 
development. 

5. Conduct evaluations of curriculum and instruction and apply the results to encourage 
and facilitate curricular and instructional improvements. 

6. Use an understanding of how learning occurs as the basis for making curricular and 
instructional decisions that support the intellectual, social, and personal growth of all 
students. 

7. Use an understanding of individual and group motivation, instructional practices, and 
assessment to create school environments that foster effective and efficient curricular 
and instructional practices and procedures, and that enable all students to master 
curriculum and meet high standards. 

8. Use the tools of research and inquiry to gather and apply information needed to make 
educational decisions. 

9. Identify how educational technology can be used to facilitate and improve teaching and 
learning processes. 

Selection, Retention, Advancement, and Graduation Criteria-Graduate Students 
To ensure quality, the GEP uses a series of assessments to monitor students' progress 
through their programs. Information gathered from these assessments is used to make 
admission, program entry, retention, advancement, and graduation decisions. 

a. Graduate admissions process (traditional and transfer students) 

1 . Initial admissions decisions are made by the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education. Students are accepted to the university to participate in programs 
offered by the GEP only if they meet the following criteria: 

2. Participation in a rigorous undergraduate teacher education program, posting a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0, and having a valid teaching 
certificate. 

3. Demonstration of an interest and commitment to becoming educational leaders 
by participating in volunteer, extracurricular, and/or independent activities in 
which they interact with groups of children. 

4. The ability to demonstrate they can meet a series of "essential performance 
skills" typically expected of educators. 



Graduate Curricula 331 



a. Initial Review Process 

Toward the end of their first semester, graduate students must meet with 
their GEP advisors to present information that indicates both their desire to 
participate in the GEP and that they possess the requisite academic 
abilities and performance skills to succeed in the program. During this 
meeting, the GEP's programs and policies are thoroughly explained. 

a. National Teachers Examination 

Graduate students must complete sections of PRAXIS II— The National 
Teachers Examination (that is, those required of their specialization — see 
www.pde.psu.edu), and meet or exceed the cut scores established by PDE. 

b. Grading 

Graduate students must earn a "B" or better in all education (EDU) classes. 

c. Academic integrity and the honor code 

At the beginning of every course, instructors inform students of the details 
of the GEP's academic integrity policy, which states that students are 
expected to do their own work (except when cooperative projects are 
assigned). If it is demonstrated that a student has submitted work 
completed by others or falsified information, the student's work is awarded 
a failing grade and the student is charged with a violation of the academic 
integrity policy. 

d. Graduation 

Students must meet all of the requirements for at least one GEP program to 
be recommended for graduation. 

e. Teacher Certifications 

Students who have completed one or more of the programs sponsored by 
the GEP and a series of other requirements set by accrediting 
organizations (for example, PRAXIS I and II scores, Act 34, 114, and 151 
clearances), may be recommended for certification to the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education and/or other certifying organizations. Students 
may also opt to qualify for certifications provided by other states. 

Certifications 

All five graduate specializations have been reviewed and approved by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. Thus, students who complete the programs may be eligible for state 
certifications, as long as they meet other requirements established by PDE. Persons 
specializing in elementary education must possess a certification in another instructional area, 
but become eligible for an instructional certification in elementary education. Persons 
specializing in instructional technology become eligible for a program specialist certificate and 
persons specializing in supervision become eligible for a certificate in supervision. In light of 
the recent changes in Pennsylvania's certification guidelines (Chapter 49-2), modifications to 
the elementary and special education certifications will be necessary. 

Specializations 

Cited by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for its "innovative programmatic and 
curricular design," the graduate education program breaks away from traditional programming. 
It reflects and respects the learning styles and schedules of adult learners. 

The graduate education program offers participants a common body of necessary skills and 
knowledge through a common 12-credit core requirement. It then allows students to pursue an 
area of interest by specializing in one of five focus areas — instructional technology, (18 
credits), supervision of curriculum and instruction (18 credits), elementary education (21 



332 Graduate Curricula 



credits), educational strategies (15 credits), and special education (see Tracks 1 through 4 for 
credit totals). Each program includes courses appropriate to the specialization and the 
opportunity to participate in additional elective courses, as well as independent and directed 
studies. The program's unique culminating experiences asks students to share what they have 
learned in their programs with colleagues by developing and implementing an in-service 
workshop. 



Supervision of Curriculum and Instruction 

Teachers should be primarily responsible for planning, implementing, and evaluating 
curriculum and instruction. The supervision specialization of the graduate education program 
gives them the knowledge and skills to deal with curriculum issues. Graduates can function as 
leaders of local school district curriculum planning teams, site-based management teams, 
building-level management teams, and will be able to otherwise work to improve curriculum in 
their schools. Participants in the curriculum track complete the core requirements, several 
required courses, two electives, and a professional contribution. Additionally, students 
participate in a post-graduate, projects-based internship in supervision. 

The specialization meets all of PDE's standards for supervision of instruction and curriculum. 
Candidates for certification must have a valid PDE instructional certificate and must have 
satisfactorily completed at least five years of classroom teaching. 

Candidates for supervision certification must meet the requirements set by PDE, including 
completion of necessary tests. 



Core 

EDU 500 

EDU 504 

EDU 510 

EDU 515 
Required Courses 

EDU 530 

EDU 548 

EDU 521 

EDU 

Electives 

EDU 

EDU 
Professional Contribution 

EDU 565 

EDU 595 
Total 36 credits 

Postgraduate Internship 
EDU 559 



12 credits 



Issues in Education 
Curriculum 
Learning 
Research Methods 



12 credits 



School Law and Finance 
Clinical Supervision 
Teaching Methods 
Technology Course Requirement 

6 credits 
Elective 
Elective 

6 credits 
Staff Development 
Professional Contribution 



6 credits 



Supervision Internship 



Instructional Technology: 

Teachers need to use advanced technology to implement modern curriculum. While they don't 
need to become computer programmers or software writers, they do need to know how to use 
modern technology to plan and deliver instruction. The technology specialization of the 
graduate education program gives teachers the knowledge and skills, as well as the 
certification, they need to implement technology and to improve educational systems. 
Graduates can function as leaders of local school district instructional improvement teams, 



Graduate Curricula 333 



technology planning committees, site-based management teams, building-level management 
teams, and will also be able to otherwise work to improve instruction in their schools by 
helping their colleagues implement technology. 

Participants who specialize in instructional technology complete the core, six required 
technology courses, and a culminating experience. 



Core 


12 credits 


EDU 500 


Issues in Education or EDU 567 Issues in 




Educational Technology 


EDU 504 


Curriculum 


EDU 510 


Learning 


EDU 515 


Research Methods 


Required courses 


18 credits chosen from the following: 


EDU 552 


Multimedia for Instruction 


EDU 553 


Instructional Design 


EDU 554 


Videography 


EDU 556 


Programming for Instruction 


EDU 558 


Introduction to the Internet 


EDU 563 


Hypermedia Theory and Application 


EDU 566 


Principles of Instructional Design 


EDU 568 


Distance Education and Hybrid Technology 


Professional Contribution 


6 credits 


EDU 565 


Staff Development 


EDU 595 


Professional Contribution 


Total 36 credits 





Elementary Education 

Veteran teachers often want to expand their teaching abilities and credentials. Currently 
certified teachers (for example, secondary educators) can prepare to teach in elementary 
classrooms by participating in the graduate education program's specialization in elementary 
education. In addition to becoming skilled curriculum developers, participants in this 
specialization become candidates for certification in elementary education. 

The specialization in elementary education is available only to teachers who already have 
valid PDE instructional certification in another area. The specialization is not designed as a 
vehicle for initial certification; thus it does not deal with the state's general standards for 
teachers. It is designed to help currently certified teachers expand their credentials by adding 
a certification in elementary education. The specialization in elementary education meets all of 
PDE's specific standards for elementary education. 

Candidates for certification must also meet requirements set by PDE. For example, they 
must satisfactorily complete the testing requirements set by PDE. 
Core 12 credits 

EDU 500 Issues in Education 

EDU 504 Curriculum 

EDU 510 Learning 

EDU 515 Research Methods 



334 Graduate Curricula 



Required Courses 

EDU 575 

EDU 590 

EDU 520 

EDU 524 

EDU 525 

EDU 581 

EDU 582 

EDU 
Professional Contribution 

EDU 565 

EDU 595 

Total 39 credits 



21 credits 
Human Development 
Basic Methods in Elementary Education 
Curriculum and Methods in Reading 
Curriculum and Methods in Language Arts 
Curriculum and Methods in Mathematics 
Seminar in Elementary Education 
Observation and Practicum 
Technology Course Requirement 



6 credits 



Staff Development 
Professional Contribution 



Special Education 

The special education specialization is unique in that four different pathways, or tracks, to a 
masters degree and/or certification are offered. Track 1 addresses the needs of educators who 
hold an Instructional I or II Certificate in Special Education. Track 2 addresses the needs of 
educators who already possess an Instruction I or II Certificate in Elementary Education. 
Educators pursing Track 3 hold and Instructional I or II, but not in Elementary or Special 
Education. Track 4 is designed for individuals who do not possess an Instructional I 
Certificate. 

Candidates for certification must also meet requirements set by PDE. For example, they 
must satisfactorily complete the testing requirements set by PDE, and in some cases, the 
student teaching requirement. 



Core 


Choose 12 credits 


EDU 500 


Issues in Education 


EDU 504 


Curriculum 


EDU 510 


Learning 


EDU 515 


Research Methods 


EDU 567 


Issues in Educational Technology 


EDU 517 


Special Education 


EDU 539 


Learning Strategies 


EDU 509 


Assessment 


EDU 573 


Teaching in ESL Programs: Theory and Practice 


12 credits 




Track 1 




EDU 517 


Special Education* 


EDU 515 


Research Methods* 


EDU 526 


Characteristics I 


EDU 527 


Characteristics II 


EDU 528 


Methods I 


EDU 509 


Assessment* 


EDU 529 


Methods II 


EDU 519 


Inclusion 



Graduate Curricula 335 



EDU 539 Learning Strategies* 

EDU 585 Special Topics 

EDU 576 Masters Project (6 credits) 

36 credits (including core courses) 



Track 2 
EDU 517 
EDU 515 
EDU 526 
EDU 527 
EDU 528 
EDU 509 
EDU 529 
EDU 519 
EDU 539 
EDU 585 
EDU 576 
EDU 582 



Special Education* 

Research Methods* 

Characteristics I 

Characteristics II 

Methods I 

Assessment* 

Methods II 

Inclusion 

Learning Strategies* 

Special Topics 

Masters Project (6 cr.) 

Observation and Practice (0-3 cr.) 



37 credits (including core courses) 



Track 3 




EDU 517 


Special Education* 


EDU 515 


Research Methods* 


EDU 526 


Characteristics I 


EDU 527 


Characteristics II 


EDU 528 


Methods I 


EDU 509 


Assessment* 


EDU 529 


Methods II 


EDU 519 


Inclusion 


EDU 539 


Learning Strategies* 


EDU 520 


Reading Methods 


EDU524 


Writing/LA Methods 


EDU 525 


Math Methods 


EDU 576 


Masters Project (6 credits) 


EDU 577 


Field (0 cr.) 


43 credits (including 


core courses) 


Track 4 




EDU 517 


Special Education* 


EDU 515 


Research Methods* 


EDU 504 


Curriculum* 


EDU 505 


Teaching 


EDU 526 


Characteristics I 


EDU 527 


Characteristics II 



336 Graduate Curricula 



EDU 528 Methods I 

EDU519 Inclusion 

EDU 509 Assessment* 

EDU 529 Methods II 

EDU 539 Learning Strategies* 

EDU 520 Reading Methods 

EDU524 Writing/LA Methods 

EDU 525 Math Methods 

EDU 582 Observation and Practice (0-3 cr.) 

EDU 578 Student Teaching (12 cr.) 

54+ credits (including core courses) 



Educational Strategies 

Teachers can expand their knowledge base with the educational specialization in educational 
strategies. This specialization is unique in that it is specifically designed to provide students 
with a graduate degree that combines the perspectives of learning designed coursework 
based on educational needs, and a focus on the K-12 educational spectrum of issues. The 
program provides a method of learning that allows for creativity and flexibility with its modified 
delivery model. This type of program encourages utilization of personal learning styles and 
responds to the educational needs of the community under the guidance of a faculty advisor 
and a variety of mentors. This program is especially appropriate for certified and practicing 
teachers and others interested in combining professional growth with best practices. 

Participants who specialize in educational strategies complete the core, five designated 
graduate courses, and a culminating experience. 

Core 12 credits 

EDU 500 Issues in Education or 

EDU 567 Issues in Educational Technology 

EDU 504 Curriculum 

EDU 510 Learning 

EDU 515 Research Methods 
Designated courses 15 credits chosen from the following: 

EDU 620 Restructuring Schools and Classrooms 

EDU 621 Strategies for Improving Instruction 

EDU 622 Linking Assessment to Improved Instruction 

EDU 623 Teaching to New State and National Standard 

EDU 624 Enhancing School Climate 

EDU 625 Technical Applications in Schools 

EDU 626 Advanced Technological Applications 

EDU 627 Integrating CAI into the Curriculum 

EDU 628 Integrating Desktop Publishing 

EDU 629 Web Page Development and HTML 

EDU 531 College Teaching 

EDU 532 Classroom and Instructional Management 

EDU 533 Computer-Based Education 

EDU 534 Teaching Sensitive Issues 

EDU 535 Cooperative Learning 

EDU 537 Outcomes-Based Education 



Graduate Curricula 337 



EDU 538 Performance-Based Assessment 

EDU 539 Learning Strategies 

EDU 545 Instructional Support Teams/Elementary 

EDU 546 Instructional Support Teams/Secondary 

EDU 547 Collaboration and Consultation 

EDU 523 Curriculum Adaptations for Mainstreamed Adolescents 

EDU 630 Design and Delivery of Distance Learning Programs 
Professional Contribution 3 credits 

EDU 595 Professional Contribution 
Total 30 credits 

Culminating Activity 

As a culminating activity, students are required to develop and deliver a professional 
contribution, which is a project in which they attempt to create curricular change through staff 
development. They first participate in a 3-credit course in staff development, during which they 
develop their projects. During a subsequent semester, they formally deliver their projects to a 
group of colleagues or to a professional group. 

EDU 565 Staff Development 

EDU 595 Professional Contribution 



Structure of the Graduate Curriculum 

The curriculum of the graduate education program requires all students to complete four core 

courses, a specialization track, and a professional contribution. 

Core Courses 

EDU 500 Issues in Education 

or EDU 567 Issues in Educational Technology 
EDU 504 Curriculum 

EDU 510 Learning 

EDU 515 Research Methods 

Course Scheduling and Sequence 

The graduate education program utilizes evening, weekend, online or on-campus formats 
throughout the school year and during the summer months. Students who enroll on a part-time 
basis can complete the program in three years. Full-time students can complete the program 
in two years. Students may take up to nine credits during each of the semesters of the school 
year and up to 12 credits during the summer term. 

Graduate Education Course Descriptions (EDU) 

500 Issues and Trends in Education 3 credits 

Examines curriculum decision-making in light of federal and state legislation, court 
decisions, public policy, recent research, and exemplary educational program. Students 
complete a series of readings, participate in discussions, and complete a major paper. 



338 Graduate Curricula 



504 Curriculum 3 credits 

Examines the theories and models and procedures of curriculum design and 
assessment. Students design and assess actual curriculum. 

500 Issues and Trends in Education 3 credits 

This course prepares students to understand, administer and/or interpret assessment 
information in educational settings. 

Prerequisite: EDU 517 

510 Learning 3 credits 

Relates major contemporary theories of education to current methods of teaching. 
Discusses how the theories and methods affect curriculum and curriculum decisions. 
Students create a project that relates theories and methods to curriculum decisions. 

515 Research Methods 3 credits 

Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques 
associated with the investigation of specific research problems in organizational behavior 
and management. 

Prerequisite: MTH 115 

517 Special Education 3 credits 

Students will identify the historical, philosophical, and the legal foundations of special 
education. 

518 The Internet i 3 credits 
Provides students with an opportunity to explore electronic communications and 
information storage, access, and use as they relate to the Internet. Students will develop 
skills needed for personal communications, web information, Internet research, and 
telecomputing. 

519 Inclusion 3 credits 
This course introduces students to the nature and purposes of inclusion of students with 
disabilities in regular education. It highlights research-based planning, instructional, 
management, assessment, and communication practices. These practices facilitate 
successful inclusion of students with various disabilities. 

Prerequisite: EDU 517 

520 Curriculum and Methods in Reading 3 credits 
Focuses on effective and efficient teaching methods and materials, used to teach 
reading in elementary classrooms. This course is designed for currently certified 
teachers. 

Prerequisite: EDU 590 

521 Teaching Methods 3 credits 

Prepares supervisors to identify and support 'best practices' in planning, implementing, 
and assessing instruction. 

523 Curriculum Adaptations for Mainstreamed Adolescents 3 credits 

Prepares special and regular educators to effectively integrate mildly handicapped 
students in regular education. 



Graduate Curricula 339 



524 Curriculum and Methods in Language Arts 3 credits 
Focuses on effective and efficient teaching methods and materials, used to teach 
language arts in elementary classrooms. This course is designed for currently certified 
teachers. 

Prerequisite: EDU 590 

525 Curriculum and Methods in Mathematics 3 credits 
Focuses on effective and efficient teaching methods and materials, used to teach 
mathematics in elementary classrooms. It is designed for currently certified teachers. 

Prerequisite: EDU 590 

526 Characteristics I 3 credits 
This course helps students to develop an in depth knowledge of individuals (across the 
life span) with disabilities. These individuals are served by special education because of 
mental retardation, physical disabilities, health impairments and autistic spectrum 
disorders. It focuses on etiology, characteristics that affect learning and teaching, as 
well as identification and assessment of individuals with disabilities. 

Prerequisite: EDU 517 

527 Characteristics II 3 credits 

This course helps students to develop an in depth knowledge of individuals (across the 
life span) with disabilities. These individuals are served by special education because of 
learning disabilities, emotional disturbances, and other health impairments as manifest in 
conditions such as ADHD. It focuses on etiology and characteristics that affect learning 
and teaching, as well as identification and assessment of individuals with disabilities. 

Prerequisite: EDU 526 

528 Methods I 3 credits 
This course allows students to develop advanced skills needed to plan, implement, and 
assess teaching and learning in programs for students with moderate to profound 
disabilities. 

Prerequisite: EDU 526 

529 Methods II 3 credits 
This course allows students to develop advanced skills needed to plan, implement, and 
assess teaching and learning in learning support and emotional support programs. 

Prerequisite: EDU 528 

530 School Law and Finance 3 credits 
Introduces students to how state and local school district laws and policies govern 
curriculum and how school programs are financed. 

531 College Teaching 3 credits 
Introduces prospective and novice college faculty to instructional practices and 
procedures related to teaching college courses. Topics include developing syllabi and 
instructional plans, teaching methods, test construction, and evaluation procedures. 



340 Graduate Curricula 



532 Classroom and Instructional Management 3 credits 
Identifies how special educators and elementary teachers can improve how they 
manage classrooms. Motivation and discipline issues are discussed. 

533 Computer-based Education 3 credits 
This laboratory course allows students to experience first-hand the effects of computer- 
based educational programs and create an awareness of how CBA can be used in 
schools. 

534 Teaching Sensitive Issues 3 credits 
This course identifies educationally sensitive issues related to sex education and related 
topics and prepare to deal with the issues in classroom situations. 

535 Cooperative Learning 3 credits 
Introduces students to cooperative learning and develops skills related to the 
implementation of cooperative learning strategies in elementary and secondary schools. 

537 Outcomes-based Education 3 credits 
This course introduces students to OBE and to policies and procedures that facilitate the 
effective implementation of outcomes-based programs. 

538 Performance-based Assessment 3 credits 
This course introduces students to performance-based assessment and to policies and 
procedures which facilitate the effective implementation of PBA in classroom situations. 

539 Learning Strategies \ 3 credits 
This course introduces students to the Strategies Intervention Model (SIM), an approach 
to helping at-risk secondary students by empowering them with learning strategies 
(Kansas University). 

545 Instructional Support Teams/Elementary 1 credit 
This advanced course helps elementary teachers apply concepts of instructional support 
in their school settings. 

546 Instructional Support Teams/Secondary 1 credit 
This advanced course helps middle level and secondary teachers apply concepts of 
instructional support in their school settings. 

547 Collaboration and Consultation 3 credits 
This course introduces a process regular and special education teachers can follow to 
jointly implement programs to assist at-risk students. 

548 Clinical Supervision 3 credits 
This course explores and implements models and practices of clinical supervision. 
Supervision projects are completed in the field. 

552 Multimedia for Instruction 3 credits 

This course introduces students to the development and use of multimedia in education 
and training. Students examine current uses of multimedia and consider its future. 
Students create graphic, video, and audio media, as well as new formats as they 
emerge. 



Graduate Curricula 34 1 



553 Instructional Design 3 credits 
This course reviews models of teaching and training which might be used in professional 
development activities (e.g., in-service programs, college teaching, training activities) to 
determine whether and how they can be improved by applications of educational 
technology. 

554 Videography 3 credits 
This course prepares students to create a production for use in a digital environment. 

556 Programming for Instruction 3 credits 

This course introduces students to computer programming for educational and training 
applications. It emphasizes interface design and interactivity. The language(s) will vary 
with needs and trends. 

558 Introduction to Networking 3 credits 
This course introduces students to the types of computer networking needed for 
distribution of educational and training applications. Languages and platforms used are 
determined in response to the needs of students enrolled and trends in education and 
training. 

559 Supervision Internship 3 credits 
This post-degree internship allows candidates for certification in supervision to engage in 
activities typical of educators who work as supervisors of curriculum and instruction. The 
internship is project-based and requires two semesters to complete. 

563 Hypermedia Theory and Application 3 credits 

Using both laboratory classroom situations and equipment, this course introduces 
students to computer-based techniques that teachers and trainers might use to develop 
and deliver instruction and training. 

565 Staff Development 3 credits 
This course helps students identify and develop skills needed to plan, implement, and 
assess professional development programs for school faculties and business personnel. 
Procedures and practices related to conducting needs assessments and to delivering 
and evaluating the effects of in-service programs are highlighted. Students actually 
prepare a development activity that they may use to complete their professional 
contributions. 

566 Principles of Interface Design 3 credits 
This course introduces students to procedures used to create computer-based interface 
and screen designs. Commercially available and web-based programs and units are 
evaluated in terms of how well they relate to design principles and as to their efficiency. 

567 Issues and Trends in Educational Technology 3 credits 
This course provides students with an opportunity to investigate current issues related to 
computer-moderated teaching and learning. 

568 Distance Education and Hybrid Technologies 3 credits 
This course introduces students to the operation of distributed educational technologies, 
including the development and delivery of asynchronous and synchronous mediated and 
stand-alone communication technologies, including distance learning. 



342 Graduate Curricula 



575 Human Development 3 credits 
An in-depth study of growth and development as it relates to elementary-aged students, 
this course explores current research and recent developments in educational 
psychology. 

576 Masters Project 6 credits 
This course is designed to be a practical hands-on culminating experience to the special 
education specialization of the masters program. It is designed to be a flexible yet 
rigorous course. 

577 Field credits 
All graduate education majors seeking certification must independently propose and then 
deliver a set of projects related to the needs of a community classroom or another 
setting that serves students they will eventually teach (e.g., a group home, a preschool, 
etc.)- Students must complete a minimum of twenty five (25) hours observing veteran 
classroom teachers and participating in their classrooms. 

578 Student Teaching 12 credits 

The culminating activity of the university's graduate education program for candidates 
seeking certification is the student teaching experience. This experience places students 
(all majors) in classroom situations where they complete their development as teachers 
by demonstrating their abilities to fully function as classroom teachers. Student teachers 
spend the first half of the student teaching semester in one setting and the second half in 
another. In each placement student teachers work under the guidance and 
supervision of master teachers and university supervisors. 

581 Seminar in Elementary Education 3 credits 
Current issues and trends in elementary education are addressed. 

582 Observation and Practice 0-3 credits 

Elementary specialization participants are expected to log 100 hours observing and 
participating in elementary classrooms. Specific objectives must be met and students 
must maintain journals. 

585 Special Topics Variable credit 

The graduate education program features a series of 1-, 2-, and 3-credit courses, which 
deal with special topics of interest to teachers. They are taught by respected and expert 
adjunct faculty who are leaders in their communities and/or schools. A few special topics 
are scheduled each semester and several are available during the summer term. Most 
special topics may be used as electives within the graduate education program. 
Special topics courses have included: 

Integrating Learning Systems 

College Programs for Disabled Students 

Integrating Technology in the Classroom 

Religion in Public Schools 

The Federal Education Agenda 

Characteristics of Excellence 

Sensitive Issues in Sexuality 

Multicultural Education: Heritage Curriculum 

Integration Curriculum 

Censorship in the Arts 

Multicultural Education: Literature in High School 

Curriculum of the Future 

Curriculum Update: State Requirements 



Graduate Curricula 343 



Education in Japan 

The Self-Study Process 

Ethics in Education 

Adaptations for Exceptional Students/Secondary 

Parents'/Students' Rights in Special Education 

Preparing Students for Post- Secondary Education 

590 Basic Methods in Elementary Education 3 credits 

This course focuses on the structure and process of elementary education and highlights 
effective and efficient teaching methods and materials, which may be used in elementary 
education. This course is designed for currently certified, albeit not elementary, teachers. 

595 Professional Contribution 3 credits 

This course allows students the opportunity to implement major curriculum projects by 
conducting and formally and publicly presenting their professional contributions. 

Prerequisite: EDU 565 

599 Independent Study Variable credit 

This course allows students to conduct independent investigations of specific topics of 
interest and/or to complete a school-based project. They are planned, implemented, and 
evaluated with the assistance of a mentor appointed by Misericordia University. A 
contract learning format is used. 

620 Restructuring Schools and Classrooms 3 credits 
This course assists teachers and administrators to develop a knowledge of research, 
motivation, theories, and successful initiatives involved in the school reform effort. 

621 Strategies for Improving Instruction 3 credits 
This course examines strategies teachers need to implement more flexible, creative 
approaches to instruction found in schools and classrooms implementing restructuring to 
create 21st century classrooms. 

622 Linking Assessment to Improved Instruction 3 credits 
This course describes what changes in assessment mean for schools trying to 
restructure and meet new state and national performance standards. 

623 Teaching to New State and National Standards 3 credits 
This course reviews current state and national performance and curriculum standards, 
shares findings from policy makers on making instructional decisions in local schools, 
and allows participants to develop implementation strategies in their curricular areas. 

624 Enhancing School Climate 3 credits 
This course presents research-based strategies that create a positive school climate, 
improve leadership and collaboration, and enhance individual effectiveness and 
resiliency to organizational change. 

625 Technical Applications in Schools 3 credits 
This course explores the promise an assortment of technologies hold for teaching to 
diverse learners, reaching equity, and teaching to high standards in heterogeneous 
classrooms. 



344 Graduate Curricula 



626 Advanced Technological Applications 3 credits 
This course enables participants to perform advanced functions including creating 
directories, performing back up procedures, restoring files, creating batch files, and 
performing multitasking through windows applications. Spreadsheet and data based 
tools as well as PowerPoint are integrated. 

627 Integrating CAI into the Curriculum 3 credits 
This course enables students to use the more popular computer assisted instructional 
programs and integrated learning systems (Jostens, CCC, IBM's TLC, etc.) in both 
classroom and laboratory settings. 

628 Integrating Desktop Publishing 3 credits 

This course prepares students to develop the understandings and skills necessary to 
use desktop publishing programs such as Works, Word, WordPerfect, Publisher, and 
related applications. 

629 Web Page Development and HTML 3 credits 
This course prepares students to become competent in the design and construction of 
Web Pages using HTML authoring language. 

630 Design and Delivery of Distance Learning Programs 3 credits 

This course familiarizes students with the uses of satellite technology, interactive video 
conferencing, and other distance learning strategies for use in the 21st century 
classroom. 

Transfer Students v 

The graduate education program allows students to transfer up to six credits from other 
accredited graduate programs. Students who have earned a master's equivalency certificate 
from the Pennsylvania Department of Education may transfer up to nine credits. Students who 
have completed graduate degrees at other institutions may transfer up to 12 credits. All 
requests for credit transfers must be reviewed and approved by the registrar in consultation 
with the director of the graduate education program. 



Teaching English as a Second Language 
Post-baccalaureate Certificate 

See Teaching English as a Second Language Certificate, page 307. 



Nursing 

College of Health Sciences 

Degree MSN, Nursing 

Program Director, Brenda Hage, PhD 

Faculty 

Brenda Hage, Associate Professor of Nursing, BSN State University of New York at Albany; 
MSN College Misericordia, PhD Virginia Commonwealth University 
Cynthia Mailloux, Associate Professor of Nursing, BSN, Wilkes University; MSN College 
Misericordia; PhD Pennsylvania State University 

Brenda Pavill, Associate Professor of Nursing, BS Wilkes University; MS Bloomsburg University; 
MSN College Misericordia; PhD Marywood University 

Donna Ayers Snelson, Associate Professor of Nursing, BSNE Wilkes University; MSN University 
of Pennsylvania 



Graduate Curricula 345 



Jean R. Steelman, Professor of Nursing, BS Wilkes University; MSN College Misericordia; PhD 
New York University 

Annette Weiss, Assistant Professor of Nurisng, BSN The Pennsylvania State School of Nursing, 
MSN University of Hartford 

Graduate Nursing Program 

Graduate education enables professional nurses to realize their creative leadership potential 
and provides opportunities for collaborative functioning with health professionals and others in 
effecting change in nursing practice and health care. Specialization occurs on the graduate 
level, which provides for in-depth knowledge and experience in specific clinical and functional 
areas. Advanced knowledge provides the foundation for effective leadership in nursing. 
Scientific inquiry is an integral part of graduate education in nursing. Such inquiry provides the 
basis for acquisition of increased competencies in utilization of research and increased 
knowledge base in the analysis and synthesis of theories related to the practice of nursing. 
Graduate education provides the foundation for doctoral study in nursing. 

Program Description 

The nursing faculty believes that advanced practice nurses are expert clinicians with master's 
degree educational preparation. These practitioners are prepared to function as providers and 
organizers of the health care delivery process as well as in faculty positions in nursing 
education or in mid-level administration positions. The primary role of the advanced practice 
nurse is the clinical role; case management processes and educational theories and methods 
are used to enhance the practitioner's expert base of advanced practice clinical skills and 
knowledge. 

Master's-prepared nurses directly assess, make clinical decisions, and manage health 
problems and health promotion needs of individuals, families, and communities. In addition, 
their jobs often require them to teach and supervise professional and non-professional staff, 
oversee quality assurance, utilize clinical research, and implement and evaluate programs to 
promote health. The master's program prepares advanced practice nurses by blending 
graduate core courses with the clinical and functional foci necessary to prepare flexible 
providers who can respond to the comprehensive needs of clients in the 21st century. 

Program Goals 

The graduate nursing program at Misericordia University is designed to: 

1. provide clinically prepared nurse educators, practitioners, and administrators for 
leadership positions in nursing education and the health care delivery system; 

2. prepare graduates to use the research process to improve nursing practice, nursing 
education, and contribute to nursing's body of knowledge; 

3. prepare graduates to initiate innovative, creative approaches to the emerging needs 
and demands of society related to the health care delivery system; and 

4. provide an educational base for graduates to pursue further education and 
professional development. 

Admission Criteria for Graduate Nursing Program 

Full Admission - Applicants are eligible for full admission to the graduate nursing program if: 
(1) they have an undergraduate GPA between 2.50 and 2.99 and have scored in at least the 
35th percentile on the MAT or GRE examination; or (2) they have an undergraduate GPA of 
3.00 or higher and have scored in the 25th percentile or higher on the MAT or GRE 
examinations. 



346 Graduate Curricula 



Provisional Admission - Applicants who have an undergraduate GPA of 2.50 to 2.99 and have 
scored below the 35th percentile on the MAT or GRE examination are eligible for provisional 
admission. Students in this category will be required to complete 12 graduate credits at 
Misericordia University, half of which must be in required courses, with grades no lower than 
"B" before being granted full and unconditional admission to the graduate nursing program. 

Denied Admission - Applicants who have less than a 2.50 undergraduate GPA or score below 
the 25th percentile on the MAT or GRE examination will be denied admission to the graduate 
nursing program. Applicants to all graduate nursing programs must submit the following 
documentation in addition to that required by the university: 

a. official transcripts demonstrating graduation from an NLN- or CCNE-accredited 
baccalaureate nursing program; 

b. a statement of the applicant's professional goals for graduate education; 

c. a copy of the applicant's current professional nurse registration; 

d. transcript documentation of an undergraduate physical assessment course or 
equivalent evidence, an undergraduate statistics course; and an undergraduate 
research course; and evidence of a minimum of one year of recent clinical practice. 

In addition to b, c, and d above, applicants to the post-master's certificate program must 
submit: 

a. official transcripts demonstrating completion of a master's degree in nursing; and 

b. transcript or equivalent evidence of graduate level pathophysiology, 
pharmacology, and health assessment and role development courses. 

Additional information 

V 

a. Computer literacy is an expectation for all graduate nursing courses. E-mail 
addresses and Internet access are provided by the university. 

Admission Criteria for Admission to RN to MSN Program 

Full Admission - Registered nurse applicants are eligible for full admission to the RN to MSN 
program if they meet the following criteria, in addition to that required by the university: 

a. graduation from an approved associate's degree or diploma nursing program. 
Students are required to submit transcripts of all prior college-level course work 
and a copy of the RN license; 

b. minimum grade point average of 2.75 for all prior college-level course work; 

c. official written verification of a minimum of 1 ,000 hours of clinical practice in the 
past three years (waived for graduates of basic nursing programs in the three years 
prior to application); 

d. acceptable Miller Analogy Test (MAT) scores (see below); 

e. a statement of professional goals for graduate education; and, 

f. three letters of recommendation. 

Applicants whose GPA is 2.75 to 2.99 must have a MAT score at the 35th percentile; 
applicants with a GPA of 3.00 or higher must have a minimum MAT score of the 25th 
percentile. 

Denied Admission - Registered nurse applicants who have a GPA of less than 2.75 will be 
denied admission to the RN to MSN program. 



Graduate Curricula 347 



Additional Information 

Curriculum 

The graduate nursing curriculum consists of courses in three areas: the graduate nursing core, 
the advanced practice core, and the clinical and/or functional specialization. 

The graduate nursing core courses provide support for clinical and functional role development 
and focus on such areas as research; policy, organization and financing of health care; ethics; 
theoretical foundations of nursing practice; and human diversity and social issues. The 
graduate nursing core culminates in a capstone course in which all candidates for the master 
of science degree in nursing demonstrate the ability to integrate theory, research, and clinical 
and/or functional practice. 

The advanced practice nursing core courses build on knowledge acquired from the graduate 
nursing core and provide students with foundational understanding of professional role 
development, advanced assessment, pathophysiology, and pharmacology. 

Advanced practice clinical specialization courses reflect the changing trends in health care 
that require application of advanced clinical skills and development of collaborative roles. All 
clinical management courses provide for precepted clinical practice that concentrates on 
health restoration, health maintenance and health promotion. Clinical practice courses 
incorporate recommendations from ANA's Standards and Scope of Nursing Practice; Healthy 
People 2010; AACN's Essentials of Master's Education for Advanced Practice Nursing; and 
NONPF's Curriculum Guidelines and Program Standards for Nurse Practitioner Education. 
Students who select any of the advance practice options, with the exception of the family 
nurse practitioner option, also complete course work in the functional specialization areas of 
nursing education or administration. All graduate nursing students must have the following 
documents on file before beginning clinical experiences: current copy of professional license, 
CPR certification, health clearance, professional liability insurance, and criminal record and 
child abuse check. 

The curricular options currently offered by the nursing department include: 

Clinical Nurse Specialist: The adult option provides students with advanced clinical nursing 
skills to address health promotion needs of adults and to collaborate with members of the 
health care team in managing episodic and chronic health care problems of adults in acute 
care, ambulatory care, HMOs, long-term care, and home care settings. This option consists of 
43 credits in the areas of the graduate nursing core, advanced practice core, adult health 
clinical specialization and functional specialization. Students must complete 500 hours of 
clinical practice under the direct supervision of qualified preceptors. Graduates who complete 
this course of study may take the examination for certification by the American Nurses' 
Credentialing Center (ANCC) as a clinical nurse specialist in medical-surgical nursing. 

Clinical Nurse Specialist: The women and children's health option gives students the 
opportunity to develop advanced nursing skills to provide care to women and children in a 
variety of inpatient and outpatient settings. The focus of this 43-credit program of study is the 
clinical management of common health promotion needs and problems of women and 
children. Students complete a minimum of 500 hours of precepted clinical practice along with 
courses in the graduate nursing core, the advanced practice core, and clinical and functional 
specialization areas. Graduates are prepared to work collaboratively with other health care 
providers in school-based clinics, well-child and prenatal clinics, inpatient obstetrical and 
pediatric units, ambulatory care, and other community agencies serving women and children. 
Students who complete this course of study may seek certification through the Association of 



348 Graduate Curricula 



Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nursing's (AWHONN) examinations in the areas of 
ambulatory women's health, maternal newborn nursing, and low-risk neonatal nursing. 

Family Nurse Practitioner: The Family Nurse Practitioner option prepares students to function 
as principal providers of primary health care to families and individuals across the life span. 
The focus of this 45-credit program of study is the primary care management of acute episodic 
and stable, chronic health problems of individuals and families. Students complete the 
graduate nursing core, the advanced practice core, and clinical specialization courses along 
with a minimum of 650 hours of direct clinical practice under the supervision of qualified nurse 
practitioner and physician preceptors. Graduates are certified as nurse practitioners in family 
health and qualify to take national family nurse practitioner certification examinations offered 
by the ANCC and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. 

The Post-master's Certificate Options: 

1. Family Nurse Practitioner 

The family nurse practitioner certificate option provides the opportunity for nurses 
who already have an earned master's degree in nursing in another clinical 
specialization to complete requirements to qualify for certification as a family nurse 
practitioner. The certificate program consists of a minimum of 24 credits from the 
advanced practice nursing core and the clinical specialization area. Additional 
credits in pathophysiology, pharmacology, and health assessment and role 
development may be required based on evaluation of previous university and 
professional experiences. Post-master's certificate program students complete a 
minimum of 630 hours of directed clinical practice in primary care under the 
supervision of qualified clinicians. 

2. Nursing Education 

The nursing education certificate option provides the opportunity for nurses who 
have an earned master's degree in nursing to extend their knowledge in the area of 
nursing education. This certificate program consists of twelve credits which include 
NSG 504, NSG 505, NSG 535, and NSG 570 

Program Scheduling 

All graduate nursing options are available in a part-time evening format. Selected courses may 
be offered in an online or accelerated format. All graduate nursing courses are scheduled for 
Thursday beginning at 4:00 pm. 

Structure of the Graduate Nursing Program 

Core Graduate Nursing Courses 12 credits 

NSG 512 Concepts and Theories in Nursing 3 

NSG 517 Research Analysis and Utilization 3 

NSG 555 Legal, Ethical, and Public Policy Issues in Health Care 3 

NSG 599 Graduate Synthesis 3 

Core Advanced Practice Nursing 9 credits 

NSG 514 Foundations of Advanced Practice Nursing 3 

NSG 551 Advanced Pharmacology 3 

NSG 552 Pathophysiology for Advanced Practice 3 



Graduate Curricula 349 



Nursing Clinical Specialization Courses Adult Health 13 credits 

NSG 557 Care of Adults with Health Promotion Needs and Episodic 2 

Health Problems 

NSG 562 Care of Adults with Chronic Health Needs and Problems 2 

NSG 576 Advanced Nursing Management of Adults with Health 3 

Promotion Needs and Episodic Health Problems 

NSG 577 Advanced Nursing Management of Adults with Chronic 3 

Health Needs and Problems 

NSG 591 Advanced Practice Nursing Clinical Synthesis 3 



Women 's and Children 's Health 10 credits 

NSG 559 Health Care of Women 3 

NSG 565 Health Care of Children 3 

NSG 578 Advanced Nursing Management of Women with Health 2 

Promotion Needs and Health Problems 

NSG 579 Advanced Nursing Management of Children with Health 2 

Promotion Needs and Health Problems 



24 credits 



Family Nurse Practitioner 

NSG 554 Diagnostic Reasoning and Therapeutic Interventions for 

Primary Care Nursing 
NSG 556 Primary Care Management of Children with Health 

Promotion Needs and Health Problems 
NSG 557 Care of Adults with Health Promotion Needs and Episodic 

Health Problems 
NSG 558 Primary Care Management of Adults with Health Promotion 

Needs and Episodic Health Problems 
NSG 559 Health Care of Women 
NSG 561 Primary Care Management of Women's Health Problems 

and Health Promotion Needs 
NSG 562 Care of Adults with Chronic Health Needs and Problems 
NSG 563 Primary Care Management of Adults with Chronic Health 

Needs and Problems 
NSG 565 Health Care of Children 
NSG 567 Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical Synthesis 



Functional Specialization 12 credits 

All students who have not selected the family nurse practitioner clinical specialization option 
are required to complete nine credits in a functional specialization. The functional 
specialization that is offered is nursing education. 



Nursing Education 
NSG 504 
NSG 505 
NSG 570 
NSG 535 



Curriculum Design 
Teaching-Learning Strategies 
Faculty Role Development 
Nursing Education Practicum 



350 Graduate Curricula 



Sample Course Sequencing 



Clinical Nurse Specialist: Adult Health 



Semester 1 






Semester 5 






NSG 551 
NSG 552 


Advanced Pharmacology 
Pathophysiology 


3 
3 


NSG 562 
NSG 577 


Care Chronic Adult 
Clin Mgmt. Chronic 


2 
3 


Semester 2 






Semester 6 






NSG 512 
NSG 514 


Concepts and Theories 
Foundations of APN 


3 
2 


NSG 555 


Legal, Ethical, Pub. Pol. 
Functional Area Course 


3 
3 


Semester 3 






Semester 7 






NSG 517 
Semester 4 

NSG 557 
NSG 576 


Research Analysis & 
Utilization 

Functional Area Course 
Episodic Adult 
Clin. Mgmt. Episodic 


3 

3 
2 
3 


Functional Practicum 

Semester 8 

NSG 599 Synthesis 

NSG 591 Clinical Synthesis 

Total Credits 43 credits 


3 

3 
3 



Clinical Nurse Specialist: Women and Children's Health 




Semester 1 




Semester 5 






NSG 551 Advanced Pharmacology 


3 


NSG 559 


Health Care Women 


3 


NSG 552 Pathophysiology 


3 


NSG 578 


Clin. Mgmt. Women 


3 


Semester 2 




Semester 6 






NSG 512 Concepts and Theories 


3 




Functional Area Course 


3 


NSG 514 Foundations of APN 


3 


NSG 555 
Semester 7 


Legal, Ethical, Pub. Pol. 


3 


Semester 3 






Functional Practicum 


3 


NSG 517 Research Analysis & 
Utilization 


3 


Semester 8 






Semester 4 

Functional Area Course 
NSG 565 Health Care Child 


3 
3 


NSG 599 Synthesis 

NSG 591 Clinical Synthesis 

Total Credits 45 credits 


3 
3 


NSG 579 Clin. Mgmt. Children 


3 









Graduate Curricula 351 



Family Nurse Practitioner Option 

Semester 1 

NSG 551 Advanced Pharmacology 

NSG 552 Pathophysiology 

Semester 2 

NSG 512 Concepts and Theories 

NSG 514 Foundations of APN 

Semester 3 

NSG 517 Research Analysis, 



NSG 554 
Semester 4 



Utilization 
Diagnostic Reason 



NSG 555 Legal, Ethical, Public 

Policy Issues 
NSG 557 Episodic Adult 
NSG 558 Prim. Care Epi. Adult 



Semester 5 



3 


NSG 562 Chronic Adult 


3 


NSG 563 Ph. Care Chronic Adult 




Semester 6 


3 


NSG 565 Health Care Child 


3 


NSG 556 Ph. Care Mgmt. Child 




Semester 7 


3 


NSG 559 Health Care Women 




NSG 561 Ph. Care Mgmt. Women 


3 


Semester 8 



NSG 599 Synthesis 

NSG 567 FNP Clinical Synthesis 

Total Credits 45 credits 



Family Nurse Practitioner Post-Master's Certificate Option* 



Semester 1 

NSG 554 Diagnostic Reasoning 

NSG 552 Pathophysiology 

Semester 2 

NSG 557 Episodic Adult 

NSG 558 Prim. Care Epi. Adult 

Semester 3 

NSG 559 Health Care Women 

NSG 561 Prim. Care Women 





Semester 4 






3 


NSG 565 


Health Care Child 


3 


3 


NSG 556 

Semester 5 


Prim. Care Mgmt. Child 


2 


2 


NSG 562 


Chronic Adult 


2 


2 


NSG 563 


Primary Care, Chronic 
Adults 


2 


3 


Semester 6 






2 


NSG 567 


FNP Clin. Synthesis 


2 



Total Credits 24* credits 



352 Graduate Curricula 



Nursing Education Certificate Post Master's Option 



Semester 1 

NSG 570 Faculty Role Development 3 
NSG 535 Nursing Education 3 

Practicum 



Semester 2 

NSG 504 Curriculum Design 

NSG 505 Teaching Learning 

Strategies 
Total Credits 12* credits 



The RN to MSN Option 

In response to the identified national need for a sufficient supply of expert clinicians and the 
profession's call for flexibility in the development of new initiatives and programs, the nursing 
department offers an alternative educational format for practicing registered nurses who wish 
to advance their educational base and/or who seek re-tooling for the health care marketplace 
of the 21st century. This innovative curriculum gives registered nurse students who do not 
hold a bachelor's degree in nursing, but who have graduated from NLN accredited diploma or 
associate's degree programs and have remained in clinical practice, the opportunity to earn 
both the bachelor's and master's degree upon graduation. 

Applicants who meet admission requirements (See program specific admission requirements 
section in admissions information section of catalog) complete both undergraduate and 
graduate courses in a sequence that allows students to "bridge" to the MSN program without 
first earning a bachelor of science in nursing. Students who are accepted into the RN to MSN 
program must meet all program-specific admission, progression and retention, and other 
graduate policies as specified in this catalog. (Please see graduate program policies and 
procedures section of catalog.) 

Associate degree graduates must have at least one course in each area of the core noted on 
their transcript. Courses transferred from another institution may represent the area of the core 
that it satisfies. After matriculation, only six credits may be taken off campus at another four- 
year institution; only three of these are permitted to be core courses. Registered nurses who 
have completed a bachelor's degree in another field are exempt from the core requirements. 

All RN to MSN students complete the following: 



Core Requirements (number of credits vary) 

Required Cognates Courses 

HP 241 Fundamentals of Nutrition 

MTH115 Basic Statistics 



(6 credits): 
(3 credits) 
(3 credits) 



Required Professional Nursing Courses (19 credits) 

NSG 397 Professional Nursing Concepts I (2 credits) 

NSG 398 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan (3 credits) 

NSG 460 Professional Nursing Concepts II (4 credits) 

NSG 465 Application of Professional Nursing Concepts (4 credits) 

NSG 410 Introduction to Nursing Research (3 credits) 

NSG 555 Legal, Ethical, and Public Policy Issues in Health Care (3 credits) 
Electives (as necessary for credit requirements) 

(Graduate clinical specialization courses vary according to specialization selected. See 
curricular options.) 



Graduate Curricula 353 



Because applicants hold a professional license prior to admission to the RN to MSN Program, 
this option is designated as a 5-year professional program. The time required to complete the 
RN to MSN program varies with the level of basic preparation, the number of credits 
transferred into the program from the basic program, and the clinical specialization that is 
selected. 

Those associate degree registered nurse students, who select the adult health option, 
complete 122 total credits; diploma graduates complete 134 credits. For the women and 
children's health option, the total credits required for associate degree nurses is 124; for 
diploma nurses the total is 136. The family nurse practitioner option consists of 129 total 
credits for associate degree students and 141 for diploma graduates. 

A sample curriculum plan follows for the RN to MSN: Family Nurse Practitioner Option only. 
Similar models are followed for other clinical specializations. 

Completion of undergraduate core requirements, cognates, professional nursing major, and 
electives (as necessary) followed by the graduate clinical specialization semesters. 

Graduate Semester 1 

NSG 551 Advanced Pharmacology 3 

NSG 552 Pathophysiology 3 

Total Credits 6 

Graduate Semester 2 

NSG 512 Concepts /Theories 3 

NSG 514 Foundations of APN 3 

Total Credits 6 

Graduate Semester 3 

NSG 517 Research Analysis & Utilization 3 

NSG 554 Diagnostic Reasoning 3 

Total Credits 6 

Graduate Semester 4 

NSG 555 Leg, Eth, Pub Policy 3 

NSG 557 Episodic Adult 2 

NSG 558 Prim. Care Epi. Adit. 2 

Total Credits 7 

Graduate Semester 5 

NSG 562 Chronic Adult 2 

NSG 563 Prim. Care Chron. Adit. 2 

Total Credits 5 

Graduate Semester 6 

NSG 565 Health Care of Child. 3 

NSG 556 Prim. Care Mgmt. Child. 2 

Total Credits 5 



354 Graduate Curricula 






Graduate Semester 7 

NSG 559 Health of Women 3 

NSG 561 Primary Care Women 2 

Total Credits 5 

Graduate Semester 8 

NSG 599 Graduate Synthesis 3 

NSG 567 FNP Clin. Synthesis 3 

Total Credits 6 



Nursing Course Descriptions (NSG) 

504 Curriculum Design 3 credits 
An examination of the foundations, models and procedures of curriculum design in 
nursing. Curriculum theories and practice are explored. 

505 Teaching-learning Strategies 3 credits 
This course places emphasis on teaching and learning theories. Students are exposed to 
a variety of modalities utilized in teaching both theory and clinical courses. Test 
construction and clinical evaluation methods are included. 

512 Concepts and Theories in Nursing 3 credits 

This course utilizes the critical reasoning process to examine the elements of nursing 
knowledge. Emphasis is placed on concept analysis and the evaluation of nursing and 
shared theories, including family theory. Identification of the links between theory and 
empirical indicators is examined. The clinical relevance of mid-range and family theory is 
explored. 

514 Foundations of Advanced Practice Nursing 3 credits 

Emphasis is placed on the foundations of advanced nursing practice. Course content 
focuses on the analysis of the health status of individuals, families, and communities. 
Students learn to develop a comprehensive database, including skills in health history and 
physical examination. Family and community assessment techniques are examined. 
Conceptualizations, role development, and competencies of advanced practice are also 
explored. Laboratory practice hours are required for this course. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate health assessment course, and NSG 552 

517 Research Analysis and Utilization 3 credits 

This course examines the principles and processes of research. Characteristics of 
quantitative and qualitative research methods are explored. Emphasis placed on data 
analysis, critique, and utilization of research findings in practice. 

Prerequisites: MTH 115 and undergrad. research course or permission of instructor 

535 Nursing Education Practicum 3 credits 

This course provides opportunities for students to develop the skills of classroom and 
clinical teaching and evaluation using various modalities. Students will explore the need to 
interface with faculty from nursing and other departments of the institution, administration, 
support service personnel, and clinical site agency personnel. The logistics of student 
placement, contractual agreements, state approval, and accreditation are additional areas 
which are explored. Weekly seminars provide opportunities for exchange of ideas, 



Graduate Curricula 355 



clarification of concerns, and analysis of educational development and evaluative 
strategies. 

Prerequisites: NSG 504, 505, and at least one clinical course 

551 Advanced Pharmacology 3 credits 
Principles of pharmacology are applied to the advanced practice therapeutic management 
of the client across the life span. Emphasis is placed on mechanisms of drug action, 
prescription writing, monitoring drug regimens, identifying adverse reactions/toxicity and 
anticipating changes inherent in self medication. Potential consequences of multiple drug 
interactions are considered. The cost effectiveness of medication choices is also 
discussed. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: NSG 552 

552 Pathophysiology for Advanced Practice Nursing 3 credits 
The physiological principles and pathogenesis of common conditions affecting children 
and adults are presented. The application of concepts from anatomy and physiology, 
pathophysiology and epidemiology as a basis for advanced nursing practice is 
emphasized. Physical findings and diagnostic studies appropriate for common health 
problems occurring across the life span are addressed. 

554 Diagnostic Reasoning and Therapeutic Interventions for Primary Care 3 credits 
This is a laboratory/clinical course designed to assist students to use clinical decision- 
making theory as the foundation for performing clinical interventions. Data collection and 
hypothesis formulation is emphasized. Students practice psychomotor and psychosocial 
therapeutic interventions in a variety of clinical settings. A beginning understanding of the 
role of the family nurse practitioner is stressed. (A minimum of 135 hours of combined 
laboratory and clinical practice are required for this course.) 

Corequisite for FNP students only: NSG 514 

555 Legal, Ethical, and Public Policy Issues in Health Care 3 credits 
This course is designed to analyze the impact of legal, ethical and public policy 
dimensions as they relate to health care in general and nursing specifically. Emphasis will 
be on examination of current issues in these areas. Current trends and issues in health 
care will provide a framework for analyzing the legal, ethical and public policy aspects of 
the health care system. 

556 Primary Care Management of Children's Health 2 credits 
Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive health assessment of 
children. Clinical experiences also will assist students to gain competence in the 
management of children's health/illness status. Students will be guided by a preceptor in 
the implementation of treatment plans or protocols utilized to manage common childhood 
health problems and illnesses. (A minimum of 90 hours of precepted clinical practice is 
required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 565 

557 Care of Adults with Health Promotion Needs and Episodic Health Problems 2 
credits 

Focuses on the delivery of theory-based care to adults with health promotion needs and 
episodic health problems. The application of advanced comprehensive assessment skills 
to the adult population are covered. Emphasis is placed on risk analysis and reduction and 
principles of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic clinical therapeutics. The stabilization 



356 Graduate Curricula 



of acute and management of common episodic health problems of adults are included. In 
addition there are selected practice experiences. 

Prerequisites: NSG 551, NSG 552, NSG 514, *NSG 554 for FNP students only 

558 Primary Care Management of Adults with Health Promotion Needs and Episodic 
Health Problems 2 credits 
Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive health assessment of 
adults with episodic health problems. Clinical experiences also will assist students to gain 
competence in the theory based management of adult's health/illness status. Students will 
be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of treatment plans or protocols utilized to 
manage common adult health problems and illnesses. (A minimum of 90 hours of 
precepted clinical practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 557 

559 Health Care of Women 3 credits 
Emphasis is on gynecological and reproductive health care. Health promotion issues 
specific to women are covered. Focus is on the theory based management of gynecologic 
health needs and the normal reproductive cycle. The application of research findings to 
the health care of women is discussed. 

Prerequisites: NSG 551, NSG 552, NSG 514, *NSG 554 for FNP students only 

561 Primary Care Management of Women's Health 2 credits 
Students will develop competence in comprehensive health assessment of the 
gynecologic and reproductive health care needs of women. Clinical experiences also will 
assist students to gain competence in the theory based management of women's health. 
Students will be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of treatment plans or 
protocols utilized to manage common health concerns of women throughout the life cycle. 
The application of research to practice will be included. (A minimum of 90 hours of 
precepted clinical practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 559 

562 Care of Adults with Chronic Health Needs and Problems 2 credits 
Focuses on the delivery of theory-based care to adults with chronic health problems. The 
ongoing assessment and management of chronic illnesses will be discussed. Students will 
be encouraged to utilize problem solving techniques to determine potential strategies for 
breaking through barriers to care. The utilization of computers to facilitate client care 
objectives will also be covered. Selected practice experiences are included. 

Prerequisites: NSG 551, NSG 552, NSG 514, *NSG 554 for FNP students only 

563 Primary Care Management of Adults with Chronic Health Needs and Problems 2 
credits 

Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive, ongoing health 
assessment of adults with chronic health problems. Clinical experiences also will assist 
students to gain competence in the theory-based management of chronic health problems. 
Students will be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of treatment plans or 
protocols utilized to manage common, stabilized adult chronic health problems and 
illnesses in collaboration with other members of the health care team. (A minimum of 90 
hours of precepted clinical practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 562 



Graduate Curricula 357 



565 Health Care of Children 3 credits 

This course focuses on strategies for the delivery of health care to children and 
adolescents. Comprehensive health assessment of children including health promotion 
needs, growth and development, family and cultural dynamics, physical and psychosocial 
status are covered. Emphasis is placed on clinical therapeutics both pharmacologic and 
non-pharmacologic that are appropriate for the management of children experiencing 
acute and chronic illnesses. Selected practice experiences are included. 

Prerequisites: NSG 551, NSG 552, NSG 514,*NSG 554 for FNP students only 

567 Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical Synthesis 3 credits 

This course serves as the culminating experience in the family nurse practitioner clinical 
specialization. Students work with clinical preceptors in family practice settings to apply 
previously acquired knowledge and skills. This capstone clinical experience focuses on 
demonstration of competency in the areas of: management of client health/illness status; 
nurse-client relationship; teaching-coaching function; professional role; managing and 
negotiating health care delivery systems; and monitoring and ensuring quality of health 
care practices. (A minimum of 135 hours of precepted clinical practice in a family practice 
setting is required for this course.) 

Prerequisite: All courses except NSG 555 

570 Faculty Role Development 3 credits 

This course is designed to develop a full understanding of entry into a faculty position. 
Students will be provided with the opportunity to learn how to initiate a job search, develop 
a dossier for promotion and tenure; implement the educator role as it relates to curriculum 
and evaluation and explore the opportunities for career advancement. 

576 Advanced Nursing Management of Adults with Health Promotion Needs and 
Episodic Health Problems 3 credits 
Students will develop competence in identifying health promotion needs and performing a 
comprehensive health assessment of adults with episodic health problems. Clinical 
experience also will assist students to gain competence in the theory-based management 
of adults' health/illness status. Students will be guided by a preceptor in the 
implementation of clinical paths and/or protocols used in acute care settings to manage 
common adult health problems and illnesses. (A minimum of 90 hours of precepted clinical 
practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 557 

577 Advanced Nursing Management of Adults with Chronic Health Needs and 
Problems 3 credits 
Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive, ongoing health 
assessment of adults with chronic health problems. Clinical experience also will assist 
students to gain competence in the theory-based management of chronic health problems. 
Students will be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of clinical paths or protocols 
used in acute care or long-term settings for clinical management of adult chronic health 
problems and illnesses. Collaboration with other members of the health care team will be 
stressed. (A minimum of 90 hours of precepted clinical practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 562 



358 Graduate Curricula 



578 Advanced Nursing Management of Women with Health Problems and Health 
Promotion Needs 3 credits 
Students will develop competence in comprehensive health assessment of gynecologic, 
obstetric, and reproductive health care needs of women. Clinical experiences also will 
assist students to gain competence in the theory-based management of women's health in 
acute care, ambulatory, and community settings. Students will be guided by a preceptor in 
the implementation of advanced nursing strategies utilized to manage common childhood 
health concerns of women throughout the life cycle. The application of research to practice 
will be emphasized. (A minimum of 90 hours of precepted clinical practice is required for 
this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 559 

579 Advanced Nursing Management of Children with Health Problems and Health 
Promotion Needs 3 credits 
Students will develop competence in performing a comprehensive health assessment of 
children. Clinical experiences also will assist students to gain competence in the 
therapeutic management of children's health/illness status in acute care, ambulatory, and 
community settings. Students will be guided by a preceptor in the implementation of 
advanced nursing strategies utilized to manage common childhood health problems and 
illnesses. (A minimum of 90 hours of precepted clinical practice is required for this course.) 

Corequisite: NSG 565 

590 Special Topics 1-3 credits 
The nursing department features a series of one-two-and three-credit, courses which deal 
with special topics of interest to graduate nursing students. They are taught by respected 
and expert faculty who are leaders in their field. Special Topics may be used as electives 
within the graduate nursing program. 

591 Advanced Practice Nursing Clinical Synthesis 3 credits 
This clinical course serves as a culminating experience in the advanced practice nursing 
clinical sequence for students who will seek certification as clinical specialists. Students 
work with clinical preceptors to integrate and apply previously acquired knowledge and 
skills. The clinical experience focuses on the synthesis of the clinical specialist roles, 
including expert practitioner, case manager, consultant for patient problems and quality 
improvement, staff educator, collaborator, and clinical leader. Emphasis is placed on 
evidence-based practice, the formulation, use, and evaluation of independent nursing 
interventions, and strategies for administration of nursing systems. 

Prerequisites: NSG 576 and 577 or NSG 578 and 579 

596 Independent Study Variable credits 

Allows students to investigate a topic of interest, complete their research, or implement a 
special project with the guidance of a faculty. Topics/projects/thesis must be approved in 
advance. 

599 Graduate Nursing Synthesis Seminar 3 credits 

This course represents the culmination of graduate nursing knowledge and skills. A 
seminar format is used to facilitate students' demonstration of their ability to integrate 
theory, research, and clinical or functional practice. A capstone scholarly project provides 
evidence of students' synthesis of knowledge, written, oral, and critical thinking skills. 

Prerequisites: All courses except the following corequisites NSG 555, NSG 535, NSG 
545, or NSG 567, NSG 591 



Graduate Curricula 359 



Occupational Therapy Post-Professional Programs 

College of Health Sciences 

Degree MS, Occupational Therapy 

Department Chair Grace S. Fisher, EdD, OTR/L 

Coordinator, Post-professional Pediatrics Amy Lynch, MS, OTR/L 

Faculty 

Gwen Bartolacci, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, AS Mount Aloysious College; BS 
University of North Dakota; MS The Pennsylvania State University; OTD Nova Southeastern 
University 

Joseph A. Cipriani, Professor of Occupational Therapy, BA Wilkes University; BS College 
Misericordia; MA Wichita State University; EdD Nova Southeastern University 

Grace S. Fisher, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, BA Wilkes University; Post- 
Baccalaureate Certificate University of Pennsylvania; MS College Misericordia; EdD Temple 
University 

Ellen McLaughlin, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, BS, MS College Misericordia; 
EdD Rutger's University 

Amy Lynch, Coordinator of Post Professional Pediatrics, BS Gettysburg College; MS Tuft's 
University 

Lalit J. Shah, Professor of Occupational Therapy, BS University of Bombay; MS College 
Misericordia; EdD Nova Southeastern University 

Post-professional Master's Degree Program: Goals, Course Sequence, 
Admissions 

Coordinator: Ellen McLaughlin, EdD, OTR/L 

The post-professional master's of science in occupational therapy is a 30-credit graduate 
program with two tracks, an interdisciplinary and pediatric concentration. Students in all tracks 
of the program will complete a total of 30 graduate credits distributed among the following 
categories: theory and core: 9 credits; research: 9 credits; concentration: 12 credits. 

This program is offered in a variety of formats using an adult learning model, including online 
distance education, weekend or night courses, and workshop formats. The pediatric track 
includes courses currently being offered in the post-professional pediatric certificate program. 
This allows students to transfer their graduate credits from the certificate program into the 
post-professional master's degree program. The interdisciplinary track includes courses from a 
variety of departments including education, nursing, and organizational management. 

Curricular goals of the program include: 

1 . The student will be able to foster the most effective interventions when working with 
occupational therapy clientele to promote independence and success in their life roles 
and activities. 

2. The students will advance their knowledge base in specialty areas related to 
occupational therapy and their practice through the choice of four elective courses 
within the MS program. 

3. The student will be able to synthesize their knowledge base in research and evidence 
based practice in order to implement best practice in occupational therapy. 

4. The student will advance their knowledge base in order to integrate and evaluate 
occupational therapy theory in clinical practice. 



360 Graduate Curricula 



Below is a brief overview of the curriculum for the post-professional master's degree in 
occupational therapy. Courses in bold are required of all students. 



Theory and Core 

HP 600 

OT620 

HP 670 
or 

HP 625 
Research 

OT520 

OT690 
or 

OT695 

OT615 
Concentration Courses 



9 credits 
Pediatric Issues/Trends 
Analysis of Theories 
Grant Writing* 

Sensory Integration Treatment and Evaluation 

9 credits 
Research Methods 
Research Project I 

Research Project II 
Evidence-based Practice or HP 670 

12 credits 



Students may choose 12 credits in pediatrics or from the interdisciplinary offerings. 
HP 600 Pediatric Issues/Trends 

or 

OT 630 Issues and Trends 

OT 520 Research Methods 



Education Offerings: 
EDU 

EDU 568 
OT620 
OT690 

or 
OT615 

Nursing Offerings: 
NSG 551 
NSG 555 
NSG 552 
NSG 502 
NSG 505 
HP 670 
OT695 

or 
HP 670 



510 Learning 
Distance Education 
Analysis of Theories 
Research Project 

Evidence Based Practice 

Post-professional Pharmacology 

Legal, Ethical and Public Policy Issues in Health Care 

Pathophysiology for Post-professional Nursing 

Curriculum Design 

Teaching - Learning Strategies 

Grant Writing* 

Research Project II 



Grant Writing* 

Organizational Management Offerings: 

Organizational Behavior 



OM500 
OM509 
OM530 
OM536 
OM535 
OM538 
OM545 



Financial Management 

Legal Aspects of Administration 

Managing Customer Satisfaction 

Leadership 

Perspectives in Management 

Introduction to Human Resources 



Pediatric certificate offerings are listed in the following section. 
* May not be used to satisfy both the Core and Research Requirements 



Graduate Curricula 361 



Admissions Requirements: 

The post-professional master's degree program requires submission of the following 
information for admissions consideration: 

• Official scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). 
These scores must be less than five years old. For students in the pediatric certificate 
program, this requirement will be waived if they have completed at least nine credits of 
the program with a 3.5 or higher GPA 

• NBCOT initial certification as an occupational therapist 

• College/university transcripts from all prior academic work 

• Basic statistics course 

• Undergraduate GPA of 2.8 or higher 

• Statement of professional goals and how matriculation in the post-professional 
master's degree program can contribute to those goals 

• Two letters of reference 

Students taking courses in the pediatric certificate program who wish to move into the post- 
professional master's degree program should apply by the final semester of their 12 credit 
certificate, if they have not completed formal application prior to that point. 

If students are not enrolled in the pediatric certificate program, and they are interested in 
pursuing the master's degree, they must formally apply to the post-professional master's 
degree program after six credits of coursework. 

Students in the post-professional master's degree program must take 30 graduate credits to 
receive the master's of science degree. Credits transferable to this degree must be within the 
following guidelines: 

• all courses transferred in must be formally evaluated by the registrar's office for 
transferability; 

• students who have received an ELM from Misericordia University will automatically 
receive credit for OT520, OT 620 and OT 630. These students must take Grant Writing 
(HP 670) and Evidence-Based Practice (OT 615) as their remaining research 
requirements; and, 

• for students who have not graduated from the ELM at Misericordia University, a 
maximum of six transfer credits will be accepted towards the 30 required for the 
master's of science degree. 

Occupational Therapy Post-Professional Course Descriptions 

(For further interdisciplinary courses, see graduate nursing, organizational management and 
education course descriptions.) 

OT520 Research Design 3 credits 

This course presents the principles and processes involved in research. Qualitative 
and quantitative approaches are reviewed and analyzed relative to their strengths, 
limitations, and practical uses. The application of appropriate research methods to 
problems worthy of study is stressed. The student will complete a research proposal 
as part of this course. 

OT615 Evidence-based Practice 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide an extensive overview of evidence-based practice. 
Students will complete an in-depth evidence-based project related to occupational 
therapy practice. Students will develop a clinical question, gather current published 
evidence, complete a critical review of the evidence, and summarize and present the 
results of the critical appraisal process. 



362 Graduate Curricula 






OT690/695 Research Project I and II 3 credits 

Students will complete a research project that contributes to the knowledge of the 
occupational therapy process; outcome will include a paper acceptable for publication 
in a professional journal. 



Post-Professional Certificate in Pediatrics 

This program is designed to provide learning experiences in pediatric practice for practicing 
occupational and physical therapists using an adult learning model. Students in the program 
must complete four 3-credit graduate courses within a 4-semester time frame. Students can 
take greater than one course per semester, and are encouraged to do so particularly in the 
summer semester. One course is required: Advanced Practice Pediatric Issues and Trends 
(HP 600). This course should be taken in the first semester of enrollment. Students can take 
an additional course at the same time they take this course. Students can enter the program in 
either the summer or fall semesters. Class size is expected to be 12-20 students per course. 

A combination delivery model of face-to-face and distance learning is used. Each course is 
offered in one or both of the following two delivery systems, depending on the best way to 
facilitate learning objectives. The first delivery model is one to four days of on campus 
learning, with the use of distance education tools in between. Misericordia University uses 
Blackboard as the platform for distance education. Training will be provided on how to use this 
fascinating Internet tool. The other delivery mode! includes workshop model, with a five day 
intensive on-campus learning experience. 

Courses that may be applied to the certificate in pediatrics include: Advanced Practice 
Pediatric Issues and Trends (HP 600); Pediatric Evaluation (HP 605), Treatment and 
Evaluation of Pediatric Feeding Issues (HP 615), Sensory Integration Treatment and 
Evaluation (HP 625); School Based Pediatric Occupational and Physical Therapy (HP 635); 
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Issues and Interventions (HP 645); Early Intervention (HP 650); 
Evidence-based Neurodevelopmental Treatment and Evaluation for Children with Central 
Nervous System Dysfunction (HP 655); Autism and Pervasive Developmental Delay: 
Evaluation and Intervention Strategies (HP 660); Seating in Pediatric Practice (HP 665); and, 
Special Topics: Vision Rehabilitation (HP 610). 

Occupational Therapy Post-Professional Course Descriptions 

(For further interdisciplinary courses, see graduate nursing, organizational management and 
education course descriptions.) 

HP600 Advanced Practice Pediatric Issues and Trends 3 credits 

This course is designed to explore the most recent issues and trends in the area of 
pediatric occupational and physical therapy. The course will focus on evidence-based 
practice, mentorship and leadership, and community-based practice within the current 
profession of the student. The students will apply the course content to their clinical and 
professional practice settings through course assignments. It will be offered primarily in a 
distance-learning format with two weekends of on-campus experiences. 

HP605 Pediatric Evaluation 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide students with an intermediate to advanced level 
understanding of the process of pediatric evaluation in occupational therapy. The course 
will focus on the full process of occupational therapy evaluation including referral 
sources, identifying appropriate evaluation tools, clinical observations, standardized 
assessment, report writing, evaluation accommodations, and the reporting of 
assessment results. 



Graduate Curricula 363 



HP610 Special Topics: Vision Rehabilitation 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide the OT or PT with an understanding of the basic 
principles of the visual system and its influences upon daily activities for the pediatric 
patient. The course will discuss pediatric vision problems and appropriate therapies. 
After completing this course students will be able to describe key components of the 
visual system and how they work, understand binocular vision, how it develops and its 
effects on ADL, understand and treat children with binocular vision disorders and gain 
useful strategies for dealing with children who have learning related vision problems. 
This course is intended for OTs and PTs who will be or who are working with the 
pediatric population both in an inpatient/outpatient and/or school environment. 

HP615 Treatment and Evaluation of Pediatric Feeding Issues 3 credits 

This course provides an extensive overview of evaluation and treatment of pediatric 
feeding disorders. The course will focus on oral motor dysfunction, tube-feeding, sensory 
issues, positioning and handling, and behavioral management related to feeding/eating. 
Conditions that affect feeding/eating are explored along with medical and therapeutic 
assessments. The students will apply the course content to their clinical and professional 
practice settings through course assignments. It will be offered in an intensive week-long 
on-campus format. 

HP625 Sensory Integration Treatment and Evaluation 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide an extensive overview of sensory integration theory, 
neurology, evaluation and treatment related to clinical practice for occupational and 
physical therapists. Sensory integration theory is explored in relationship to function and 
occupation. The most relevant evaluations and treatment interventions are presented as 
well as a critical review of effectiveness research in sensory integration. The students 
will apply the course content to their clinical and professional practice settings through 
course assignments. This course is offered in a 4-day intensive course format. 

HP630 Child Development in an International Setting 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to expand clinical knowledge in the 
areas of early childhood development, psycho-emotional development, and program 
development, including community needs assessments. The course content and 
learning will occur in a service-learning format, in which students will travel with faculty 
outside the United States for the primary portion of the course. The most relevant issues 
in promoting development for institutionalized and post institutionalized children as well 
as family training for foster care providers are presented with reflection upon existing 
evidence within the fields of occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech language 
pathology, nursing, psychology, and neurodevelopment. The students will apply the 
course content to their clinical and professional practice settings through course 
assignments. This course is offered with an online launch, a 10-14 day intensive in- 
country experience, and closes with online course activities. 

Prerequisite: Application and acceptance into this course is required. 

HP635 School Based Pediatric OT & PT 3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with intermediate level knowledge 
related to the provision of best practice occupational therapy services within the 
educational environment. Practices particularly relevant to the school setting in terms of 
assessment, individualized educational planning, intervention, re-assessment and 
discharge will be discussed. Additional course topics will include legislation, service 
provision models, evidence-based practice in the schools, consultation, effective 
teaming, and advocacy. 



364 Graduate Curricula 



HP645 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Issues and Interventions 3 credits 

This course provides an overview of the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) including 
common conditions, technology, personnel, and the environment. It also addresses the 
most common issues surrounding the NICU, along with occupational and physical 
therapy strategies for intervention and evaluation. It will be offered primarily in a 
distance-learning format with two weekends of in-class experiences. These weekends 
will involve a visit to a NICU. 

HP650 Early Intervention 3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to implement the occupational 
therapy process with children who are from birth to three years of age and to be 
knowledgeable about factors that affect service delivery. In-class exercises and out-of- 
class assignments will be provided to improve students' skills and increase students' self 
confidence with the new content of the course. 

HP655 Evidence-based Neurodevelopmental Treatment & Evaluation for Children with 
Central Nervous System Dysfunction 3 credits 

This is a treatment course for children with neurological deficits (cerebral palsy) based 
on the work of Berta Bobath, MCSP, Karel Bobath, MD, Mary B. Quinton, MCSP, OBE 
and Elsbeth Kong, MD. Therapy skills to be developed and refined will include 
observation and analysis of typical and atypical child development, hands-on facilitation 
and stimulation of more effective movement, and inhibition of unwanted movement 
patterns. This will require the testing of three children at the beginning and end of an 
intervention period, using the Movement Assessment of Children. Other evaluation 
methods may also be used. The course will include distance learning, on-site sessions 
for learning and practice of treatment techniques, and a required commitment of a 
minimum of 12 hours of treatment for each of three children with neurological deficits. 

Prerequisites: This course is open to licensed occupational therapists and physical 
therapists. In order to integrate the information that the therapist will acquire it will be 
necessary to have access to appropriate children for treatment. Participants will need 
to assess and treat three children with cerebral palsy, at least one of whom is 
ambulatory. 

HP660 Autism and Pervasive Developmental Delay: Evaluation and Intervention 

Strategies 3 credits 

This course is designed for practicing occupational and physical therapists interested in 
learning more about autism and pervasive developmental delay. The instructors will 
guide participants to an understanding of complexities of these disorders, and evaluation 
and treatment of individuals with autism or PDD diagnosis. Causal factors, evaluative 
procedures, and treatment will be thoroughly explored. Specific attention will be given to 
motor planning, sensory modulation, and tactile discrimination disorders and their 
treatments. Through selected readings, case presentations, and discussions, the 
participants will become more proficient in prioritizing the underlying problems and 
designing holistic therapeutic interventions. 

HP665 Seating in Pediatric Practice 3 credits 

This course will assist treating clinicians in increasing their knowledge and skills when 
using seating strategies for their children. Seating needs for children include safe 
passive transport within the community and their environment, adequate support for 
eating, as well as support for independent postural control for task participation. This 
course will focus on all the needs for seating, including seating needed for postural 
management of the child, as well as seating for the child's development of postural 
control. 



Graduate Curricula 365 



HP670 Grant Writing 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide an extensive overview of the grant writing process. 
Students will learn how to identify a funding need, develop a case for support, and 
research potential funding opportunities. The student will develop a comprehensive grant 
proposal that directly responds to an identified funding opportunity. The various 
components of a grant proposal are explored, including the introduction, problem 
statement, objectives, methodology, evaluation, budget, and summary sections. 
Strategies for persuasive writing techniques are presented. 

OT520 Research Design 3 credits 

This course presents the principles and processes involved in research. Qualitative and 
quantitative approaches are reviewed and analyzed relative to their strengths, 
limitations, and practical uses. The application of appropriate research methods to 
problems worthy of study is stressed. The student will complete a research proposal as 
part of this course. 

OT615 Evidence-based Practice 3 credits 

This course is designed to provide an extensive overview of evidence-based practice. 
Students will complete an in-depth evidence-based project related to occupational 
therapy practice. Students will develop a clinical question, gather current published 
evidence, complete a critical review of the evidence, and summarize and present the 
results of the critical appraisal process. 

OT690/695 Research Project I and II 3 credits 

Students will complete a research project that contributes to the knowledge of the 
occupational therapy process; outcome will include a paper acceptable for publication in 
a professional journal. 

Post-professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy 

OT Doctoral Program Coordinator: Ellen McLaughlin, EdD, OTR/L 

The Occupational Therapy Department at Misericordia University is recognized as an 
educational leader in the occupational therapy professional community. As one of the first 
academic institutions to offer an entry level masters degree the department also offers 
innovative post professional pediatric programs and a weekend college program. The OTD 
degree continues this future oriented perspective integral to our new university status. The 
degree is designed to provide occupational therapists with advanced clinical, practice 
management, teaching, and administrative skills. The program emphasizes integration of 
theory and practice, professional and clinical skills, critical self-assessment, clinical reasoning 
and decision-making skills, advocacy and health policy. The post professional program is 
designed to enhance the knowledge and skills that practitioners bring from clinical practice 
and life experiences. Program graduates should qualify for upper level management 
positions in a diverse range of practice environments and will be poised to become leaders in 
the profession. 

Geriatric Care Manager Elective Specialization Courses for OTD students 
Courses that may be completed in the Geriatric Care Manager Specialization track include 
GCM 500- Geriatric Care Management I, GCM 501- Geriatric Care Management II, GCM 505 
Anatomy and Physiology of Aging , GCM 515- Geriatric AssessmentGCM 520- Ethics of 
Aging. 



366 Graduate Curricula 



Pediatric Elective Specialization Courses for OTD Students 
Courses that may be applied to the certificate in pediatrics include: Advanced Practice 
Pediatric Issues and Trends (HP 600); Pediatric Evaluation (HP 605), Treatment and 
Evaluation of Pediatric Feeding Issues (HP 615), Sensory Integration Treatment and 
Evaluation (HP 625); School Based Pediatric Occupational and Physical Therapy (HP 635); 
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Issues and Interventions (HP 645); Early Intervention (HP 650); 
Evidence-based Neurodevelopmental Treatment and Evaluation for Children with Central 
Nervous System Dysfunction (HP 655); Autism and Pervasive Developmental Delay: 
Evaluation and Intervention Strategies (HP 660); Seating in Pediatric Practice (HP 665); and, 
Special Topics: Vision Rehabilitation (HP 610). These courses are described under the Post 
Professional Pediatric Certificate Program. 



Post-Professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy- Curriculum, Goals, 
Admission Criteria 

Curriculum and Program Delivery 

The OTD curriculum is composed of 24 credits of core courses that address the competencies 
required of leaders and advocates in the profession. These courses address advanced theory, 
advanced research, program development and evaluation, occupational science, and public 
policy and advocacy. Capstone coursework requires the integration of these content areas into 
a clinical project, which is formally evaluated and presented through professional presentation 
and/or publication. Each student also completes 9-12 credits in either a pediatric or geriatric 
specialization, for a total of 33-36 credits for the doctoral coursework. A combination delivery 
model of face-to-face and distance learning is used. Classes meet on campus one weekend 
day at the beginning and end of each semester. The program is designed to be completed 
part-time (2 classes per semester) over a two year tri-semester period. A one year full-time 
option is available. 

Program Goals 

The OTD program goals are focused in areas of research, advanced practice, 
leadership and administration. Graduates will: 

1. be proficient in critically appraising, applying and contributing to evidence that 
supports occupation-based practice. 

2. synthesize and apply advanced theoretical concepts and clinical skills in selected 
areas of practice. 

3. enhance their leadership and advocacy skills to promote occupational participation in 
light of human dynamics and private and public policy influences. 

4. design and administer effective, fiscally responsible client-centered programs. 

Admissions 
Admission criteria are: 

Minimum of a bachelor's degree in occupational therapy 

Minimum of 1 year practicing as a licensed occupational therapist 

Completed application including official transcripts, three references, statement of 
professional goals, GRE 

Minimum GPA of 3.0 in graduate studies 

Interview 



Graduate Curricula 367 



Accepted students may begin the post-professional OTD program during any fall, spring, or 
summer semester. The preferred deadlines for application and supporting documentation are 
as follows: 

October 1 for Spring Semester (January - May) 
February 1 for Summer Semester (May - August) 
May 1 for Fall Semester (August - December) 
To apply for admission, students must submit the following: 

Online application form 

$60 application fee 

Application statement of purpose and practice goals 

Current Resume 

Official transcripts for occupational therapy education 

Copy of NBCOT certification 

Copy of current state license/certification in a US jurisdiction 

Official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score with a minimum of 550 
(213 if computer generated). 

Three letters of recommendation (one recommendation must be from a licensed 
occupational therapist). 

Applicants must apply online. 

Post-professional Doctor of Occupational Therapy Course Sequence 

BS Degree Holders 

An applicant who holds a baccalaureate degree in OT must have Statistics as a pre-requisite and 
will complete 60 hours as outlined below. 

Pre OTD Year 

First Semester-Summer Total Credits 9 

OT 520 Research Methods 3 

OT 630 lssues& Trends 3 

Graduate Elective 3 

Second Semester-Fall Total Credits 9 Third Semester-Spring Total Credits 9 

OT570 Management 3 OT 695 Research Project II 3 

OT 690 Research Project I 3 Graduate Elective 3 

Graduate Elective 3 Gaduate Elective 3 

OTD Year 1 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 620 Advanced Theory 3 OTD 640 Designing, Implementing 3 

OTD 641 Evidence Based Practice 3 and Evaluation Quality 

Programs 
Specialization Class 3 



368 Graduate Curricula 



Third Semester-Summer 
OTD 625 



Total Credits 6 
3 



Supporting Practice 

through Public Policy and 

Advocacy 

Specialization Class 3 



OTD Year 2 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 

OTD 642 Advanced Research 3 

Specialization Class 3 



Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 643 Education, 3 

Presentation and 
Publication 

OTD 644 Occupational Science 3 



Third Semester-Summer Total Credits 3 
OTD 650 Capstone Course 3 



BS and Post Professional Masters in OT 

An applicant who holds a baccalaureate degree in occupational therapy and a post professional 
masters degree in occupational therapy or a related field must have the equivalent of OT 520, 690 
and 695 as determined by the research coordinator as prerequisites and complete 33 credits as 
outlined below: 



Yearl 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 

OTD 620 Advanced Theory 3 

OTD 641 Evidence Based Practice 3 



Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 640 Designing, Implementing 3 

and Evaluation Quality 
Programs 
Specialization Class 3 



Third Semester-Summer Total Credits 6 

OTD 625 Supporting Practice 3 

through Public Policy and 
Advocacy 
Specialization Class 3 



Year 2 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 

OTD 642 Advanced Research 3 

Specialization Class 3 



Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 643 Education, 3 

Presentation and 
Publication 

OTD 644 Occupational Science 3 



Third Semester-Summer Total Credits 3 

OTD 650 Capstone Course 3 

* Misericordia University Post Professional Master Degree holders may transfer up to 6 
credits. 



Graduate Curricula 369 



Entry Level Masters in OT 

An applicant who holds an ELM Degree in Occupational Therapy must have the equivalent of OT 
520, 690 and 695 as determined by the research coordinator as prerequisites and complete 33 
credits* as outlined below: 



YeaM 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 

OTD 620 Advanced Theory 3 

OTD 641 Evidence Based Practice 3 



Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 640 Designing, Implementing 3 

and Evaluation Quality 
Programs 
Specialization Class 3 



Third Semester-Summer Total Credits 6 

OTD 625 Supporting Practice 3 

through Public Policy and 
Advocacy 
Specialization Class 3 



Year 2 

First Semester-Fall Total Credits 6 

OTD 642 Advanced Research 3 

Specialization Class 3 



Second Semester-Spring Total Credits 6 

OTD 643 Education, 3 

Presentation and 
Publication 

OTD 644 Occupational Science 3 



Third Semester-Summer Total Credits 3 
OTD 650 Capstone Course 3 

Current Entry Level Masters Students at Misericordia 

An applicant enrolled in the ELM program at Misericordia University may apply for entry into the 
OTD program in September of the senior year. Acceptance will be determined by November of 
that year. 30 credits * will be completed as outlined below after awarding of MS degree and 
NBCOT certification as an occupational therapist 



First Semester-Summer Total Credits 6 

OTD 625 Supporting Practice 3 

through Public Policy and 
Advocacy 
Specialization Class 3 



Second Semester-Fall Total Credits 9 

OTD 620 Advanced Theory 3 

OTD 641 Evidence Based Practice 3 
OTD 642 Advanced Research 3 



Third Semester-Spring Total Credits 9 

OTD 640 Designing, Implementing 3 
and Evaluation Quality 
Programs 

OTD 643 Education, Presentation 3 
and Publication 

OTD 644 Occupational Science 3 



Final Semester - Summer Total Credits 6 
OTD 650 Capstone Course 3 

Specialization Class 3 

*One specialization class must be completed 
as a graduate elective in the spring semester 
of year 4. Students will receive credit for 
Advanced Theory if they have taken it as part 
of their master's curriculum at Misericordia. 



370 Graduate Curricula 



Capstone Project 

The capstone project is a credited course, OTD 650. Students will submit a proposal for a 
capstone project in the Fall or Spring semester of their final year. The level of independent 
study and initiative required by the student for both capstone development and implementation 
will be high. It is an integrative piece, with the goal of producing an outcome that demonstrates 
their ability to apply advanced clinical proficiency in their specialization area. It is a true 
integration of the four program objectives. Guidance for capstone proposal development will 
be provided on an online tutorial, and proposals will be approved by a committee of the 
faculty. Students will be assigned a capstone facilitator who will serve as the contact person 
and mentor throughout the capstone project. Each capstone course section will include one 
faculty facilitator and up to five doctoral students. Students will be required to come to campus 
to present their capstone project, once completed. 

Occupational Therapy Post-Professional Course Descriptions 

(For further interdisciplinary courses, see graduate nursing, organizational management and 
education course descriptions.) 

620 Advanced Theory 3 credits 

This course will examine the current and classic literature as it pertains to theory 
development and analysis and its relationship to macro and micro models, and 
comparative analysis of frames of reference for practice and research. There will be 
consideration of both basic and applied knowledge as it pertains to the study of 
occupational therapy as an applied science and the science of occupation as an 
academic discipline. This course will be offered in a combination ton-campus launch 
and distance online learning format. Fall semester 

625 Supporting Practice through Public Policy and Advocacy 3 credits 

Students will analyze current state and federal public policy issues and the impact on 
the delivery of occupational therapy services. Students will develop knowledge 
related to public policy formation and acquire advanced skills in advocacy. This 
course will be offered in a combination of on-campus meetings and distance online 
learning. Spring semester 

640 Designing, Implementing and Evaluating Quality Programs 3 credits 
Through didactic and problem based learning, students will explore program 
assessment tools and complete needs assessments. Students will learn the value of 
developing a program mission, strategic plan, and operational tactics in the 
development of a successful allied health based program. Students will gain 
knowledge about budgeting, marketing, and revenue sources in order to ensure their 
developed program is underscored with financial responsibility. This course will be 
offered in a combination of on campus meetings and distance online learning. Fall 
semester 

641 Evidence-based Practice 3 credits 
Students will demonstrate knowledge of evidence-based practice and complete an in- 
depth evidence-based project related to occupational therapy practice. Students will 
develop a clinical question (relevant and applicable to their area of practice or 
specialization), gather current published evidence, complete a critical review of the 
evidence, summarize and present the results of the critical appraisal process. This 
course will be offered in a combination on-campus launch and distance online 
learning format. Fall semester 



Graduate Curricula 371 



642 Advanced Research 3 credits 
The doctorally trained clinician in occupational therapy must have a solid 
understanding of not only research basics, but how to use that knowledge to solve 
problems in their clinical practice. This course will provide educational experiences 
that foster advanced knowledge and application of research principles in both the 
quantitative and qualitative paradigms to the clinician's practice areas. Summer 
semester 

643 Education, Presentation and Publication 3 credits 

Students will develop professional skills related to providing well constructed 
educational sessions, promoting occupational therapy. 

644 Occupational Science 3 credits 
Occupational science, also known as occupationology, is the study of occupation. 
Occupation is "all 'doing' that has intrinsic and extrinsic meaning" (Wilcock, p. 257). 
The occupational therapy profession is becoming increasingly reliant on occupational 
science as a cornerstone of research and knowledge which justifies the use of 
occupation in therapeutic intervention. The purpose of this course is to provide 
knowledge of the history, evolution, and current state of the occupational science 
discipline and how occupational science can be used as a framework for 
occupational therapy assessment and intervention. Spring semester 

650 Capstone Course 3 credits 

This course design engages doctoral students to advance their clinical reasoning and 
competence in a pre-identified, specialized area of practice. Through participation in 
this course, students will be able to identify the most relevant issues impacting the 
role of occupational therapy in their designated specialty area. They will complete 
readings in relevant literature, engage in communication exchanges with a 
professional leader in their identified area, and conclude their capstone project with a 
product reflecting the extent of their learning. Students will be assigned a faculty 
capstone advisor and participate in mandatory online modules embedded throughout 
the course to help guide the student during their capstone experience. Summer 
semester 



Organizational Management 

College of Professional Studies and Social Sciences 
Degree MS, Organizational Management 
Department Chair Fred J. Croop, MBA, CMA, CPA 
Program Director Corina Mihai, PhD 

Philosophy 

The master of science degree in organizational management educates individuals for 
successful careers as managers in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in both public and 
private spheres. The program reflects a management perspective, which assumes that the 
professional manager is able to analyze problems, synthesize solutions, communicate 
decisions and understand the organizational impact of those decisions. 

Program 

The program prepares students for responsible organizational leadership. Faculty encourages 
students to think deeply and broadly from a systems viewpoint about the roles, functions, and 
tasks of a manager and to develop and use a variety of management skills and prescriptions in 



372 Graduate Curricula 



organizational environments. The program stresses not only management theory, but also the 
application of that theory in various managerial situations. 

Admission Criteria 

Full Admission - Applicants are eligible for full admission to the graduate program if they either 
have a GPA higher than 2.79 or a score on the MAT or GRE of at least the 35th percentile. 

Provisional Admission - Applicants who have a GPA of less than 2.80 and a score between the 
25th and 34th percentile inclusively on the MAT or GRE are eligible to be granted provisional 
admission. Students in this category will be required to complete up to 12 graduate credits, 
half of which must be in required courses, with grades no lower than B before being granted 
full and unconditional admission. 

Alternative Evaluation - Applicants can request evaluation for admission through an alternative 
method. Details are available from the program director. 

Denied Admission - Applicants who have less than a 2.80 GPA in their undergraduate studies 
and score below the 25th percentile on the MAT or GRE will be denied admission. 

Curriculum 

The program consists of 36 credits of study that can be completed on a part-time basis. Students 
must complete a core curriculum of 24 credits and a specialization area of 12 credits. 

Core Courses (24 Credits) 

OM 500 Organizational Behavior 

OM 509 Financial Management , 

OM 515 Research Methods or OM 516 Qualitative Research 

OM 530 Legal Aspects of Administration 

OM 538 Perspectives in Management or OM 595 Professional Contribution or 

OM 596 Administrative Practicum 
OM 545 Introduction to Human Resources (IT substitutes OM 520 Introduction 

to Management Information Systems) 
OM 551 Organizational Communication 

OM 586 Strategic Planning and Management of Change (IT substitutes OM 587 

MIS Policy and Management of Technology) 

Specializations 

The program offers an opportunity for students to concentrate their elective courses in one of 
four areas of special interest: human resource management, management, information 
technology management or marketing. 



Track I: Human Resource Management (12 Credits) 

Clearly a need exists for the development of professional competencies and skills in human 
resource management that deal with management issues that arise or relate to the people- 
side of the organization. The program provides opportunities to develop skills and a knowledge 
base necessary to exert effective leadership in the management of human resources in a 
variety of organizational settings including corporations; health and health-related facilities; 
local, regional, and state governments; and other complex organizations. 



Graduate Curricula 373 



Required courses 

OM 552 Regulation of Human Resource Management 

Elective 
Choose any two 
OM 527 Selection, Recruitment, and Training and Development 

OM 557 Performance, Compensation, and Reward Systems 

OM 558 Employee Relations and Services 



Track II: Management (12 Credits) 

The management specialization provides students with opportunities to acquire and practice 
the functions of management and to understand the characteristics of leadership, particularly 
within for-profit private and publicly traded organizations. 

Required courses 

OM 535 Leadership 

Elective 
Choose any two 
OM 520 Introduction to Management Information Systems 

OM 533 Managing Customer Satisfaction 

OM 536 Marketing Management 



Track III: Information Technology Management (12 Credits) 

Information and the technology that supports it are valuable resources to organizations. Their 
proper management is critical for organizational success. The Information Technology 
Management specialization provides conceptual and skill-based components in both 
technological and managerial areas that allow graduates to meet the increasing information 
needs of organizations. 

Required courses 

OM 571 Data Base Management Systems 

OM 573 Systems Analysis and Design 

OM 575 Data and Computer Communications 

OM 577 Special Topics in Information Technology Management 



Track IV: Marketing 

The marketing specialization meets the educational needs of adults working in industry by 
emphasizing the social and behavioral dimensions of marketing, as well as focusing on a deep 
understanding of marketing as a necessary business function. 

Required courses 

OM 536 Marketing Management 

OM 562 Consumer Advertising and Promotion 

OM 564 Consumer and Marketing Research 

OM 566 Relationship and Service Marketing 



374 Graduate Curricula 



Cluster Programs 

The program offers its degree with a management specialization in a cluster format at various 
sites in the region. The cluster concept advances students through the program as a cohort, 
meeting one weekend a month for 24 months. Further information on the cluster programs is 
available from the Center for Adult and Continuing Education or from the organizational 
management program director. 

Certificate 

The program offers a 15-credit certificate in human resource management to those individuals 
who are interested in the field of human resources, but do not wish to pursue the degree. 
Course requirements for entering and completing the certificate program include: 

1 . a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in a field compatible 
with the area of advanced study; 

2. completion of the following designated courses: OM 500, OM 545, OM 552; and, 

3. completion of six additional credits from the human resource management 
specialization. 

Second Specialization 

Graduates of the organizational management program can return to Misericordia University to 
complete a second specialization by taking the required courses within the specialization area 
at a reduced tuition rate. The specialization requires the completion of a minimum of 12 credit 
hours of course work. Those interested should contact the Center for Adult and Continuing 
Education. ' 

Medical Imaging and Organizational Management Option 

This five-year program for medical imaging majors culminates with a bachelor of science 
degree in medical imaging and a master of science degree in organizational management. 
Those interested should refer to the undergraduate section for further details on the program. 

Course Scheduling and Sequence 
Fall Semesters 



Wee knights 


OM500 


OM509 


OM530 


OM536 


OM527 


OM562 


OM573 


OM575 


Weekend Clusters 


OM500 


OM551 


OM509 


OM586 



Organizational Behavior 

Financial Management 

Legal Aspects of Administration 

Marketing Management 

Selection, Recruitment, and Training 

Consumer Advertising and Promotion 

Systems Analysis and Design (Odd Years) 

Data and Computer Communications (Even Years) 



Organizational Behavior 
Organizational Communication 

Hazleton 

Financial Management 

Strategic Planning and the Management of Change 



Graduate Curricula 375 



Even Years 
OM535 
OM538 

OM520 
OM533 

Online Cluster 
Odd Years 
OM530 
OM545 
Even Years 
OM515 
OM533 

Spring Semesters 

Weeknights 

OM551 
OM515 
OM520 
OM538 
OM552 
OM557 
OM564 
OM573 
OM587 

Weekend Clusters 
Odd Years 
OM536 
OM586 

OM500 
OM551 
Even Years 
OM545 
OM530 

OM538 
OM515 

Online Cluster 
Odd Years 

OM500 

OM551 
Even Years 

OM520 

OM535 



On Campus 

Leadership 

Perspectives in Management 

Hazleton 

Introduction to Management Information Systems 

Managing Customer Satisfaction 



Legal Aspects of Administration 

Introduction to Human Resource Management 

Research Methods 

Managing Customer Satisfaction 



Organizational Communication 

Research Methods 

Introduction to Management Information Systems 

Perspectives in Management 

Regulation of Human Resource Management 

Performance, Compensation, and Reward Systems 

Consumer and Marketing Research 

Systems Analysis and Design (odd years) 

MIS Policy and Management of Technology (even years) 

On Campus 

Marketing Management 

Strategic Planning and Management of Change 

Hazleton 

Organizational Behavior 

Organizational Communication 

On Campus 

Introduction to Human Resources 

Legal Aspects of Administration 

Hazleton 

Perspectives in Management 

Research Methods 



Organizational Behavior 
Organizational Communication 

Introduction to Management Information Systems 
Leadership 



376 Graduate Curricula 



Summer Semesters 



Weeknights 

OM533 
OM535 
OM545 
OM558 
OM566 
OM577 
OM586 

Weekend Clusters 
Odd Years 
OM515 
OM533 

OM545 
OM530 
Even Years 
OM509 
OM520 



OM535 
OM536 

Online Cluster 
Odd Years 

OM509 
OM538 
Even Years 
OM536 
OM586 



Managing Customer Satisfaction 

Leadership 

Introduction to Human Resources 

Employee Relations and Services 

Relationship and Service Marketing 

Special Topics in Information Technology Management 

Strategic Planning 

On Campus 

Research Methods 

Managing Customer Satisfaction 

Hazleton 

Introduction to Human Resources 

Legal Aspects of Administration 

On Campus 

Financial Management 

Introduction to Management Information Systems 

Hazleton 

Leadership < 

Marketing Management 



Financial Management 
Perspectives in Management 

Marketing Management 
Strategic Planning 






Organizational Management Course Descriptions (OM) 

500 Organizational Behavior 3 credits 

Social and behavioral science approaches to the study of human activity in organizations 
are studied. The course is designed to equip administrators with skills for managing 
interactions, differences, and relationships in organizational settings. 

505 Decision Making 3 credits 

A study of decision-making in complex human service organizations is the basis of this 
course. Examination of a variety of conceptual frameworks to enable administrators to 
develop an evaluative design for ethical, effective, and efficient decision making is 
included. 

509 Financial Management 3 credits 

This course is an introduction to the financial system and its relationship to the financing 
of business activities. The course emphasizes areas dealing with corporate financing 
decisions such as time value of money, security valuation, financial statement analysis, 
and financial forecasting. 



Graduate Curricula 377 



510 Financial Management I 3 credits 
This course is an introduction to basic economic theory, accounting principles, budget 
theory and practice, and financial control procedures necessary to the successful 
manager. Designed for the non-financial manager and presupposes little or no previous 
education or experience in finance. 

511 Financial Management II 3 credits 
This course applies the basic skills mastered in Financial Management I through case 
studies of public and private organizations. Emphasis on integrating financial 
considerations with other management considerations when analyzing and solving 
problems, and in planning. Investments, borrowing, information systems, and financial 
analysis are covered. 

Prerequisite: OM 510 

512 Management Science 3 credits 
Management Science is concerned with providing advice, analysis, and support to 
decision makers based on a scientific approach and looking systematically at goals, 
scarce resources, and decision implementation. This course provides students with a 
conceptual understanding of the role that management science plays in the decision- 
making process, introduces students to procedures used to solve problems, and 
explores the procedures to review and interpret management literature and to determine 
the characteristics of quality research in the field of management. 

515 Research Methods 3 credits 

Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques 
associated with the investigation of specific research problems in organizational behavior 
and management. 

516 Introduction to Qualitative Research 3 credits 
This course introduces the student to the nature and importance of qualitative research. 
Case study, grounded theory, historical and ethnographic methods are explored. 
Examples of qualitative research are analyzed, especially program evaluation. 

520 Introduction to Management Information Systems 3 credits 

Review and application of basic computer concepts, methods, and information systems 
techniques that contribute to business decision making and organizational performance. 
Topics include operating systems and hardware, graphics, desktop publishing, analysis 
and design, databases, communications, decision support systems, and artificial 
intelligence and robotics. 

525 Human Services Systems 3 credits 

An integrated seminar that examines the programs and policies of the major human 
service areas, with emphasis on the dynamics of the system as it evolves. Topics for 
discussion include aging, adult services, children and youth, drugs and alcohol, and 
health, mental health/mental retardation. 

527 Selection, Recruitment, and Training/Development 3 credits 

An in-depth examination of the recruitment and selection process and the training and 
development function. The course develops the key relationships among recruitment, 
selection and training/development of employees and explores the impact these 
functions have on organizational competitiveness and success. The course emphasizes 
the importance of proper recruitment, selection and training/development. 



3 78 Graduate Curricula 






530 Legal Aspects of Administration 3 credits 

This course provides students with an understanding of legal aspects of administrative 
action that includes the sources and scope of administrative authority and the function of 
the legal process. Case method of decision analysis is utilized, supplemented by lecture 
and discussion. 

533 Managing Customer Satisfaction 3 credits 

This course is a detailed analysis of the value chain concept and the essential 
interrelationships among logistics, production and operations, specification preparation, 
bid analysis, and vendor analysis. Emphasis is on how total integration of these 
concepts leads to customer satisfaction. 

535 Leadership 3 credits 
This course is an analysis of the effectiveness of various leadership styles on a 
continuum from authoritarian to participative. Emphasis will be on the impact of style on 
productivity, morale, commitment, and achievement of strategies and goals. 

536 Marketing Management 3 credits 
An analytical approach to the study of marketing issues. Focus is on influence of the 
market place and the marketing environment, on decision making in regard to the 
determination of the organization's services, fee structures, channels and strategies of 
communication and the organization's system for planning and controlling its marketing 
effort. 

538 Perspectives in Management 3 credits 

This course focuses on the changing nature of management in response to new 
challenges in the internal and external managerial environment. Emphasis is placed on 
the problem-solving aspects of the managerial process. Special areas include 
globalization of the decision-making/problem-solving process, motivation for 
performance, and fostering an atmosphere for innovation and creativity. 

540 Grant/Contract Development and Management 3 credits 
Systematic approach to the mechanics, techniques, and issues involved in external 
funding. Covers the pre-application phase, the application phase, the post-application 
phase, and the administration phase of grant/contract development and management. 

541 Not-For-Profit Management 3 credits 
An examination of the management principles and practices as particularly applied to the 
not-for-profit sector. Topics include board relations, staff effectiveness, fund-raising, 
marketing, financial information systems, management information systems, 
governmental relations, legal resources, and use of consultants. 

542 Fund-raising: Theory and Application 3 credits 
This course is designed for the current or prospective administrator. Focus is on 
mechanics of fund-raising, the tools of the fund-raiser, and the types of fund-raising 
activities applicable to both public and private sectors. This course considers the role of 
institutional development in the 1990s. 

543 Assessment in Not-For-Profit Organizations 3 credits 
This course is an introduction to the purposes and practices of program assessment and 
evaluation with special emphasis on the not-for-profit sector. Topics include: purpose of 
evaluation; evaluation planning; techniques of evaluation; need, process and outcomes 
evaluation; and effective application of findings. 



Graduate Curricula 379 



545 Introduction to Human Resource Management 3 credits 

This course is an introduction to human resource management. It provides a broad 
overview in such areas as history and definition of the human resource process, human 
resource management functions, recurring themes in human resource management 
including issues of protected classes such as women and the disabled, alternative views, 
and current and future challenges in the field. 

550 Personnel and Labor Relations 3 credits 
Basic concepts, issues, and practices involved in personnel administration and labor 
relations are studied. Emphasis on the successful management of human resources. 

551 Organizational Communication 3 credits 
This course is designed to develop skills in communication to promote organizational 
goal setting, coherence, and effective teamwork. 

552 Regulation of Human Resource Management 3 credits 
This course is an examination of the legal environment of the workplace and its impact 
on the human resource function. Compliance with state and federal laws and regulations 
will be emphasized. It offers an overview of the statutory scheme regulating employment 
and labor relations, presented primarily through pertinent statutes and their judicial 
interpretation (case law). Topics include, but are not limited to, issues of discrimination in 
the workplace, labor relations, health and safety issues, and employment standards. 

553 Fundamentals of Employment Benefit Planning 3 credits 
This course is an in-depth study of the evolution and development of employee benefit 
programs. Current practices and their applicability to various organizations is examined. 

554 Current Issues in Human Resource Management 3 credits 
This seminar, designed for the study of timely and significant issues in human resource 
management, examines current trends and relevant problem-solving techniques in 
human resource management. 

555 Administration of Human Resources 3 credits 
This course examines the theory, policy, and process issues in employment 
relationships including specific practices in selection, appraisal, compensation and 
discipline as they relate to conceptual views of management. 

556 Policy/Procedure Development in Human Resource Management 3 credits 
This course studies the development and implementation of policies relevant to human 
resource administration. Focus is on the relationship between government policy and 
corporate policy and influence of management philosophy for policy planning. Discussion 
on expected and unexpected outcomes of policy decisions is included. 

557 Performance, Compensation, and Reward Systems 3 credits 
This course explores the performance appraisal function and process and its linkage to 
compensation system development, including performance-based pay and benefits (total 
compensation strategies), and to reward systems. 

Prerequisite: OM 545 



380 Graduate Curricula 









558 Employee Relations and Services 3 credits 
The course examines employee relation issues including management systems and 
procedures, job design, work environment, and growth and development. Additionally, 
students study employee services ranging from employee assistance programs and 
counseling to child and elder care. 

559 Special Topics in Human Resource Management 3 credits 
This course is an examination of selected topics relevant to human resource 
management. Possible topics include training and staff development, employee 
assistance programming, governmental relations strategies, time management, and 
effective supervision. 

562 Consumer Advertising and Promotion 3 credits 

This course is a comprehensive study of the theory and practical applications of 
consumer advertising and sales promotion, as part of an integrated marketing 
communications strategy. Students identify various elements utilized by consumers to 
achieve tactical and strategic buying decisions. Relationship-building and ethical issues 
are addressed. 

564 Consumer and Marketing Research 3 credits 

This course concentrates on the fundamental research methods: hypothesis statements, 
the survey process, data analysis, conclusions and presentation of research results. 
Research emphasis is placed on consumer buying decision-making. 

566 Relationship and Service Marketing , 3 credits 

This course examines key concepts, theories, applications, and theoretical and 
conceptual paradigms, including global viewpoints to develop relationship marketing 
organizational designs. By stressing the importance of cooperation and collaboration 
with suppliers and customers, relationship marketing emerges as the core of all 
marketing activity. 

571 Database Management Systems 3 credits 

This course studies methodologies for logical and physical database design; entity- 
relationship diagrams and their mapping to database schemes. This course covers data 
base concepts, data base architecture, data modeling, data dictionaries, data base 
administration, data security and SQL (structured query language) normalization, query 
optimization, as well as form and report design, commercial DBMS products, 
concurrency, recovery, and security. Using Oracle or MS Access or other DBMS, 
students are responsible for creating an authentic database. Even years 

573 System Analysis and Design 3 credits 

The course provides in-depth coverage of the tools, techniques and methodologies for 
information systems analysis and design. Other topics include client/server computing, 
software process management, and software quality management. Students are 
expected to undertake an authentic, real-world, systems-analysis-and-design project. 
Odd years 

575 Data and Computer Communications 3 credits 

The course provides a comprehensive view of data and computer communications and 
examines fundamental concepts in telecommunications and networking. Topics include 
network technologies and services, with an emphasis on understanding digital data 
communications and their role in business organizations. The course explores key 
issues, general categories of principles, including basic concepts and terminology, 
various design approaches and applications in business. 



Graduate Curricula 381 



577 Special Topics in Information Technology Management 3 credits 

This course is an examination of selected topics relevant to the development of 
knowledge and skills in information technology management. Possible topics include 
electronic commerce, software engineering, decision support and expert systems, office 
automation, and other leading-edge technologies. 

585 Special Topics in Administration 3 credits 
Examination of selected topics relevant to the development of skills in administration. 
Possible topics include governmental relations strategies, time management, program 
assessment and evaluation. 

586 Strategic Planning and Management of Change 3 credits 

This course is an introduction to the strategic planning process and its application in 
managing organizational change. Techniques and skills involved in designing and 
implementing planned change to improve organizational adaptiveness and effectiveness 
in the changing political, economic, social, and technological environments. 

587 MIS Policy and Management of Technology 3 credits 
Based on the premise that the effective management of information systems requires 
some level of understanding of the underlying technologies, the course emphasizes 
managerial issues in information systems as opposed to concentrating on technical 
areas. The course considers enterprise architecture as its relates to the providing 
organizational information systems. 

590 Seminar 3 credits 

This is an advanced seminar offered to small groups of graduate students who wish to 
explore in greater depth a sub-specialty in administration that may include human 
resource issues and/or general management issues. 

595 Professional Contribution 3 credits 
This course includes the design and implementation of a special project or study relevant 
to the expressed needs of an organization or agency. 

Prerequisite: Academic advisor approval 

596 Administrative Practicum 3 credits 

This is an educationally-directed experience in an approved organizational setting. 
Application for the practicum must be made with the student's academic advisor. 

599 Independent Study Variable credits 

This class allows students to investigate a topic of interest with the guidance of a mentor 
approved by the university. Topics must be approved in advanced. 



382 Graduate Curricula 



Physical Therapy 

College of Health Sciences 
Degree MS, Physical Therapy 
Department Chair Susan P. Barker, PhD 

Faculty 

Susan P. Barker, Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Pennsylvania; MS Temple 
University; PhD Drexel University 

Richard Haydt, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy, BS Wilkes College; MSPT Beaver 
College; DPT University of St. Augustine 

Diane E. Madras, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BA University of Missouri-Columbia; 
MS Columbia University; PhD Louisiana State University 

Kelley A. Moran, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Delaware; MS Arcadia 
University; DPT Temple University 

Michael Moran, Professor of Physical Therapy, BS State University of New York at Stony Brook; 
MS University of Scranton; ScD Nova University 

Maureen Pascal, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS University of Pennsylvania; MS 
Boston University; DPT Temple University 

Steven Pheasant, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BA Wittenberg University; MS Arcadia 
University; PhD University of Toledo 

Amy Tremback-Ball, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy, BS, MS College Misericordia; 
PhD Marywood University 

Physical Therapy Major ( 

Students are no longer being accepted into the pre-professional phase of the Master of 
Science in Physical Therapy (MSPT) program. Transfer applications will be accepted into the 
professional phase of the program for fall 2009. The professional phase of the program is 
three years in duration. Students admitted as undergraduate transfers who successfully 
complete all major and university requirements will be awarded a bachelor of science degree 
in health science in addition to an MSPT degree. Students admitted with a baccalaureate 
degree will be awarded an MSPT degree upon successful completion of the professional 
program. 

The physical therapy program at Misericordia University received full accreditation status in 
2001 . Graduates of the program are eligible for licensure as physical therapists in the 
individual United States and territories. For additional information, contact the Commission on 
Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education at 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria VA 
22314-3245; (703) 706-3245; accreditation@apta.org. 

Mission 

It is the mission of the physical therapy education program to provide professional physical 
therapy education opportunities to the citizens of northeastern Pennsylvania and the 
surrounding regions of New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Pennsylvania and to help meet 
the physical therapy health care needs of these areas. 

The physical therapy program is committed to providing an education program that produces 
competent physical therapy practitioners who are critical thinkers and educated consumers of 
research. This program will prepare graduates for productive careers in physical therapy and 
as advocates for and participants in life long learning. 

As an entry-level professional post-baccalaureate program, the physical therapy curriculum 
reflects a commitment to the complementary relationship between liberal arts and professional 
studies which enables graduates to adapt to and deal with constantly evolving societal and 
professional needs. 



Graduate Curricula 383 



The physical therapy program's commitment to providing affordable, quality physical therapy 
education expresses the founding Sisters' values and attitudes of justice, mercy, and service. 

Philosophy 

The MSPT physical therapy education program is based on the belief that graduates of entry- 
level physical therapy programs should possess the clinical decision making and problem 
solving skills which enable them to function as peer colleagues in the contemporary health 
care system. Physical therapists need to be sensitive to the needs of a culturally diverse 
society as evidenced by their interactions with clients, families, health care colleagues, and 
the community in which they practice. 

An educational program for physical therapists should reflect the concepts of androgogy (adult 
education), including problem solving, critical thinking, analysis, integration of theory and 
practice, clinical decision making, mentoring, and self-directed learning. 

Physical therapists should have the ability to articulate and exchange knowledge and to seek 
additional knowledge and skills; and they should have the ability and desire to remain open to 
input from and collaboration with other health care professionals. They should value 
collaboration and communication in a spirit of mutual collegiality among health care providers 
and view these as essential to meeting the health care needs of society. 

A physical therapy professional education program not only prepares physical therapy 
generalists but also provides graduates with the tools that enable them to develop specialty 
expertise through the application of critical thinking and problem solving skills and a holistic 
approach to health care. 

The academic and clinical faculty and the academic and clinical education environments must 
reflect and foster professional values and behaviors. The academic and clinical faculty and 
curriculum components must be inextricably linked for the provision of professional education 
programs preparing competent health care practitioners. 

A diverse faculty whose members have responsibilities and activities consistent with their 
areas of teaching and scholarly expertise strengthens and enhances a professional education 
program. 

Goals 

The goals of the MSPT physical therapy education program are to prepare graduates who: 

1 . Are physical therapist generalists capable of contemporary, competent, legal, and 
ethical practice. 

2. Value the relevance of critical inquiry in the validation and advancement of the art and 
science of physical therapy. 

3. Appreciate the roles and responsibilities of physical therapists as professionally 
autonomous practitioners within the health care system. 

4. Accept the responsibility for education of self, the community, clients, and colleagues 
in the health care system. 

5. Value and foster communication and interaction with colleagues for the benefit of 
optimal service to clients. 

6. Respect and respond to contemporary bio-psycho-social diversity in interactions with 
clients, families, colleagues, and the community. 



384 Graduate Curricula 



Transfer into the Physical Therapy Program 

Applications will be accepted only for transfer admission into the professional program that 
begins in the fall semester of 2009. Admission to the physical therapy major is not guaranteed, 
and is on a space available basis. The deadline for submitting an application for transfers 
admissions is February 1 , 2009. Contact the admissions office for further information. All 
prerequisite coursework must be completed prior to beginning the professional program. 

Internal Transfer 

Students who currently attend Misericordia University and who wish to transfer into the 
physical therapy professional program will be evaluated by the physical therapy admissions 
committee, along with external transfer applicants. Admission to the physical therapy major is 
not guaranteed, and is on a space-available basis. The deadline for submitting an application 
for transfer admission is February 1, 2009. 

The criteria for admission into the professional MSPT program (fall semester, 2009) are: 

1 . Completion of at least 70 credits with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5, with at least a 
"B" average in prerequisite science courses highly desirable. 

2. Minimum combined SAT score of 1050 for critical reading and math (or the equivalent 
ACT score), with minimum SAT scores of 500 in the critical reading and math sections. 
If SAT scores are older than five years, GRE or Miller's Analogy Test scores are 
required. 

3. Completion of required prerequisite courses or their equivalents with a minimum grade 
of "C": 

CHM 104 General Chemistry ^ 4 credits 

CHM 105 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits 

BIO 211/212 Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8 credits 

PHY 107/108 Introductory Physics I & II 6 credits 

or 

PHY 1 17 & 1 18 Physics Introduction I & II 8 credits 

PSY123 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits 

SOC 101 Comparative Sociology (3 credits 

4. Completion of a minimum of 39 core curriculum credits. 

5. Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented 
paid or volunteer experience of 50 or more hours in at least two different facilities 
or a minimum of one year's full-time professional experience within the health care 
system. 

External Transfer 

Students who do not currently attend Misericordia University but who have completed college- 
level work may be evaluated for admission into the physical therapy program. 

Applicants Without Baccalaureate Degree 

Transfer applicants who do not have a baccalaureate degree may be admitted into the 
professional physical therapy program (fall semester, junior year) if they meet the criteria listed 
above for internal transfer candidates. Students who do not have an earned baccalaureate 
degree must complete all university requirements for a baccalaureate degree. 



Graduate Curricula 385 



Applicants with PTA Associate Degree 

Transfer students with a physical therapist assistant associate degree will fall under the 
following requirements with regard to core curriculum requirements: 

1 . Student must have at least one course on his/her transcript in each area of 
Misericordia University 's Core Curriculum. 

2. Courses transferred from another institution may represent the area of the core that 
the course satisfies. The appropriateness of the representational core substitute will be 
determined by the director of the program in which the core course resides. Courses 
taken at Misericordia University must satisfy the specific course requirement in the 
core area. 

3. From the date of enrollment only two additional courses may be taken off campus and 
these must be taken at a four-year institution. One of these may be in a core course. 

Applicants with Baccalaureate Degree 

Transfer applicants who have a baccalaureate degree may be admitted directly into the 
professional physical therapy program (junior year) if they meet the following criteria: 

1 . Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in college/university work completed. 

Successful completion of the following prerequisite university courses or their 
equivalent with a grade of at least "C" in each course: 

Chemistry with lab 2 semesters (must include organic chemistry) 

Physics with lab 2 semesters 

Human Anatomy with lab 1 semester 

Human Physiology with lab 1 semester 

Introduction to Psychology 1 semester 

2. Minimum total SAT score of 1 ,050 for critical reading and math (or the equivalent 
ACT score), with minimum SAT scores of 500 in the critical reading and math 
sections. If SAT scores are older than five years, GRE or Miller's Analogy Test 
scores are required. 

3. Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented 
paid or volunteer experience of 50 or more hours in at least two different facilities 
or a minimum of one year's full-time professional experience within the health care 
system. 

4. The following courses are not prerequisites; however, they must be completed by 
the spring semester of the first year of professional study. Transfer applicants are 
encouraged to complete them before entering the program: 

Statistics 1 semester 

Developmental Psychology 1 semester 

Advancement to the Professional Physical Therapy Program 

Advancement to the professional program (junior year) is based on the following criteria: 

1 . Completion of at least 70 credits with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 

2. Completion of required prerequisite courses or their equivalents with a minimum grade 
of"C":CHM 104/105, PHY 117/118, BIO 211/212, PSY 123, SOC 101, PT 304 

3. Completion of a minimum of 39 core curriculum credits 

4. Exposure to and exploration of physical therapy as demonstrated by documented paid 
or volunteer experience of 50 or more hours in at least two different facilities or a 
minimum of one year's full-time professional experience within the health care system. 



386 Graduate Curricula 



Advancement within the Professional Master of Science in Physical Therapy 
Program 

To advance within the professional program, students must: 

1 . Earn no grade below "B" in required professional level courses. 

2. Achieve at least a minimum level of competence (MLC) of 80 percent in all required 
professional level courses, and at least "C" in MTH 115 and PSY 275. 

3. Satisfy all university undergraduate and graduate requirements. 

Policies and procedures related to academic standards for the physical therapy program are 
included in the physical therapy student handbook supplied to all enrolled physical therapy 
students. 

Undergraduate Pre-professional Curriculum for MSPT Majors 

Sequence of required courses and suggested sequence of core courses: 
First Year 

First Semester Total Credits 16 Second Semester Total Credits 16 

CHM104 General Chemistry 4 CHM 105 Introduction to Organic 4 



Core or Elective 



12 



Chemistry 
Core or Elective 



12 



Summer 



Sophomore Year 



Total Credits 3 



Core or Elective 



First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 211 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 
PHY 117 Physics Introduction I 4 

Core or Elective 9 



Second Semester Total Credits 1 7 

BIO 212 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

PHY 118 Physics Introduction II 4 

PT 304 Health Wellness & HP 3 

Core or Elective 6 



Summer 



Core or Elective 
Core or Elective 



Total Credits 3 
3 
3 



Required core curriculum for PT majors: 

CPSSS Core 
Natural Science Core 
Mathematics Core 

Additional required courses: 
PSY 275§ 
PHY 117/118 



PSY 123, SOC 101 
CHM 104-105 
MTH 115 Statistics* 

BIO 211/212 
PT304 



Behavioral Science, Social Science, Education, Business or Language electives (6 credits) 

* Must be completed no later than Spring Semester of Junior year. 

§ Must be completed before the beginning of Fall Semester of Senior year. 



Graduate Curricula 387 



Master of Science in Physical Therapy Program 
Physical Therapy Professional Curriculum, MSPT Students 

Sequence of courses with suggested sequence of core and elective courses: 



First Professional Year (Junior) 

First Semester Total Credits 18 

PT 301 Gross Anatomy 5 

PT 405 Analysis of Human 4 

Movement 

PT 407 Applied Physiology 4 

PT409 PT Clinical Skills 2 

Core or Elective 3 



Second Semester Total Credits 16 

PT 302 Applied Neuroscience 4 

PT402 Clinical Science I 6 

PT 410 Integrated Clinical Arts I 3 

Core or Elective 3 



Summer Total Credits 6 

PT515 Research Methods 3 

Core or Elective 3 



Second Professional Year (Senior) 

First Semester Total Credits 1 7 

PT 503 Clinical Science II 4 



PT505 


Clinical Science III 


4 


PT511 


Integrated Clinical Arts II 


4 


PT590 


Research Seminar 


2 




Core or Elective 


3 



Second Semester Total Credits 14 

PT 518 Clinical Education I 6 3 

weeks 
PT 506 Clinical Science IV 10 

weeks 
PT 512 Integrated Clinical Arts III 



10 weeks 
PT 507 Clinical Science V 



Third Professional Year (Graduate) 



First Semester Total Credits 12 


Second Semester Total Credits 1 3 


PT619 


Clinical Education II 10 


6 


PT614 


Integrated Clinical Arts IV 3 




weeks 




PT690 


Critical Inquiry 2 


PT621 


Clinical Education III 10 


6 


PT616 


Clinical Decision Making 2 




weeks 




PT612 


Special Topic 3 
Core or Elective 3 



Physical Therapy Course Descriptions (PT) 

301 Gross Anatomy 5 credits 

The study of human anatomy, emphasizing structure and function in relationship to 
human movement. This is a regional gross anatomy course that incorporates inter- 
relationships among musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and 
visceral structure and function. Laboratory sessions will include cadaver dissection and 
will be strongly integrated with PT 405 Analysis of Human Movement and PT 407 
Applied Physiology. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 4 hours.) 

Prerequisites: BIO 211/212 Co-requisites: PT 405, PT 407, PT 409. Fall 



388 Graduate Curricula 






302 Applied Neuroscience 4 credits 

The study of the nervous system with an emphasis on sensorimotor structure and 
function, and common clinical pathology. Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and 
neuropathology are examined in the context of clinical examination. (Lecture: 3 hours, 
Lab: 2 hours.) 

Prerequisites: BIO 211/212, PT 301, PT 405, PT 407, PT 409, or permission of 
instructor. Fall 

304 Concepts of Health, Wellness and Health Professions 3 credits 

Exploration of the contemporary concepts of health and wellness as they relate to health 
promotion and maintenance, disease prevention and health care; the role of physical 
therapy as a health profession within a holistic health care model; the importance of 
professional behavior, critical inquiry, communication, interaction, cultural diversity, and 
collaboration in professional physical therapy practice. (Lecture: 2 hours/discussion and 
independent study.) 

Prerequisites: Required for sophomore PT majors as pre-professional prerequisite 
course or permission of program. Spring only 

402 Clinical Science I 6 credits 

This course will introduce the student to the skills necessary for physical therapy 
examination of and intervention for problems with the musculoskeletal system, primarily 
involving the upper and lower extremities. A number of examination and intervention 
principles utilized throughout the musculoskeletal system will be examined, as well as 
joint-specific principles. These principles will then be applied to the anatomy and 
biomechanics of the specific regions of the upper and lower extremities. Pathologies will 
be explored in light of their regional effects on anatomy and mechanics, as well as the 
effect of these changes in mechanics on the function of the body as a whole. Material 
from PT 301 Gross Anatomy, PT 405 Analysis of Human Movement, PT 407 Applied 
Physiology, and PT 409 PT Clinical Skills will be utilized to facilitate integration of these 
skills into total patient care. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 6 hours.) 

Prerequisites: PT 301, PT 405, 407, PT 409; Co-requisites: PT 302, PT 410. Spring 
only 

405 Analysis of Human Movement 4 credits 

The analysis of human movement from the developmental, kinesiological, and 
biomechanical perspectives. Functional anatomy, kinesiology and pathokinesiology of 
the joints, posture, functional movement patterns of the neck, trunk and limbs and gait as 
a basis for evaluation and intervention strategies in the presence of movement 
dysfunction associated with musculoskeletal problems. (Lecture: 3 hours, Lab: 2 hours.) 

Prerequisites: BIO 211-212; PHY 107-108 ; Co-requisites: PT301, PT 407, PT 409. 
Fall only 

407 Applied Physiology 4 credits 

Includes the physiological mechanisms affecting physical therapy evaluation and 
intervention strategies including physical agents, exercise, and modifying variables as 
related to maintaining and restoring homeostasis. Applied cardiovascular and respiratory 
physiology and exercise physiology including muscle physiology and energy production. 
(Lecture: 3 hours. Lab: 2 hours.) 

Prerequisites: BIO 211/212; CHM 104/105; Corequisites: PT 405, PT 409; PT 301. 
Fall only 



Graduate Curricula 389 



409 PT Clinical Skills 2 credits 

Introduction to patient handling, tests and measurements, and intervention strategies. 
Includes monitoring of vital signs, goniometry, manual muscle testing, posture and gait 
analysis; massage; modalities of heat, cold, light and water; therapeutic exercise; and 
gait training. Introduces problem solving, communication, documentation, and patient 
management. (Lab: 4 hours) 

Prerequisites: BIO 21 1/212; PHY 107/108 or PHY 117 & PHY 118; Corequisites: PT 
405, PT 407, PT301. Fall only 



410 Integrated Clinical Arts Seminar I 3 credits 

This is the first in a series of interactive lectures and seminars designed to integrate 
physical therapy clinical arts into clinical and foundation sciences from a bio-psycho- 
social perspective. Content for discussion includes the following: analysis of the impact 
of moderating variables such as age, gender, cultural diversity, environment and 
lifestyles across the lifespan; interpersonal and communications skills; professional 
roles, behaviors, values, and responsibilities; and appropriate utilization and application 
of medical imaging and pharmacology. Application and integration are geared 
particularly